Tag Archives: tess fowler

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

IDW Announces Dungeons & Dragons: A Darkened Wish Comic Series

The Forgotten Realms, the fantasy setting beloved by Dungeons & Dragons fans the world over, is the centerpiece for IDW Publishing’s all-new comic book miniseries, subtitled A Darkened Wish. Debuting in February 2019, the five-issue series will be written by B. Dave Walters with art by Tess Fowler.

In A Darkened Wish, years of hard-fought peace in the Sea of Swords are rent asunder, and legendary heroes must return to the region to defeat an unconceivable foe! Join Helene, a young wizard from the streets of Mintarn, and her friends as they grow from raw recruits to battle-honed warriors.

Preview: Plastic Man #5 (of 6)

Plastic Man #5 (of 6)

(W) Gail Simone (A) Adriana Melo (CA) Tess Fowler
In Shops: Oct 10, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Eel O’Brian takes a flexible view of morality: you walk on your side of the line, he’ll keep his feet on his (no promises about his hands, eyes, ears or midsection). That all stopped when his alter ego Plastic Man got suckered into the high-stakes world of super-heroic traitors and super-villainous cabals. Now he’s gonna stiffen his spine, screw up his courage and take the law into his own hands. Or he’s going to swat Queen Bee into next Tuesday with his fly-swatter hand. One or the other.

Preview: Kid Lobotomy, Vol. 1

Kid Lobotomy, Vol. 1

Peter Milligan (w) • Tess Fowler (a & c)

Meet Kid, the youngest descendant of a rich, demented hotelier named Big Daddy. Kid is the newly appointed manager of “The Suites,” but his good looks and swagger can’t hide a rough childhood of strange therapies and brain operations that have awakened inner demons and psychodramas.  This of course makes him eminently qualified to perform lobotomies.  A failed rockstar/successful madman gets one last chance to prove his worth—and regain his sanity—by turning the hotel that was once his childhood sanctuary into a lucrative business despite a host of obstacles including seductive shapeshifters, dead literary heroes and Kid’s own sister, who would love nothing more than to see him fail miserably.
Collects issues #1-6 of the ongoing series.

FC • 152 pages • $19.99 • ISBN: 978-1-68405-244-8

Preview: Black Crown Quarterly #3: Spring 2018

Black Crown Quarterly #3: Spring 2018

Peter Milligan, Rob Davis, David Barnett, Tini Howard, Jamie Coe & Various (w) • Tess Fowler, Rob Davis, Martin Simmonds, Philip Bond, Jaime Coe & Various (a) • Philip Bond (c)

PERFORMANCE! ART! This sumptuous spring selection of regular shorts, new works, and sublime interviews includes “Tales From the Black Crown Pub” by Rob Davis; “Cud: Rich & Strange” by Potter, Puttnam, and Bond (which follows the rise and fall and rise of the greatest British band you’ve never heard of but can’t live without); “Swell Maps,” “Canonball Comics,” and “Beat Surrender.” Plus, more “House Amok” by Christopher Sebela and Shawn McManus; and “Hey, Amateur!—How to Spot a Galaxy” by Emmeline Pidgen. Find out where the bodies are buried beneath the cross street of Canon and Great Yarn a la “The Great Ghost Walking Tour” by Tini Howard and Philip Bond. And finally: a new feature involving a raygun, a live mic, and pure pandemonium (a la Rashomon) begins!

FC • 48 pages • $7.99

Preview: Penny Dreadful #9

Penny Dreadful #9

Writer Chris King
Artist Jesús Hervás
CVR A Tess Fowler
CVR B Photo by Dan Bura
CVR C Claudia Ianniciello
32pp, $3.99, On sale Date: April 11, 2018

Vanessa Ives’ body has been inhabited by the ultimate evil, Satan, as the hordes of hell rampage through the streets of London. Ethan, still grieving for the love of his life, has committed an act that will surely lead to the ultimate destruction of mankind… unless they can find the eternal flame, the only thing that can put an end to the horror that has befallen humanity.

With so much at stake, and time of the essence, Catriona Hardtegan and Victor Frankenstein are charged with gathering their scattered troops, all the while battling demons and the Nephilim, in a desperate attempt to put on a show of force when they hunt down the immortal scourge of souls, and their last hope for redemption…the elusive Dracula.

Preview: Kid Lobotomy #6

Kid Lobotomy #6

Peter Milligan (w) • Tess Fowler (a) • Nick Robles  (c) • Lee Loughridge (colorist)

“A Lad Insane,” Part 6 of 6. Why is Kid insane? How come he’s having an affair with Kafka’s favorite sister? And just what did our failed rock god’s 12-year-old self see in the lower depths of the haunted hotel from hell? Our hero finally gets some answers. But will they drive him crazier than King Lear?

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Preview: Kid Lobotomy #5

Kid Lobotomy #5

Peter Milligan (w) • Tess Fowler (a & c) • Lee Loughridge (colorist)

Kafka-obsessed young hotel manager Kid Lobotomy is about to have his brain tweaked by Big Daddy and renegade neurologist Doc Cyclops. Meanwhile, Kid’s complex sister Rosebud finally has control of the Suites. Could a cockroach be Kid’s salvation? Can dead uncle Gloucester show him the way to the truth? Can Adam Mee finally write his second novel? And can Ottla and Gervais elbow their way into a busy plot? Weird medicine, a symbolist classic, and a girl on a horse. All this and more surprises in “A Lad Insane,” Part Five.

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Femme Magnifique Gets a New Print Through IDW’s Black Crown

Femme Magnifique, the wildly successful Kickstarter comic book anthology, is headed back to print for a beautiful softcover edition this September. It is a celebration of 50 iconic women who shattered glass ceilings and changed the course of history in the process.

Told by over 100 of the most talented creators in comics from around the world, Femme Magnifique features 3-page short stories about women from the world of music, art, politics, and science. Explored from a personal angle, the subjects of these mini-biopics include Kate BushOctavia ButlerRumiko TakahashiAda LovelaceMisty CopelandMargaret SangerMichelle ObamaUrsula K. Le GuinSally RideHarriet Tubman and more!

Femme Magnifique was conceived and co-curated by Shelly Bond and Kristy Miller & Brian Miller of Hi-Fi Colour Design. It features contributions from such comic book luminaries as Cecil Castellucci, Marguerite BennettBill SienkiewiczJen BartelMike CareyKelly Sue DeConnickTini HowardElsa CharretierTess FowlerRafael AlbuquerqueTee FranklinGilbert HernandezMing DoyleMatt WagnerJim RuggGail SimoneMags VisaggioMarguerite SauvageGerard WayPhilip BondHope NicholsonSanford GreeneSonny LiewJen HickmanMark BuckinghamPeter GrossTyler CrookDan Parent, and Kieron Gillen, among many others.

Maxing out at nearly $100,000 raised for the Kickstarter edition, earning over 240% of its initial goal, Femme Magnifique found its audience swiftly. Now, those who missed out on the first go-round can add this collection to their library packed with new bonus material including a foreword, behind-the-scenes process pages, and more.

The new paperback edition of Femme Magnifique will become available on September 4, 2018 and can now be pre-ordered using ISBN: 978-1684053209

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