Tag Archives: terry dodson

Adventureman #1 Gets a Second Printing

The highly anticipated new series launch from Matt Fraction, Terry and Rachel DodsonAdventureman—is being rushed back to print from Image Comics in order to keep up with growing reader and retailer demand. The new adventure series stole readers’ hearts with out-of-this-world fantasy escapism, low flying steampunk dirigibles, and a pulse-pounding premise perfect for any age. 

Adventureman #1 begins when a mysterious customer enters Claire’s bookstore and leaves behind a mint condition Adventureman edition in a hurry, strange things begin happening. Did Adventureman’s story truly end eighty years ago? Or is there more to the pulp superhero’s tale yet to be unveiled?

Adventureman #1, second printing (Diamond Code APR208592) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, July 22. Adventureman #2 (Diamond Code MAR200214) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, July 8. 

Adventureman #1, second printing

Review: Adventureman #1

Adventureman #1

I definitely understand where the all-star creative team Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson are coming from in their new series Adventureman #1. The series chronicles the exploits of Claire Connell. She’s a single mom/used bookstore owner, who is tasked to complete the cliffhanger of an old pulp novel called Adventureman. It’s an homage to old World War II pulp-era stories as evidenced by the art from the Dodsons. That swings from old school pinups to two-fisted action with a very 21st century metafictional twist.

But it’s not all retro with a lot of the story having a domestic, realist feel in Claire’s interactions with her Adventureman-obsessed son, Tommy, to her boisterous family at Shabbat dinner. The collision of these worlds is the true hook for Adventureman. The first issue has a few stumbles to go with Fraction’s clever writing and the Dodsons’ beautiful visuals.

I like Claire Connell as a character. However, Adventureman #1 is overstuffed and overwhelming as a narrative. It’s packed with constant character introductions, extraneous caption boxes, all to tell an origin story beat. Fraction and the Dodsons introduce dozens of characters even though two, maybe three matter at this point in the story. Luckily, the characters (Especially the baddies) in the “Adventureman” portion of the story have fun, atompunk character designs from the Dodsons whereas Claire’s family get melodramatic captions and a unifying trait of loudness. This tone is matched by Fraction’s writing, which is pure bombast in both parts of Adventureman #1 and also by a flurry of double page spreads and moving parts from Terry Dodson and an explosive color palette from Rachel Dodson.

But what Adventureman #1 really has going for it, and why I will continue to follow this comic is the development of its protagonist, Claire. First off, it’s super cool to have a single mom take the lead in a heroic adventure that is rooted in both the real world as well as pulp fiction. The page turn reveal from a hero falling to a mom reading is pure joy, and Claire’s love of books and stories are evident in her interactions with Tommy and approach to the work day at her used bookstore that specializes in stories like Adventureman.

However, she is content to interact with these stories from an arm’s length as a reader and as she shares them with her son and the occasional customer. Instead of leaping into action, Claire removes her hearing aids to escape New York (or her family’s noise) and relax for a bit. Fraction and the Dodsons connect this very specific behavior, which demonstrates her introversion and love for escapism, to the comic’s big turning point.

As I have hinted at earlier, Adventureman #1’s other big selling point other than its relatable, likable main character is the Dodsons’ art and colors. Their visuals are much more refined and fluid than their recent work on the X-Men/Fantastic Four miniseries showcasing an advantage of creator-owned comics over corporate, monthly deadline ones. Fraction’s script creates wonderful spaces for storytelling like expressionist cityscapes where Adventureman and his friends battle Baroness Bizarre and her goons or the sanctuary of fandom, story, and later adventure that is Claire and Tommy’s loft apartment. A sense of drama drives everything whether it is over-the-top conversations at the dinner table or punching, kicking, and airships, and the Dodsons do a good job of illustrating both types.

Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson definitely take an everything but the kitchen sink approach to the form and content of Adventureman #1. It’s a fully realized pulp story and family comic held together by metafictional strings. Yes, Grant Morrison fans, there’s a sigil. Plus, there’s a never-ending flurry of widescreen pages with detailed art. A fan of a type of story finding herself in the middle of one is just good old fashioned comfort food for dark times.

Story: Matt Fraction Pencils: Terry Dodson
Inks/Colors: Rachel Dodson Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 6.2 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.6 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleTFAW

Early Review: Adventureman #1

Adventureman #1

I definitely understand where the all-star creative team Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson are coming from in their new series Adventureman #1. The series chronicles the exploits of Claire Connell. She’s a single mom/used bookstore owner, who is tasked to complete the cliffhanger of an old pulp novel called Adventureman. It’s an homage to old World War II pulp-era stories as evidenced by the art from the Dodsons. That swings from old school pinups to two-fisted action with a very 21st century metafictional twist.

But it’s not all retro with a lot of the story having a domestic, realist feel in Claire’s interactions with her Adventureman-obsessed son, Tommy, to her boisterous family at Shabbat dinner. The collision of these worlds is the true hook for Adventureman. The first issue has a few stumbles to go with Fraction’s clever writing and the Dodsons’ beautiful visuals.

I like Claire Connell as a character. However, Adventureman #1 is overstuffed and overwhelming as a narrative. It’s packed with constant character introductions, extraneous caption boxes, all to tell an origin story beat. Fraction and the Dodsons introduce dozens of characters even though two, maybe three matter at this point in the story. Luckily, the characters (Especially the baddies) in the “Adventureman” portion of the story have fun, atompunk character designs from the Dodsons whereas Claire’s family get melodramatic captions and a unifying trait of loudness. This tone is matched by Fraction’s writing, which is pure bombast in both parts of Adventureman #1 and also by a flurry of double page spreads and moving parts from Terry Dodson and an explosive color palette from Rachel Dodson.

But what Adventureman #1 really has going for it, and why I will continue to follow this comic is the development of its protagonist, Claire. First off, it’s super cool to have a single mom take the lead in a heroic adventure that is rooted in both the real world as well as pulp fiction. The page turn reveal from a hero falling to a mom reading is pure joy, and Claire’s love of books and stories are evident in her interactions with Tommy and approach to the work day at her used bookstore that specializes in stories like Adventureman.

However, she is content to interact with these stories from an arm’s length as a reader and as she shares them with her son and the occasional customer. Instead of leaping into action, Claire removes her hearing aids to escape New York (or her family’s noise) and relax for a bit. Fraction and the Dodsons connect this very specific behavior, which demonstrates her introversion and love for escapism, to the comic’s big turning point.

As I have hinted at earlier, Adventureman #1’s other big selling point other than its relatable, likable main character is the Dodsons’ art and colors. Their visuals are much more refined and fluid than their recent work on the X-Men/Fantastic Four miniseries showcasing an advantage of creator-owned comics over corporate, monthly deadline ones. Fraction’s script creates wonderful spaces for storytelling like expressionist cityscapes where Adventureman and his friends battle Baroness Bizarre and her goons or the sanctuary of fandom, story, and later adventure that is Claire and Tommy’s loft apartment. A sense of drama drives everything whether it is over-the-top conversations at the dinner table or punching, kicking, and airships, and the Dodsons do a good job of illustrating both types.

Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson definitely take an everything but the kitchen sink approach to the form and content of Adventureman #1. It’s a fully realized pulp story and family comic held together by metafictional strings. Yes, Grant Morrison fans, there’s a sigil. Plus, there’s a never-ending flurry of widescreen pages with detailed art. A fan of a type of story finding herself in the middle of one is just good old fashioned comfort food for dark times.

Story: Matt Fraction Pencils: Terry Dodson
Inks/Colors: Rachel Dodson Letters: Clayton Cowles
Story: 6.2 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.6 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleTFAW

Matt Fraction, Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson Take You on Adventure with Adventureman in April

New York Times bestselling, Eisner Award winning writer Matt Fraction, artist Terry Dodson, and Rachel Dodson team up for an all-new, ongoing adventure series—Adventureman—from Image Comics this April beginning with a massively extra length and wildly affordable first issue.

The story of beloved pulp hero “Adventureman” ended with a never-resolved cliff-hanger for his legion of fans as their hero faced execution at the vile hand of his ultra-nemesis “Baron Bizarre.” And now, eighty years later, single mother Claire and her Adventurefan son Tommy seem to be the only two people alive that remember the thrilling Adventureman sagas… but from that memory burns the spark of… resurrection. What if it was all true? What if it all really happened? And what if it was happening again? Where his story ended… her story begins!  

Blending high-octane pulp action, low-flying dirigibles and more art-deco rayguns than you could shake a walking stick at, Adventureman kicks off with a 64 page issue filled to the brim with action and intrigue for the introductory cover price of $3.99.

Adventureman #1 (Diamond Code FEB200011) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, April 29.

Adventureman #1

Review: X-Men/Fantastic Four : 4X #1

It’s been foreshadowed for a while but the Fantastic Four and X-Men clash over the future of wellbeing of Franklin Richards.

Story: Chip Zdarsky
Art: Terry Dodson
Ink: Rachel Dodson, Dexter Vines, Karl Story
Color: Laura Martin
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW
Zeus Comics

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Vampirella’s 50th Anniversary Celebrated in Deluxe Art Book

Vampirella‘s anniversary celebration continues with a hotly anticipated deluxe art book honoring her recent history and portrayals. The Vampirella 50th Anniversary Artbook is out in February 2020.

This breathtaking tome reproduces countless already and soon-to-be classic portrayals of the Daughter of Drakulon on beautiful oversized pages. Picking up right where Art of Vampirella: The Dynamite Years left off, this brand-new hardcover volume features hundreds of covers, including well over 40 from 2019’s smash hit Vampirella #1. Plus covers from the critically acclaimed 2014 run by Nancy Collins, the Linsners’ masterpiece Roses for the Dead, and much more from the Vampi archives.

Superstar artists included within these pages include Artgerm, J. Scott Campbell, Lucio Parrillo, Alex Ross, Jenny Frison, Terry Dodson, Joe Jusko, and many, many more.

Vampirella 50th Anniversary Artbook

Preview: Vampirella (Vol.5) #5

Vampirella (Vol.5) #5

writer: Christopher Priest
artist: Ergün Gündüz
covers: Terry Dodson (A), Guillem March (B), Fay Dalton (C), Ergün Gündüz (D), Cosplay (E)
Artgerm Sneak Peek (RI), Fay Dalton (RI-B/W), Cosplay (RI-Virgin), Guillem March (RI-Virgin), Artgerm Sneak Peek (RI-Virgin)
FC | 32 pages | Horror | $3.99 | Teen+

Seduction of The Innocent continues

Following her mother, Lilith’s advice, Vampirella chooses to end her loneliness by engaging in community, connecting with friends, building a new career, and creating roots within her adopted world — which invites inevitable consequences as her enemies continue to gather for a mysterious purpose, and her mother receives a visit from a man from Vampirella’s past.

Vampirella (Vol.5) #5
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