Tag Archives: tana ford

Review: Livewire #12

Livewire #12

“Hero” reaches its thrilling endgame in Livewire #12!

With the whole country watching, Livewire is targeted by a trusted confidant, will she remain America’s Most Wanted?

The climactic final chapter building since Secret Weapons and through Harbinger Wars 2 is finally here!

With Livewire #12 Vita Ayala makes the bold decision to have the finale be a much more cerebral affair than your typical run of the mill finales. While there is tension within the comic, it’s not of the physical kind; instead, Ayala weaves a level of intensity through Livewire’s internal narration and the dialogue that borders on thriller level as the machinations of certain characters are teased.

Initially, the ending might seem somewhat underwhelming, and I understand that point of view, but I found it more interesting than reading about Livewire fighting her way through security defenses and the like. The wrapping up of the story in this way is immensely satisfying; there are very few loose ends left after twelve issues, and Livewire is positioned very well for the next person to take on the character.

Although Ayala has scripted an interesting and compelling tale about Livewire, there’s no denying that they were left with an… interesting place to begin after the events of Harbinger Wars II. While Livewire’s actions were extreme in that story, it’s refreshing that they weren’t just swept away as the world moved on (while there may be some who choose to ignore Harbinger Wars II, this series will at the very least serve as the epilogue).

I’ve enjoyed the political spin of this comic. When I say that, I’m not saying that no other comics are political, but rather that I enjoyed the way this comic treats politics, politicians and the process of an election. It’s probably not utterly accurate, but at least from my understanding, it’s pretty close (the huge caveat there is that I am an Englishman living in Canada, so I’m not all that familiar with the way senate elections actually work).

This series has served in many ways to recenter Amanda McKee and deal with how her actions have impacted the general public, as well as the psiot herself. With the political background of the final arc, Ayala’s taken an interesting path to Livewire’s redemption – and it’s well worth reading if you like a little bit of the political process with your comics.

Livewire #12 specifically, though, is a strong book. Both as the finale and as a standalone comic. Ayala comes out of this series on a high note, and I am sure that their star will continue to shine in comics.

Story: Vita Ayala Art: Tana Ford
Colorist: Kelly Fitzpatrick Letterer: Saida Temofonte
Story: 8.6 Art: 7.1 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Livewire #12

LIVEWIRE #12

Written by VITA AYALA
Art by TANA FORD, BRUNO OLIVIERA
Cover A by STACEY LEE
Cover B by HELEN CHEN
Cover C by KEVIN WADA
On sale NOVEMBER 6 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

“Hero” reaches its thrilling endgame!

With the whole country watching, Livewire is targeted by a trusted confidant, will she remain America’s Most Wanted?

The climactic final chapter building since Secret Weapons and through Harbinger Wars 2 is finally here!

LIVEWIRE #12

Review: Livewire #11

Livewire #11

Amanda McKee—aka “Livewire”—continues the fight to clear her name in Livewire #11.

Teamed up with politician John Wright, Amanda learns there’s more to superhero-ing than just punching bad guys.  When masked men hold a charity rally hostage, Livewire is ready to show the world she can be a hero in the spotlight!

With Vita Ayala placing Livewire in a situation that finds her caught in the middle of a political battle being used as a pawn in an election battle between an incumbent senator and his challenger, we’ve been treated to a unique and interesting story that has a focus away from what we’ve been used to seeing; Livewire’s reputation being repaired through political means.

It’s a fascinating concept, and I’ve really enjoyed how Ayala has allowed this to play out while giving us an at first subtle subplot to the arc, as well.

There’s a touch less subtly this issue as Livewire attends a charity ball/event/whatever-it-is, which (as you may have guessed from the above preview text) leads to her having a very quick and very real impact on the lives of the party goers. Whether this furthers the agenda of the politician looking to make a career based on taking a stand for psiots. That there’s an underlying motive goes without saying, and it’s how both plots weave in and out of focus as the story progresses that has struck me.

Yes, Livewire’s redemption is a secondary concern to the councilman, but that doesn’t mean he isn’t playing the game to the best of his ability (and we still don’t know what his end game is, I’m enjoying the tidbits we’re getting).

Tana Ford‘s art still isn’t my cup of tea, but I still think that I just need time to adjust to the thicker lines and a style that gives me a rough pop art feel. I can understand the appeal, but I’m not there yet (and I say yet, because I wasn’t fond of Raul Allen and Patricia Martin’s style until after I spent a good few issues absorbing it).

Livewire #11 is, on the whole, a really solid comic with an interesting angle on the way politicians and public figures manipulate the general public’s perception and thoughts.

Story: Vita Ayala Art: Tana Ford
Colorist: Kelly Fitzpatrick Letterer: Saida Temofonte
Story: 8.4 Art: 7.1 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Livewire #10

Livewire #10

Amanda McKee—a.k.a. technopath psiot “Livewire”—fights to clear her name in Livewire #10.

But when she teams up with a politician to repair her image and make herself a hero again…

…Will the public be able to forgive her?

Valiant‘s Livewire #10 is written by Vita Ayala and features Tana Ford‘s artistic talents, and Kelly Fitzpatrick‘s colors. It continues the campaign to change the psiot’s public image at the behest of a Senate hopeful and his campaign manager. Is everything really as straight forward as it seems? Or is there an ulterior motive for somebody to want to improve Livewire’s image?

Well, as with all things politics, I’m sure you can guess the answer. Ayala has created a story arc that has the potential to write a scathing commentary. It skewers the way we interact with media and how we’re manipulated by others into thinking a certain way. It’s got the potential to be a fantastic way to approach the subject through the eyes of a disgraced hero. That makes this a story that I’m really interested in, especially given the current climate.

Livewire’s reputation at this point is… well it isn’t exactly great. If you were to liken it to another comic universe, you’d be thinking Magneto at his absolute worst – she is responsible for the deaths of a lot of innocent people, after all. But did the results of her actions justify the reasons? Can she be redeemed? I don’t know, but I’m really enjoying Ayala’s exploration of what it means to be a hero to some and a villain to others. The writer’s willingness to embrace the moral ambiguity of the title character is really exciting, and is going to provide some brilliant social commentary.

Once again, despite the strength of the story, Ford’s art doesn’t do it for me. I’m not a huge fan of the thicker lines used in the comic; I’m aware it’s a stylistic preference, but the boldness of the lines takes away from energy in the story. Ford has a great sense of page construction and sequential story telling, balancing Ayala’s script pretty well.

I’m still in a strange place with the art and the writing; on one hand I want to like the art, but I’m not there yet (there are certainly positives to it, but Ford and Fitzpatrick don’t compliment each other as well as other pairings have in the series), and on the other I’m really intrigued by the story. Your mileage will obviously vary, but for my money (because I will also buy this book), this comic is still well worth buying.

Story: Vita Ayala Art: Tana Ford
Colorist: Kelly Fitzpatrick Letterer: Saida Temofonte
Story: 9.1 Art: 7.3 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Livewire #10

LIVEWIRE #10

Written by VITA AYALA
Art by TANA FORD
Colors by KELLY FITZPATRICK
Letters by SAIDA TEMOFONTE
Cover A by STACEY LEE
Cover B by KATIE COOK
Cover C by IRENE KOH
Pre-Order Edition by ELSA CHARRETIER
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 11th

Amanda McKee—a.k.a. technopath psiot “Livewire”—fights to clear her name.

But when she teams up with a politician to repair her image and make herself a hero again…

…Will the public be able to forgive her?

LIVEWIRE #10

Review: Livewire #9

Livewire #9

In Livewire #9, wanted fugitive Livewire has been on the run for months from the authorities for shutting down the country’s power in an effort to protect people gifted with powers.

Valiant‘s Livewire #9, written by Vita Ayala and featuring Tana Ford‘s artistic talents, and Kelly Fitzpatrick opens a new arc. It finds Livewire as the target of a campaign manager who wants to improve her image. It’s a story arc that has the potential to write a scathing commentary of the way we interact with media. Based on the first issue, Ayala seems more than ready to talk about that. That makes this a comic that I’m really interested in, especially given the current climate.

What’s interesting about a campaign manager looking to improve Livewire’s public perception is that we’re going to see how the media and the public will react to Livewire as the campaign manager manipulates the information available – and how it will be done.

We’ve seen what Livewire has done and why she’s viewed as a terrorist by the public. If you don’t know, she intentionally caused a nationwide blackout for several days as a reaction to the murders of young psiots. In so doing she caused the deaths of those who relied on the nations electrical grid. We’ve also become familiar with how Livewire feels about her actions.

Perhaps one of my favorite things about this series is how Vita Ayala has yet to explicitly cast Livewire as a hero in her own book, and that’s what makes the newest arc in the series so interesting; do you see the title character as a hero, a villain or something in between? Ayala is able to challenge our views on what makes a hero a hero without ever really coming out clearly on either side of things.

One thing is for certain, though; under Ayala’s deft hand Amanda McKee has become one of the most interesting characters in comics.

Unfortunately, despite a strong showing from Ayala, Ford seems a little inconsistent with the visuals in the comic. Art, obviously is very subjective. You might read this book and think it’s great. If you do, I’m pleased for you. But for me the comic felt like it lacked a certain polish in more places than not. One of the early scenes in the comic involves a fight. There’s three panels that don’t flow as well as they could have. A different choice in the choreography, a left hand instead of a right hand, would have made a world of difference. Unfortunately, this was early enough in the comic. That took me out just enough to pay attention to the art with a harsher critical eye.

My feelings on the art and the writing live in an odd dichotomy; I’m not a huge fan of one and love the other. This leaves me to think about the product as a whole, and overall it’s still a very strong one.

Livewire has been one of Valiant’s better series over the last few months. It’s one that has been gaining momentum in the quality department. So it can afford a stumble or two without and loss of faith from yours truly. Really, this stumble is entirely down to arguably the most subjective aspect of the comic. Ayala’s willingness to play with the superhero tropes whilst continuing to write a compelling story should not be missed.

Story: Vita Ayala Art: Tana Ford
Colorist: Kelly Fitzpatrick Letterer: Saida Temofonte
Story: 9.1 Art: 7.1 Overall: 8.6 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Livewire #9

LIVEWIRE #9 (New Arc!)

Written by VITA AYALA
Art by TANA FORD
Colors by KELLY FITZPATRICK
Letters by SAIDA TEMOFONTE
Cover A by STACEY LEE
Cover B by RAÚL ALLÉN
Cover C by KRIS ANKA
Pre-Order Edition by JEN BARTEL
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale AUGUST 21st

“Hero” begins here!

Wanted fugitive Livewire has been on the run for months from the authorities for shutting down the country’s power in an effort to protect people gifted with powers.

Will a shocking offer to go public pull Livewire into a political spotlight?

LIVEWIRE #9

Northwest Press announces Theater of Terror

Credit: Art by Phil Jimenez, color by William O. Tyler

Comics publisher Northwest Press, an LGBTQ comics publisher founded in 2010, today launched a crowdfunding campaign for its newest anthology, Theater of Terror: Revenge of the Queers.

Edited by Justin Hall and William O. Tyler, the project will be a full-color, 250-page book, and will feature work by 33 comics writers and artists. It also features cover art by comics superstar Phil Jimenez and features a connecting storyline featuring Peaches Christ, a real-life drag horror hostess.

In addition to Jimenez’ cover, the book has contributions from a lot of prominent comics creators, including Mariko TamakiSina GraceBrad RaderRachel PollackTana Ford, and Terry Blas.

The Kickstarter campaign to fund the production of the book launched on May 17th and runs until June 16. It offers rewards such as print and digital editions of the book, signed limited edition pinup prints, an all-over-printed t-shirt based on the endpapers designed by Michael Wertz, custom video messages from host Peaches Christ, and original art from contributors to the book.

Abbott, Black Panther, Monstress, On a Sunbeam, Paper Girls, and Saga Nominated for the 2019 Hugo Awards

Hugo Award

Today, the finalists for the 2019 Hugo Awards, Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book, and John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards were announced online today by Dublin 2019.

Below are the nominees for “Best Graphic Story” and you can get the full list of nominees here. Three Image Comics series were nominated while BOOM!, Marvel, and First Second all received one nomination.

Congrats to all those nominated!

  • Abbott, written by Saladin Ahmed, art by Sami Kivelä, colours by Jason Wordie, letters by Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)
  • Black Panther: Long Live the King, written by Nnedi Okorafor and Aaron Covington, art by André Lima Araújo, Mario Del Pennino and Tana Ford (Marvel)
  • Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image Comics)
  • On a Sunbeam, by Tillie Walden (First Second)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 4, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image Comics)
  • Saga, Volume 9, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Below are the finalists for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards for “Best Graphic Story.”

  • Buck Rogers: Martians Invade Jupiter, by Philip Nowlan and Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Flash Gordon: Fiery Desert of Mongo, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Garth, by Steve Dowling (Daily Mirror)
  • Plastic Man #1: The Game of Death, by Jack Cole (Vital Publications)
  • Le Secret de la Licorne [The Secret of the Unicorn], by Hergé (Le Soir)
  • Wonder Woman #5: Battle for Womanhood, written by William Moulton Marsden, art by Harry G. Peter (DC Comics)

Take a Trip to Laguardia with Nnedi Okorafor, Tana Ford, and Berger Books

From Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Award-winning author Nnedi Okorafor and critically acclaimed illustrator Tana Ford comes LaGuardia. This new four-issue miniseries is the latest addition to the second wave of titles in the Berger Books imprint at Dark Horse. LaGuardia reunites Nnedi Okorafor and Tana Ford, the powerhouse creative team behind Marvel’s Black Panther: Long Live the King #6.

Set in an alternative world where aliens have come to Earth and integrated with society, LaGuardia revolves around a pregnant Nigerian-American doctor, Future Nwafor Chukwuebuka who has just returned to NYC under mysterious conditions. After smuggling an illegal alien plant named “Letme Live” through LaGuardia International and Interstellar Airport’s customs and security, she arrives at her grandmother’s tenement, the New Hope Apartments in the South Bronx.

There, she and Letme become part of a growing population of mostly African and shape-shifting alien immigrants, battling against interrogation, discrimination and travel bans, as they try to make it in a new land. But, as the birth of her child nears, Future begins to change in more ways than one. What dark secret is she hiding?

The first issue of LaGuardia goes on sale October 31, 2018, and will soon be available for preorder at your local comic shop for $4.99.

« Older Entries