Tag Archives: shutter

100% of Image’s Pride Month Variant Cover Proceeds to Go to Human Rights Campaign

Image Comics has revealed the first six of eleven variants planned for June’s 25th-anniversary theme—“Pride Month.” The variants will serve to celebrate the LGBTQ community and the progress made by the Gay Liberation Movement in promoting inclusivity and support for all. 100% of the proceeds made from these June Pride variant covers will be donated to Human Rights Campaign.

Each month of Image’s 25th year will boast a theme for special anniversary variants.

Available in stores on Wednesday, June 7th (Final order cutoff deadline Monday, May 15th):

  • The Walking Dead #168 by Robert Kirkman & Charlie Adlard, cover art by Sina Grace, cover colors by Tamra Bonvillain (Diamond Code MAR178612)
  • The Divided States of Hysteria #1 by Howard Chaykin, cover by Chaykin (Diamond Code MAR178603)

Available in stores on Wednesday, June 14th (Final order cutoff deadline Monday, May 22nd):

  • Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1 by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro, cover by De Landro (Diamond Code MAR178611)
  • Rose #3 by Meredith Finch and Ig Guara, cover by Guara (Diamond Code MAR178609)

Available in stores on Wednesday, June 21st (Final order cutoff deadline Monday, May 29th):

  • Crosswind #1 by Gail Simone and Cat Staggs, cover by Staggs (Diamond Code MAR178608)
  • GRRL Scouts: Magic Socks #4 by Jim Mahfood, cover by Mahfood (Diamond Code MAR178610)
  • The Old Guard #5 by Greg Rucka and Leandro Fernandez, cover by Fernandez (Diamond Code MAR178604)

Available in stores on Wednesday, June 28th (Final order cutoff deadline Monday, June 5th):

  • Black Magick #6 by Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott, cover by Scott (Diamond Code MAR178605)
  • Deadly Class #29 by Rick Remender and Wes Craig, cover by Craig (Diamond Code MAR178607)
  • Shutter #29 by Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca, cover by del Duca (Diamond Code MAR178606)
  • Redneck #3 by Donny Cates and Lisandro Estherren, cover by Ed Luce (Diamond Code MAR178737)

Madison’s Favorite Comics of 2016

Last year I prioritized cutting back on cape books and diversifying the publishers and stories that I read. Though many of the comics I read weren’t published in 2016 (especially ones I read during Women’s History Month) I still found it hard to narrow down the list of ongoing series I particularly loved throughout the year.

Here are ten comics I couldn’t put down in 2016:

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10. Goldie Vance by Hope Larson and Brittney Williams

This is a series I would have loved as a child. Goldie is the perfect mix of Nancy Drew and Eloise (of Plaza fame). Goldie Vance is great for a younger audience but doesn’t shy away from emotionally complex stories. Goldie and her friends are well-rounded characters with a wide range of interests who readers–young and not-young alike–will be able to relate to.

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9. Elasticator by Alan C. Medina and Kevin Shah

Elasticator is the kind of smart, political superhero comic I wish was more prevalent. The writing is fresh and interesting and Shah’s art is lively and animated with great colors from Ross A. Campbell.

Snotgirl

8. Snotgirl by Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung

Lottie Person is just about as far away from Scott Pilgrim as you could get, though they do, at times, share a similar self-absorption. Snotgirl quickly became one of my favorite series of the year, because while not many people can say they’re successful fashion bloggers, they can likely relate to Lottie’s personal problems. Leslie Hung and Mickey Quinn provide gorgeous, vibrant visuals and the best wardrobe in comics, to boot.

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7. We(l)come Back by Christopher Sebela and Claire Roe

Reincarnation? Check. Assassins? Check. Shadowy organizations? Check. A+ fashion choices? Check. Reincarnated assassins in love running from other assassins who are trying to assassinate them? …Also check. What more can you want from a story?

shutter #18 featured

6. Shutter by Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca

Shutter is one of Image’s most underrated titles. The story follows Kate Kristopher, the daughter of legendary explorer Chris Kristopher, and her discovery of some little-known family history. The comic is consistently interesting not only because of its plot, but because del Duca and colorist Owen Gieni are constantly experimenting with narrative structure and using different techniques to influence how the story is read.

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5. Clean Room by Gail Simone and Jon Davis-Hunt

Clean Room is a creepy psychological horror comic about journalist Chloe Pierce’s investigation of self-help master Astrid Mueller, who Pierce suspects is more cult leader than anything else. Or is she? Mueller is a fascinating character, and the unknowable question of which side she’s actually on only adds to the story’s suspense.

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4. The Wicked + The Divine by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie

What if you could be a god, but you’d die within two years? Consistently equal parts entertaining and heartbreaking with consistently incredible art and color from Jamie McKelvie and Matt Wilson. You’ve probably heard of this one.

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3. Mockingbird by Chelsea Cain, Kate Niemczyk, Sean Parsons, and Ibrahim Moustafa

One of the few superhero comics I read this year, Mockingbird was one of my absolute favorites. Cain writes Bobbi Morse as confident and smart, and the result was a fun mystery thriller with gorgeous art. The series also featured some of my favorite colors and covers this year, by Rachelle Rosenberg and Joelle Jones.

By the time I write my 2017 list, I might be over Mockingbird’s cancellation.

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2. Bitch Planet by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Val DeLandro

2016 was light on Bitch Planet–only four issues were released throughout the year–but continued to provide insightful and relevant commentary in what turned out to be a period of rapid change in the real-life political landscape.

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1. Monstress by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda

Monstress started strong in 2015 and only got better. The main character, Maika, is a teenage girl living with a monster inside, something she learns to live with and use to her advantage as the plot develops. Monstress is full of unrepentant female characters set in a stunningly rendered fantasy world.

Shutter #25 Crossover Event: Special Brandon Graham Variant Cover Revealed

Image Comics has revealed Brandon Graham’s special variant cover of Shutter #25, the highly anticipated crossover event in the fan-favorite series written by Joe Keatinge and illustrated by Leila del Duca.

For those that missed it, Shutter #25 will celebrate the 25 year history of Image Comics.

Shutter #25 Cover A by Leila del Duca and Owen Gieni, as well as Shutter #25 Cover B by Brandon Graham, will hit comic book stores Wednesday, December 28th. Final order cutoff deadline for retailers is Monday, December 5th.

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Milestone Shutter Issue Features Rare Crossover of Legendary Image Characters

Critically-acclaimed ongoing series Shutter by Joe Keatinge and Leila del Duca will feature a rare crossover event to incorporate legendary Image Comics characters from the classic series Spawn, created by Todd McFarlane; Glory, created by Rob Liefeld; Witchblade, created by Marc Silvestri, editor David Wohl, writer Brian Haberlin, and artist Michael Turner; Savage Dragon, created by Erik Larsen; Invincible, created by Robert Kirkman and Cory Walker; and Shadowhawk, created by Jim Valentino.

Shutter #25 is a landmark issue for the popular pandimensional adventure series, but it will also celebrate Image Comics’ 25th anniversary with this exceptional moment in Image Comics history.

Fans dare not miss the terrifying biscuits-and-gravy secret no one will see coming in Shutter #25. Here, Shutter will kick off 2017 with these founding heroes meeting up with the cast of Shutter’s beloved character ensemble for what may prove to be one of their most delicious adventures yet.

Shutter #25 Cover A by Leila del Duca and Owen Gieni, as well as Shutter #25 Cover B by Brandon Graham, will hit comic book stores Wednesday, December 28th.

shutter-25

Review: Shutter #20

shutter_20-1Shutter has taken a noticeably experimental turn, first with issue #19 and again this month with #20. Where last month’s chapter showcased three of Kate Kristopher’s siblings’ histories at once in a triptych layout, Shutter #20 develops one of Kate’s other siblings.

Once again, Kate is faced with difficult decisions as she decides how best to proceed in the fight against Prospero. Readers (and Kate herself) are still processing the information Kate’s grandfather has given her, and while it has put the brakes on the actual fighting for a while, it has given the creative team a chance to develop the characters significantly.

This arc has accomplished a lot of character development, bringing Kate’s siblings to the forefront with her, and has also given the team a chance to be more experimental in their storytelling. The experimentation isn’t necessary to make the story interesting, since the complex narrative, worldbuilding, and characters do that on their own, but it does help to strengthen the personalities of the characters. Kate is still very much at the center of the story, but the reader is also getting more of a sense of who the rest of the Kristopher siblings are through the way in which each sibling’s story is told.

Shutter #20 is still penciled by Leila del Duca, who seems to get better each issue. Each character has a unique perspective, and this part of the story, largely told in a collaborative effort between Kate and the General is illustrated simply, with minimal detail. Colorist Owen Gieni keeps the palette simple with flat, bright colors, lending the new character a history tinted with innocence and a youthfulness that hasn’t really been present elsewhere in the story. The alternative art style is somewhat reminiscent of Emi Lenox’s flashback art in Nowhere Men, a charming interlude to the story. Though different from previous issues, the art team remains consistently awesome in color, illustration, and giving the characters life and personality.

Once again, writer Joe Keatinge leaves readers with no clue as to where the story will go next. It is clear that a conflict with Prospero is drawing closer, but the back of issue #20 teases “the final three” in reference to the last of the siblings Kate doesn’t know. Other characters like Cassius and Chris Kristopher Sr. have been noticeably absent from the narrative, building a sense of intrigue regarding their whereabouts. Despite all the answers Shutter has given, it largely remains a mystery.

Story: Joe Keatinge Art: Leila del Duca
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Shutter #19

shutter_19-1The last issue of Shutter left readers on the precipice of action, with Kate ready to lead her siblings and friends into battle with Prospero. It was something of a breather for the series, which has been necessarily action heavy so far. Writer Joe Keatinge takes Shutter #19 in a different direction with an issue that has been a long time coming.

This issue can be read one of two ways, as artist Leila del Duca says in the backmatter. Readers finally learn more about the background of Kate Kristopher’s siblings. Instead of its usual structure of a varying number of panels per page, Shutter #18 sticks to a format of three-panel pages and runs with a color theme unique to this issue.

Each panel (top, middle, bottom) has a monochromatic color scheme and tells the story of a different Kristopher sibling (Chris Kristopher Jr., The Leopard, and Kalliyan Phy). Because of this, the story can be read by reading the entire page at once, or by following the top, middle, or bottom panel in order to read one character’s story at a time. Both are equally accessible, but reading one panel at a time highlights the disparities in each sibling’s upbringing. This format and subject, while answering questions, also keeps the reader guessing at why and how this came to be. The question of why Kate’s upbringing was so different from her siblings’ is partially answered, but the mystery of the series isn’t totally gone.

Colorist Owen Gieni and Leila del Duca get to experiment with art on this issue, and the cover is something of a preview for the story. The monochromatic color theme associated with each character keeps the story coherent, letting it build to a climactic finish.

Shutter‘s art is wonderfully consistent, and del Duca is a talented artist and a credit to the comic industry. The story is regaining momentum, but there’s no clear hint as to where it will go, something that Keatinge has done–and continues to do–well.

Story: Joe Keatinge Art: Leila del Duca Colors: Owen Gieni
Story: 8.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Shutter #18

shutter_18-1Joe Keatinge and Leila Del Duca’s Shutter returns this week in its first issue since November. The third volume was released in trade paperback form last month, and hopefully readers are all caught up because this issue isn’t one to miss.

So far, Shutter has been incredibly action-heavy, even though that action is necessary to the plot. Keatinge is a master in carrot and stick, teasing the readers with enough information to keep the story on the right side of line between “still incredibly intriguing” and “frustrating.” Until now, many, many questions have gone unanswered because the reader learns information as Kate learns it, though this changes when she “learns everything” from her grandfather. While Shutter #17 did bring the arc to a dramatic climax, the reader learned almost nothing about what Kate’s grandfather showed her. Shutter #18 doesn’t leave the reader entirely in the dark, revealing just enough to answer a few burning questions.

In terms of pace, this issue is something of a necessary pause. It slows the action enough to delve into Kate’s history, namely the unaddressed ten-year gap between her father’s “death” and the present story. Shutter #18 gives depth to the relationship between Kate and Alain and Kate and Huckleberry, and begins to explain Alain’s resentment toward Huckleberry.

Kate doesn’t back down from her decision to “end the world,” and together with the sinister turn of heart that Cassius/Alarm Cat has taken and the life-changing information Kate has learned from her grandfather, this issue gives the sense of being  the calm before the storm.

If seeing more of Kate’s past was a highlight of the issue, Leila Del Duca’s art was the other, equally awesome highlight, as she continues to totally nail the art. The characters are livened with dynamic facial expression and movement, never seeming too stiff or still on the page.

Though the beginning of the arc may seem somewhat slow, the tension in this issue has a chance to simmer and build, suggesting that Kate and company will truly have some rough storms to weather before Shutter sees its end.

Story: Joe Keatinge Art: Leila Del Duca
Story: 8 Art: 9.7 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

JR4_Cover B by Keith BurnsWednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Mr. H

Top Pick: Spider-Man #1 (Marvel Comics) – Finally Miles Morales in his own stand alone book in the Prime Universe! Very excited for this one. With Peter Parker as his mentor will the old Parker luck rub off on our hero? Or will he reach new heights? Maybe an internship at Parker Industries awaits? Come and see Web heads!

Action Comics #49 (DC Comics) – Did Clark survive his Kryptonite overdose? Can he stand up to Vandal Savage? Find out here…

Green Lantern #49 (DC Comics) – The race to 50 is on.. is Hal ready for the coming of Parallax?

We are Robin #8 (DC Comics) – More like we are Joker this month. Let’s see how the social media treats a gang of villains rather than the fledgling heroes. One question needs to be asked “Why so serious?”

 

Ashley

Top Pick: The Wicked + The Divine Vol. 3 (Image Comics) – Initially thought to be a low arc due to the use of guest artists, the “Commercial Suicide” arc ended up being a brilliant and heartbreaking arc that focused more on the other characters we don’t get to see as much of in the bigger scheme of WicDiv. Exploring issues of fate, misogyny, pop stardom, cultural appropriation, and death, this experimental arc demonstrated WicDiv’s staying power.

Batgirl #48 (DC Comics) – There’s only two things I know about this issue. One, Black Canary is back in town and teaming up with Babs. Two, BABS TARR FINALLY GOT TO DRAW A LUCHA BATGIRL. Kalisto is US Champion, Lucha Underground is back, and there is an actual Luchador Batgirl costume now. What a time to be alive.

Captain Marvel #2 (Marvel) – Exhale everyone, Carol is just as lively and hardheaded as ever in the hands of Butters and Fazekas. Not to mention those abs by Anka. While it hasn’t made me cry yet, the series has me intrigued with its new use of Alpha Flight and the mystery reveal of the skeleton crew from the last issue. It’ll be interesting to see just what is in store for Carol at this “desk job.”

Pretty Deadly #8 (Image Comics) – I have a special place in my heart for the Deconnick/Ríos/Bellaire supernatural western, but this arc has been breathtaking both in story and art. Now, we finally get to meet the Reaper of War and maybe figure out just what his deal is.

Rocket Raccoon and Groot #2 (Marvel) – The first run at the Rocket Raccoon comic was an absolutely uproarious affair that made it one of my favorite Marvel titles. Skottie Young and Filipe Andrade seem to be taking a slightly different route this time with Rocket not knowing who he is after his death in Secret Wars, but the humor still seems to be there.

 

Alex

Top Pick: Johnny Red #4 (Titan Comics) – I love this series, and I’ve been counting down the days to each issues release. It is a fantastic World War II era story that highlights the struggles faced in Russia around that time, coupled with some truly stunning visual techniques.

Howard The Duck #4 (Marvel) – If not for Old Man Logan, this would be the only Marvel book I’d be reading, and that’s thanks in a large part to writer Chip Zdarsky’s occasional digs at Marvel’s reboots and events over the past year or so. I’ve been told that this series doesn’t hold up quite as well as Steve Gerber’s first volume, but if you don’t have that basis for comparison (and I don’t, yet) then the current run on Howard The Duck will be highly enjoyable.

Klaus #3 (BOOM! Studios) – Talking about visually stunning, Klaus is fantastic. It may be billed as an origin story for Santa (and it is), but this comic is so much more than that. There’s a warmth here that you really must experience.

Swamp Thing #2 (DC Comics) – When I was initially getting this list ready, it never occurred to me that Swamp Thing #2 would be one of my top five picks this week. But then I saw the comic listed on Previews website a coming out and I got unreasonably excited to read it after I remembered the slower paced, modern feeling with almost classical twist of the first issue. Who’da known?

X-O Manowar #44 (Valiant) – I wasn’t, honestly, all that impressed with the last issue of this series. It wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t as good as it has been lately. Hopefully it was a slower start to the new arc and not something indicative of a trend. This issue will go a long way to assuaging my fears, so I’m eager to get a chance to read it.

 

Madison

Top Pick: Pretty Deadly #8 (Image) – Pretty Deadly is one of my forever favorites. Emma Ríos’s art is otherworldly, and I’m excited to see where the story goes as they continue to develop the new arc.

Batgirl #48 (DC Comics) – This week’s Batgirl looks especially promising–it has both the return of Black Canary and one of the cutest covers possibly ever.

Paper Girls #5 (Image Comics) – Paper Girls might take an issue or two to really get into–the action starts quickly and doesn’t stop when four girls are attacked on their paper route. However, as with most Brian K. Vaughan stories, it’s worth seeing through.

Shutter #18 (Image Comics) – Shutter is a great subversion of the adventure genre, but the real draw for me was the art. If you haven’t read Shutter, you might recognize Leila Del Duca from the recent and absolutely gorgeous Morrigan-centric issue of The Wicked + The Divine.

 

Paul

Top Pick: A-Force #2 (Marvel) – A-Force is assembling and I’m excited to see them together again.  True, it won’t be no holds barred like it was in Secret Wars, but it looks like it’s going to be a fun ride; and I’m really enjoying seeing things from Singularity’s point of view; she wants her friends back and is doing what she can to find them, even with a big bad energy monster on her tail.  To paraphrase Iron Man, she’s bringing the party to them!

Scarlet Witch #3 (Marvel) – I’m not all in on this title going into the third issue.  Yes, I love Wanda.  She is one of my favourite characters.  The debut issue was alright, and issue two was less than that.  So why is this on my pick of the week list?  I’m holding out hope this title picks up, and I do have a soft spot for Wanda.  There are some good ideas here, and I hope it gets a little more interesting.

Uncanny Avengers #5 (Marvel) – It’s no secret to many how I feel about this title.  So why is it on my list?  Gambit is on the cover.  That is the only reason I’m looking forward to it this week.  I’m curious to see what role he’ll play with the team and with Rogue.

The Vision #4 (Marvel) – Still the surprise hit, for me, from the All New All Different launch.  Vision just wanted to live a life with a wife and kids, what could possibly go wrong?  The reader is given very grim hints that plenty goes wrong.  Not to mention Vision’s own wife and kids have things happen to them, which they keep from him, that show us that they are a lot more like us then people would think.  It’s a great read that I highly recommend.

 

Javier

Top Pick: Sheriff of Babylon #3 (DC Comics/Vertigo) – Tom King has had the Midas Touch, as anything he writes turns into liquid comic book gold.  This militaristic detective story is a solid read.

Bad Moon Rising #5 (451 Media) – The end is near. Only two issues left in the series. It’s Werewolves versus full automatics and Silver Bullets. I got five to one odds on the Biker Werewolves.

Paper Girls #5 (Image Comics) – I’m just waiting for one of the Paper Girls to be like, “I want my two dollars!!” They deserve a little more, after all that they’ve been through so far.

Unfollow #4 (DC Comics/Vertigo) – Bruce Lee’s Game of Death meets Social Media as the Chosen gather together to thin the herd. Or will they rise above their human faults?

The Walking Dead #151 (Image Comics) – Who cares that  I am front running on the Zombie genre.  A real war is coming as General Rick builds his army.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Johnny Red #4 (Titan Comics) – This seriously has gotten better and better with each issue and has been filled with action and a lot of touching interaction of the characters. Garth Ennis is knocking it out of the park with this series focused on an English pilot leading a Russian squad in WWII. The story is good, and the art is even more amazing. Some of the two page spreads are just jaw dropping.

Last Man: The Chase (First Second) – Such a fun graphic novel series. I’m excited to see more and more as the world is expanded upon and we learn what’s going on. It’s a hell of a mystery so far with small clues that make you scratch your head.

Nailbiter #20 (Image Comics) – One of my favorite series. This arc has some of the cast in Georgia trying to catch a serial killer who may have ties to Buckaroo. Just a fun comic about serial killers.

Princeless: Raven Pirate Princess #5 (Action Lab Entertainment) – Somehow this spinoff series has surpassed the original it came out of. Raven is one of my favorite new characters of the past few years and the fun flows off the page. Every issue has delivered.

Tomboy #3 (Action Lab: Danger Zone)Princeless for adults? This series has a teenage girl turned vigilante. The first two issues blew me away and I can’t wait to read the third. This is one that was one of my favorite debuts of 2015.

Shutter sets out on new story arc in February

Shutter #18Writer Joe Keatinge, artist extraordinaire Leila Del Duca, and colorist Owen Gieni will launch a new story arc in their ongoing globe-trotting urban fantasy series Shutter this February.

Previously in Shutter, Kate Kristopher, once the most famous explorer of an Earth far more fantastic than the one we know, was forced to return to the adventurous life she left behind when a family secret threatened to destroy everything she spent her life protecting.

In Shutter #18, Kate knows everything—and we don’t! The first issue in a new chapter, “All Roads,” that sheds light on the past Kate (and company) tried to leave behind, and where they’re going next. 

All roads converge. Not everyone survives the trip.

Shutter #18 (Diamond code: DEC150549) hits stores Wednesday, February 3rd. Final order cutoff deadline for retailers is Monday, January 11th.

Preview: Shutter #13

Shutter #13

Story By: Joe Keatinge
Art By: Leila Del Duca
Art By: Owen Gieni
Cover By: Leila Del Duca
Cover By: Owen Gieni
Cover Price: $3.50
Digital Price: $2.99
Diamond ID: MAY150503
Published: July 8, 2015

SHUTTER YEAR TWO BEGINS HERE! The next major stage begins here by introducing SHUTTER’s most important character since Kate herself.

Shutter13_Cover

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