Tag Archives: she-hulk

She-Hulk Smashes Into Hasbro’s Marvel Legends

Jennifer Walters mutates into She-Hulk, a massive, muscled green hero with boundless strength and the will to do good! This 6-inch Marvel Legends Series She-Hulk features multiple points of articulation and is a great addition to any action figure collection. This boxed figure includes open hands in addition to closed fists for punching and smashing. Two heads are included – one angry, and one not-so-angry.

The figure is available for pre-order now.


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Marvel Studios Releases New Details on Hawkeye, Shang-Chi, Captain Marvel 2, Armor Wars, Ironheart, Secret Invasion… and Fantastic Four!

During the Disney investor presentation, numerous announcements were made as to what to expect from Marvel Studios over the next years. Numerous first looks were released and updates to movies, television shows, and a whole lot of reveals.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings has wrapped its production. The film is in theaters July 9, 2021.

Brie Larson will return as Carol Danvers/Captain Marvel in Captain Marvel 2. Nia DaCosta will direct the film and Larson will be joined by Iman Vellani, the new Ms. Marvel, and Teyonah Parris who will play Monica Rambeau. Parris will debut as the character in WandaVision.

Captain Marvel 2 will fly into theaters November 11, 2022.

Hawkeye is currently filming. Jeremy Renner returns as the character and will be joined by Hailee Steinfeld as Kate Bishop.

Additional cast include Vera Farmiga, Fra Fee, and newcomer Alaqua Cox as Maya Lopez, with episodes directed by Rhys Thomas and directing duo Bert and Bertie.

Tatiana Maslany is now confirmed as Jennifer Walters/She-Hulk… and Tim Roth is joining her!? Roth returns as the Abomination. Mark Ruffalo will also appear on the Disney+ series. It will be directed by Kat Coiro and Anu Valia.

Moon Knight is confirmed though no more details have been released.

Samuel L. Jackson is back as Nick Fury in the Disney+ series, Secret Invasion. Ben Mendelsohn will return as well as the Skrull Talos.

Dominique Thorne will step into the armor as Riri Williams in Ironheart! The character is coming to a series soon on Disney+.

Ironheart and… Armor Wars!? Don Cheadle suits up again as James Rhodes, aka War Machine. The classic story comes to the small screen of Disney+ as Tony Stark’s fear of his tech falling into the wrong hands comes true.

Hopefully it’ll be as much of a trainwreck as the Star Wars special, but in 2022 we’re getting The Guardians of the Galaxy Holiday Special directed and written by James Gunn. You’ll be able to watch it on Disney+.

I am Groot! Baby Groot will get a series of shorts on Disney+.

Christian Bale has officially joined the cast of Thor: Love and Thunder as the villain Gorr the God Butcher. This will have a major impact on the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Thor: Love and Thunder comes to theaters on May 6, 2022.

Peyton Reed will return to direct the third Ant-Man film, Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania. Paul Rudd, Evangeline Lilly, Michael Douglas, and Michelle Pfeiffer all return. Kathryn Newton joins the cast as Cassie Lang and Jonathan Majors as Kang the Conqueror.

And… the Fantastic Four are coming to the Marvel Cinematic Universe directed by Jon Watts!

Around the Tubes

Dune: House Atreides #1

It’s a new week and we’ve got a bunch coming at you! To start the week, we’ve got news from around the web in our morning roundup. Check out some news and reviews as you start your day!

WETM – Comic book industry thriving amid the pandemic – Good to see some positive news.

The Beat – Tatiana Maslany says she’s not playing She-Hulk – wait, what? – Huh.

Reviews

Monkeys Fighting Robots – Dune: House Atreides #1
NPR – Maids
How to Love Comics – Smoove City
Games Radar – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Last Ronin #1

Tatiana Maslany Nears a Deal for the Lead Role in Marvel’s She-Hulk

Tatiana Maslany
Tatiana Maslany – Emmy Studio – Photograph by Peter Yang on April 7, 2018 in Los Angeles, CA

Orphan Black star Tatiana Maslany looks to be the lead choice for Marvel’s She-Hulk series that will air on Disney+. Kat Coiro will also direct several episodes of the series including the pilot. Jessica Gao will lead the writers room.

She-Hulk is Jennifer Walters, an attorney and cousin to Bruce Banner who gains her cousin’s power after a blood transfusion. But, unlike her cousin, she’s able to keep her intelligence and personality easier.

With a career that goes back decades, Maslany had a star-making turn in the cult series Orphan Black in 2013 which ran until 2017. Maslany was nominated for three Emmys and a Golden Globe during the show’s run, winning the Emmy for best actress in a drama series in 2016. She was recently seen and praised for her role as Sister Alice McKeegan in Perry Mason.

This won’t be the first comic based character she has stepped into the role for. The actress voiced the character Redcoat for the Captain Canuck animated series that ran from 2013 to 2014.

She-Hulk is one of numerous Marvel series coming to Disney+. Falcon and the Winter Soldier, WandaVision, Loki, Hawkeye, Ms. Marvel, and Moon Knight are all in the works or coming soon.

(via Variety)

Workers of the world! Here’s a list of comics to celebrate your Labor Day

Ah, the pleasures of having Labor Day off to celebrate work. It’s a contradiction as old as time, where honoring work means taking a (well-deserved and utterly necessary) break from it. After all, most workers have jobs that go year-round and the daily grind does take a toll. A day off is the least that can be afforded to them.

Recognition is the other thing we should doling out in industrial quantities during this federal holiday. As such, comic books are filled with stories about the fruits of labor, both in a literal and a politically figurative sense. Be it by actually exploring the hardships of being a worker to acknowledging the monumental task that is organizing movements in support of them, labor is central to the motivations behind some of comic’s best stories.

Here’s a short list of comics that either directly or indirectly showcase the roles workers play in keeping life and society functional. These comics dive headfirst into the specifics of what ‘putting in the work’ means, recognizing that everything that’s done in the service of others usually rests on human struggles both painful and exhausting. The comics below give workers their time in the spotlight so we can appreciate just how much it takes to go out and keep the world turning.

Labor Day Comics
Trashed

1. Trashed, written and illustrated by Derf Backderf

This book can best be described as a sobering love letter to one of the most underappreciated and openly repudiated jobs known to humankind: garbage collection. Following Backderf’s critically-acclaimed My Best Friend Dahmer, Trashed is based on the author’s time as a sanitation worker himself, surrounded by other workers just as enthused about collecting trash as he was (which wasn’t a whole lot). The inner workings of sanitation are presented through a combination of autobiographical anecdotes and well-researched facts and data that reveal just how complex, dangerous, and even clumsy picking up and storing trash can be. It’s a funny but scary look at how sanitation can save the world while also turn it into a ticking time bomb.

Damage Control

2. Damage Control, originally created by Dwayne McDuffie (W) and Ernie Colón (A)

A superhero’s job is to save the day, crumbling infrastructure be damned. With them, though, comes a unique concern for property damage, mostly focused on the inevitability of mass destruction. In comes a company solely dedicated to cleaning up after extinction-level battles and then putting the pieces back together called Damage Control. In essence, this Marvel comic is about unsung heroes. It’s about doing essential work knowing there’s no glory waiting at the end of it (much like Trashed, in some respects). McDuffie’s scripts are a masterclass on chaos and property politics, but it’s Colón’s attention to detail amidst the chaos that sets this story apart. The original series (there are a total of 4 series published) takes to a kind of MAD Magazine-style approach to comedy with visual gags and crude humor leading the charge, but it’s all well-orchestrated and it makes for reading that rewards those who scan comics pages whole multiple times.

Labor Day Comics
She-Hulk

3. She-Hulk: Law and Disorder, written by Charles Soule and illustrated by Javier Pulido

At a glance, Soule and Pulido’s She-Hulk gives the impression of being a kind of ‘slice of life’ story about a superhero that chooses law as her preferred battleground. The book, however, is about so much more, and it might have more in common with Damage Control than an actual legal drama. She-Hulk takes the anger-filled superhero and turns her into a working-class woman that’s trying (and struggling) to make her own legal services business work. She puts it all together from the ground up but is immediately confronted with the hardships of balancing work, heroics, and the semblance of a personal life on an even keel. One of the greatest, and most entertaining, aspects of the comic lies in the formation of the character’s legal practice and how at odds it can be being both a superhero and a normal person with other interests. It dives deep into the complications of working multiple jobs, but it shows an appreciation for those who lead their lives under that predicament. Soule and Pulido create a story that supports and applauds those who undertake the task of holding several jobs at once, honoring the sacrifice it requires of one’s self to survive it.

Labor Day Comics
Ex Machina

4. Ex Machina, written by Brian K. Vaughan and illustrated by Tony Harris

While aggressively political and metaphorical, Ex Machina does something few other stories on governmental responsibility manage to achieve: make the role of an elected official look and feel like a real job. The story follows Mitchel Hundred, a man that renounces his superhero persona to become mayor of New York city. After only managing to save one of the Twin Towers during the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Hundred realizes he can do more good as an elected official rather than as a superhero. Vaughan and Harris take full advantage of this setup to go beyond political speeches and discourse to get Hundred’s hands dirty with the real act of running a government. Hundred has to address the legality of surveillance in times of crisis, protocols for public demonstrations, controversial content in city museums, infrastructure, and police freedoms all while controlling the urge to use his still functioning superpowers to speed the process up. As is the case in She-Hulk, Hundred also attempts (with few successes) to balance his personal life with the job. Problem is, the job demands too much of his time, hence the temptation to use his powers. Ex Machina is a stark reminder that being an elected official actually means holding down a job with real consequences attached to it, something many politicians seem to have lost sight of.

Gotham Central

5. Gotham Central: In the Line of Duty, written by Ed Brubaker & Greg Rucka and illustrated by Michael Lark

The profession of law enforcement is under serious scrutiny at the present moment, and rightfully so, but it’s still a job certain men and women take on despite the complexities of outdated and dysfunctional practices that are in desperate need of revision. And that’s on top of the racial problems that have shaped its many, many systems. However, there are those who do take the job seriously and work hard to ‘protect and serve’ with the best of intentions under the law. Gotham Central prioritizes this viewpoint, focusing the cops and detectives that work in Batman’s Gotham City. Without the resources or the exceptions afforded to the Dark Knight, the GCPD is still tasked with responding to criminal activity, regardless of whether it’s of the supervillain type or not. Main characters René Montoya, Crispus Allen, Marcus Driver, and “Josie Mac” MacDonald, among others, are divided into day and night shifts in a city that is in a constant flux of crime. The job takes its toll on a personal level and there’s an emphasis on how much one gives in the line of duty, but there’s also an appreciation of honest cops walking the line in the face of overwhelming police corruption and abuse. It’s a complicated and sometimes contradictory read, but it makes no excuses while confronting the damning inconsistencies of the job.

Labor Day comics
Wooblies!: A Graphic History of the Industrial Workers of the World

6. Wooblies! A Graphic History of the Industrial Workers of the World, edited by Peter Buhle & Nicole Schulman

The Industrial Workers of the World, or IWW, has a wild and exuberant history, to say the least, which makes it the ideal subject for comic book storytelling. The IWW was created in Chicago, Illinois in 1905 as a union for marginalized workers led by Marxist principles. Miners, lumber workers, immigrant workers, indigenous workers, non-white workers, severely underrepresented female workers, and workers all over that had no rights or protections saw in the IWW as the means to fight towards better working conditions. Wooblies! (alluding to the nickname given to the members of the union) enlists the talents of cartoonists such as Peter Kuper, Harvey Pekar, Trina Robbins, Sharon Rudahl, Sue Coe, Carlos Cortez, among others to tell the story of how forgotten and underrepresented workers rose up against the odds to gain the rights and respect owed to them. The anthology has a very underground ‘comix’ feel to it, but it’s allegorical and metaphorical inclinations do a better job of capturing labor struggles better than a traditional story ever could. This might be the quintessential Labor Day reading right here.


Workers, laborers, holders of jobs, these comics honor your contributions, your efforts, and the near impossible feats you pull off. Read and relax, but overall, enjoy your hard-earned Labor Day holiday.

NYCC 2019: Hasbro Reveals New Marvel Legends including Fantastic Four, Deadpool, and Stan Lee

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH Figure Assortment

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Fall 2020)

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH SUNSPOT Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH SUNSPOT Figure

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH WARPATH Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH WARPATH Figure

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DEADPOOL BLUE & GOLD Figure

 (HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Fall 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL DEADPOOL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DEADPOOL BLUE & GOLD Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH Figure Assortment

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MR. FANTASTIC Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH MR. FANTASTIC Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH INVISIBLE WOMAN Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH INVISIBLE WOMAN Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH HUMAN TORCH Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH HUMAN TORCH Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH THING Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH THING Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH SHE-HULK Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH SHE-HULK Figure

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DOCTOR DOOM Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $19.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Available at most major retailers.

MARVEL FANTASTIC FOUR LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH DOCTOR DOOM Figure

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH STAN LEE Figure

(HASBRO/Ages 4 years & up/Approx. Retail Price: Starting at $24.99/Available: Spring 2020)

Fans, collectors, and kids alike can enjoy this MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH STAN LEE Figure, inspired by the creator of the AVENGERS himself, STAN “THE MAN” LEE! This high quality, realistic, 6-inch figure features premium design, detail, and multiple points of articulation, making it a great addition to any action figure collection. Inspired by STAN LEE’S cameo as a skeptical chess player in MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS, this figure includes a CAPTAIN AMERICA shield featuring STAN’S signature® and a chess board based on his iconic cameo in the film. Includes figure and 2 accessories. Available for pre-order at Target.

MARVEL LEGENDS SERIES 6-INCH STAN LEE Figure

Preview: She-Hulk Annual #1

She-Hulk Annual #1

(W) Alexandra Petri (A) Andy MacDonald (CA) Mirka Andolfo
Rated T
In Shops: Aug 28, 2019
SRP: $4.99

ACTS OF EVIL!

• Bullseye being hired for an assassination? Just another Tuesday. But when he decides to pin it on She-Hulk? Bad idea.
• Strap in as everyone’s favorite lawyer-slash-Hulk, Jennifer Walters, takes on the mad marksman in a classic case of character defamation…with a heaping helping of SMASH.
• Plus: Robots! Why? Well, you’ll just have to wait and see…

She-Hulk Annual #1

Ms. Marvel, Moon Knight, and She-Hulk Announced for Disney+ at D23

We knew there’d be some announcements at D23 and Marvel brought the goods with three new series for the streaming service. Marvel Studios has announced television shows based on Ms. Marvel, Moon Knight, and She-Hulk. All three are known to have been in the works or have been mentioned by Marvel Studios honcho Kevin Feige.

What is new is interesting is that some of these shows were assumed to be movies, Ms. Marvel especially. Moon Knight and She-Hulk were both rumored to be in the running for shows on Netflix before that deal went south.

British writer Bisha K. Ali has been tapped for Ms. Marvel to write and act as showrunner. It is assumed the series will star Kamala Khan, an Inhuman who took on the mantle from her idol Carol Danvers (though in the Marvel Cinematic Universe Danvers has never gone by Ms. Marvel.

She-Fulk first appeared in Savage She-Hulk #1 and was created by Stan Lee and John Buscema. Jennifer Walters is the cousin of Bruce Banner and in the comics gained her powers due to a blood transfusion. She’s also a lawyer balancing her life as a lawyer and superhero.

She-Hulk

Moon Knight was created by Doug Moench and Don Perlin and debuts in Werewolf by Night #32 in 1975. Marc Spector is a former Marine turned mercenary and near death is offered a chance at life if he becomes the god Khonshu’s avatar on Earth. What’s notable is Spector is Jewish, the son of a rabbi.

Moon Knight

Kamala Khan is the newest of the three characters debuting in Captain Marvel #14 in 2013. Created by Sana Amanat, G. Willow Wilson, and Adrian Alphona, the character is a New Jersey Muslim teenager who’s also Inhuman and gains her powers after Terrigen Mist is unleashed around the world.

Ms. Marvel

These shows are all under the Marvel Studios banner showing the expansion of the power and reach of that arm of Marvel and its head Kevin Feige.

These shows are in addition to the already announced The Falcon and Winter Soldier, WandaVision, Loki, and Hawkeye which will all debut beginning in late 2020 and throughout 2021.

In other Marvel Studios news, Kit Harrington is rumored to be joining the Marvel Cinematic Universe and Wyatt Russell will join The Falcon and Winter Solider as John F. Walker, aka U.S. Agent.

Messages from Midgard #12- Analog Iron Man

With only a single issue left in the War of the Realms core series, the tie-in writers have fallen into the unenviable trap of wrapping up their story, connecting it to the event’s inevitable conclusion, and maybe leaving a loose thread or two when their comic returns to its normally scheduled programming.

Six comics came out this week, and one was heads and shoulders over the pack: War of the Realms Journey into Mystery #5. The McElroys, Andre Araujo, and Chris O’Halloran have finished crafting an ensemble cast that I want to read an ongoing series about, made Ares sympathetic, Laussa more than a MacGuffin, connect all the seemingly random plot threads of the series, and made me laugh out loud a couple times. No other book came close to this, but with snark, grit, and one hell of a Wasp cameo, Gail Simone and Paolo Villanelli made up for last month’s disappointment and delivered a nifty science vs magic clash in Tony Stark, Iron Man #13. I enjoyed it and wish Simone had more time on the book.


War of the Realms: War Scrolls #3

War of the Realms’ anthology tie-in War Scrolls wraps up with its third issue. There is the conclusion to Jason Aaron, Andrea Sorrentino, and Matthew Wilson’s Daredevil serial as well as a Dr. Doom story from Christopher Cantwell, Cian Tormey, and Dan Brown and a She-Hulk one from Charlie Jane Anders, Simone D’Armini, and Federico Blee. Daredevil, God without Fear continues to be an accomplishment in panel layouts, fight scenes, and theodicies. This three part story is a turning point in Sorrentino’s career as an artist as he transitions from flowing tapestry layouts to strict grids that work like slow-mo while Daredevil fights Malekith with Bifrost shruikens. Aaron’s narration continues to show the perils of omniscience, and even if Daredevil can’t defeat Malekith, he can inspire his blind children hostage to escape and cut God a break along the way.

Halt and Catch Fire co-creator Christopher Cantwell tells the story of the Dark Elf invasion of Latveria from ordinary citizens’ POVs. Dr. Doom has a godlike status in this country, and even when he makes silly mistakes like wasting his troops on a Saving Private Ryan-esque rescue mission, they look to him to save them. The switching point of views can be disorienting, but Cian Tormey gives the story a documentary feel and builds to one badass crescendo where Doom is part-Superman, part-God of the Old Testament, and still authoritarian. It’s a tasting menu that really needs to be expanded to a full feast of the regular lives of Latverians.

War Scrolls #3 wraps up with a story of She-Hulk and Freyja fighting dragons and talking about relationships. Charlie Jane Anders’ writing sometimes feels like she’s making her characters have her interests like making Blade a Beyonce fan and Punisher a Joni Mitchell aficionado, but she nails the conversations between Jennifer and Freyja. She-Hulk talks about how she is dating Thor and not sure how serious it is, and Freyja understands how much She-Hulk cares for her son and that they are both insecure about their “worthiness” and status as heroes. The cherry on top of this pretty good story is D’Armini’s artwork that makes She-Hulk incredibly muscular and monstrous. For the most part, War Scrolls has been full of thought provoking character studies and memorable visuals, and issue three is no exception earning an Overall Verdict of Buy.


War of the Realms: Journey into Mystery #5

Journey into Mystery #5 wraps up this god demon baby starring road trip saga into a neat little bow and uses continuity to enhance and deepen character development and humor instead of as a crutch. The McElroys seamlessly transition from podcasting to mainstream comics while Andre Araujo and Chris O’Halloran enhance their jokes and punch up the action scenes beginning with Wonder Man sweeping to save Laussa. They keep their character portrayals internally consistent like having Wonder Man continue to be a pacifist and having Sebastian Druid being uncertain about his powers, but reminding readers he had a relationship with Ares’ son back in Jonathan Hickman’s Secret Warriors.

This kibble of continuity isn’t just a piece of cute, fanboy trivia, but sets up Ares’ road for redemption. He isn’t a bad guy and doesn’t have a quarrel with this book’s cast; he just like to fight and wants to be reunited with son in the afterlife. Journey into Mystery #5 isn’t just a slugfest between the team and Ares, but is filled with twists and turns about Laussa that aren’t 100% deus ex machinas. The comic does have a pleasing plot, but its real magic are in the small moments like any time Miles Morales and Thori interact, or Laussa’s expressions with the world around him. And for this mastery of both the macro and micro aspects of comics, Journey into Mystery #5, and by extension, the whole miniseries earn an Overall Verdict of Buy.


War of the Realms: Spider-Man & the League of Realms #3

Unless it’s for a storytelling purpose, having two or more artists on a comic usually means it was rushed to meet its deadline, and that seems to be the case with Spider-Man & the League of Realms #3. Gone are Nico Leon’s slick cartooning and well-choreographed set pieces of the previous two issues, and writer Sean Ryan giving each League member a distinct personality beyond fantasy race action figure. This issue is mostly a slugfest against Malekith’s lieutenant, Kurse and peppered with awkward poses, constipated facial expressions, and basically, generic visuals from Leon and Marco Failla.

The angel Fernande goes a bit ballistic in the middle of the fight, and Spider-Man finds a shared connection because they have both lost loved ones. But this was already covered in the previous issue so it feels a lot like padding in Spider-Man & the League of Realms #3. The main plot point of this issue (and a cool connection to War Scrolls #3) is that Kurse was once League member, Waziria, and for the first time in all of War of the Realms (Except the Cul Borson story in Thor.), the Dark Elves aren’t treated like evil cannon fodder. In the end, this comic was about saving people instead of punching evil, and that’s a good sentiment from Ryan and Leon. However, it ends on this week’s “standard” heroes pose together and jump into the final battle panel and earns an Overall Verdict of Pass because of art issues and the difficulty of writing a large cast.


Captain Marvel #7

Spider-Man & the League of Realms #3 wasn’t the worst “War of the Realms” comic this week. That honor goes to Captain Marvel #7, which wraps up the unbearably banal if well-colored by Tamra Bonvillain body swap story featuring Carol Danvers and Dr. Strange. This issue does have a few positives like Kelly Thompson’s gift for quick banter and cutting one-liners like Strange roasting Carol for only knowing magic from various pop culture things. However, it’s pretty shallow, Strange and Carol’s ineptitude with each other’s powers are quickly resolved, and afterwards, they and an underutilized Black Widow go separate ways.

One slight positive about Captain Marvel #7 is Annapaola Martello’s art. She’s equally good at drawing fun facial expressions/hints of flirting and things that go boom/pew pew. Even if the story is thin, it’s pure joy to see Dr. Strange in Carol’s body go Binary and kick undead ass and then steal a little moment at the end. And about the ending, it seems random and tacked on even if it’s our first glimpse of a post-War of the Realms world. Carol is hanging out in her apartment like everything is normal, and the last story had no effect on her. Honestly, this is for the better as Thompson no longer has to shoehorn a quick tie-in and can tell her full story. My Overall Verdict for Captain Marvel #7 is Pass, and it’s worth skipping for regular readers of her title and those just following “War of the Realms”.


Deadpool #14

If there’s any comic that Deadpool #14 shares DNA with, it’s Simon Bisley’s Lobo books of the 1990s with their combination of serious, detailed fantasy art and silly dialogue and situations. In this comic, Skottie Young and Nic Klein chronicle Deadpool’s defense of Australia from Ulik (Which is apparently a very common name for trolls.) and his minions with the help of a knock-off Captain Britain and Daredevil and then an assist from some real superheroes. Young continues to have fun breaking the fourth wall and poking fun at his own writing like ending the issue with a deus ex machina and commenting on the legality of including a figure that’s all but named Tasmanian Devil.

Nic Klein draws and colors his own work in Deadpool #14 and turns in some gorgeous splash pages of Deadpool, Luke Cage, Iron Fist, Daredevil, and various Z-list Australian heroes beating the shit out of trolls. He can also do funny too like his depiction of the solution to Australia’s troll problem, which is feeding them and putting them to work at New Zealand’s copyright-friendly version of a Lord of the Rings set tour. The panel of trolls chasing tourists with selfie sticks around a “bobbit” hole is like something out of Mad magazine and a wonderful Deadpool-esque way to wrap up the plot. For its humor, skilled art, and ultraviolence, Deadpool #14 earns an Overall Verdict of Buy. (And, apparently, the next issue is the final one of the series.)


Tony Stark, Iron Man #13

Free of continuing subplot from previous issues (Except for the important Tony Stark relapsing in a VR environment one.), Gail Simone and Paolo Villanelli are free to tell the story of the battle between Iron Man and the wyrm Sadurang, who wants to rob the New York Stock Exchange. They make fantastic parallels between traders and hoarding dragons, and starting off a conversation between Sadurang and a now homeless broker about how riches cloud one’s morals sets the tone for the issue. And what happens is a back to basics Iron Man story where Tony must destroy or deactivate all his magic infected armor and get back to the analog days to defeat this greedy dragon.

Edgar Delgado’s powerful colors match Villanelli’s art, which can be loose and scratchy when Tony is getting his ass kicked and trying to quip his way out of a bad situation or tighter and tougher when he’s in the Mark I armor doing his best St. George impression. Also, Simone brings in the very winsome Wasp as a guest star in this issue, and she brings Tony hope and her stings and fast flying gives him enough time to rally his counterattack. Then, they get to share a sweet moment after the fight is over, but Tony doesn’t tell her about the relapse and is interrupted by Malekith’s initial invasion of New York. This two steps forward, one step forward approach to Tony’s journey works for Gail Simone and Paolo Villanelli and coupled with a satire of capitalism via knight/dragon metaphors, Tony Stark, Iron Man #13 earns an Overall Verdict of Buy.


Even though it’s sad to see Captain Marvel’s portrayal stumble in yet another event, and some writers love doing the “heroes join the final battle” ending to their tie-ins, this wasn’t a bad “War of the Realms” week. Skottie Young and Nic Klein turned their Deadpool two-parter into an exercise in maximum absurdity and pulled off the first funny Lord of the Rings reference of the event while Gail Simone added Iron Man to characters she excels at writing. But the real highlight was Journey into Mystery, which is a redemptive road comedy starring a great mix of heroes, tons of quick jokes, and a coherent plot that zigged where others zag. I’m definitely looking forward to Clint McElroy’s upcoming work on Marvel Team-Up.


Panel of the Week

Mark I armor, Ben Day dots, snarky Gail Simone dialogue. I’m geeking out, y’all. (From Tony Stark, Iron Man #13; Art by Paolo Villanelli and Edgar Delgado)

It’s Heroes vs. Villains in Epic Battles wit Acts of Evil

Last month, Marvel announced the debut of Acts of Evil – where Marvel’s most iconic heroes meet their match against some of Marvel’s most vicious villains! From Ms. Marvel to Venom, epic encounters will ensue as Marvel’s greatest heroes battle against enemies they have never faced before – leading to an outcome that no one will expect!

This month, Marvel is excited to debut the creative teams and stories for the titles debuting in August and September, along with new covers and a handy checklist to track all your favorite stories!

DEADPOOL ANNUAL #1: DEADPOOL VS. NIGHTMARE
Written by DANA SCHWARTZ
Art by REILLY BROWN
Cover by AARON KUDER

DEADPOOL ANNUAL #1: DEADPOOL VS. NIGHTMARE

SHE-HULK ANNUAL #1: SHE-HULK VS. BULLSEYE
Written by ALEXANDRA PETRI
Art by ANDY MACDONALD
Cover by MIRKA ANDOLFO

GHOST SPIDER ANNUAL #1: GHOST-SPIDER VS. ARCADE
Written by VITA AYALA
Art by PERE PEREZ

MOON KNIGHT ANNUAL #1: MOON KNIGHT VS. KANG
Written by CULLEN BUNN
Art by IBRAHIM MOUSTAFA

WOLVERINE ANNUAL #1: WOLVERINE VS. MORGAN LE FAY
Written by JODY HOUSER
Art by TBD

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