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Sequart Releases The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the Comics Art of Mike Mignola

The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the Comics Art of Mike Mignola

Sequart is releasing The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the Comics Art of Mike Mignola, edited by S.G. Hammond.

In 1993, Mike Mignola debuted Hellboy, beginning a universe that would expand to include hundreds of comics and characters. Today, the Mignolaverse is the largest creator-owned comics universe, inspiring multiple live-action movies, animated films, and video games.

The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the Comics Art of Mike Mignola, edited by S.G. Hammond, examines Mignola’s comics and the sprawling Mignolaverse mythos. The book explores Mignola’s artistic growth, collaborators, panel compositions, influences, and major themes, among other topics. It’s a must for any Mignola fan!

The book runs 196 pages and sports a cover by Mike Mignola himself! (Hellboy is a trademark of Mike Mignola and the cover art is used with permission.)

The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the Comics Art of Mike Mignola is available in print and on Kindle. (Just a reminder: you don’t need a Kindle device to read Kindle-formatted books; you can download a free Kindle reader for most computers, phones, and tablets.)

Watch Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts Now

Sequart Organization and Respect Films have announced that their feature-length documentary Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts is available to watch for free on YouTube.

Warren Ellis sees the future. He is a comic book writer and cyberpunk philosopher living on the edge of tomorrow. He speaks to a cult audience of artists, journalists, scientists and fans who hail him as INTERNET JESUS.

Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts features the most extensive interview ever given by Ellis. His acerbic wit and core belief in humanity come across like never before, revealing the unique point of view that has made him such a pivotal and influential figure to his massive audience of artists, journalists, scientists, and fans. Along with the man himself, the film features Academy Award-winner Dame Helen Mirren, Patton Oswalt, Joss Whedon, Darick Robertson, Ben Templesmith, Matt Fraction, Joe Quesada, Wil Wheaton, Brea Grant, Claudio Sanchez, Stoya, Andy Hurley, and a Warren Ellis Muppet!

Watch Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods for Free Now!

Sequart Organization and Respect Films have announced that their feature-length documentary Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods is now available to watch for free on YouTube.

Grant Morrison is one of the most poular writers in comics, and one of the most controversial. He is the Rock Star of comics, a philosopher and chaos magician who has used his comics to change both himself and his audience. He is a man living on the border between FICTION and REALITY, and this is his STORY.

Grant Morrison: Talking with Gods was produced in close collaboration with Morrison and features extensive interviews with him, as well as never-before-seen photos and documents spanning his childhood to the present day. Complimenting Morrison’s own words are interviews with his closest collaborators and friends, including Frank Quitely, Douglas Rushkoff, Cameron Stewart, Phil Jimenez, Mark Waid, Geoff Johns, Jill Thompson, and many more. The film makes extensive use of found and abstract footage to make the documentary feel like a Morrison comic.

She Makes Comics is Available to Stream on Netflix

Sequart Organization and Respect Films has announced that She Makes Comics is now available to stream from Netflix.

Directed by Marisa StotterShe Makes Comics traces the fascinating history of women in the comics industry. Despite popular assumptions about the comics world, women have been writing, drawing, and reading comics since the medium’s beginnings in the late 19th century. And today, there are scores of women involved in comics and its vibrant fan culture.

Featuring dozens of interviews with such vital figures as Ramona Fradon, Trina Robbins, Joyce Farmer, Karen Berger, Wendy Pini, Colleen Doran, Kelly Sue DeConnick, Raina Telgemeier, and Becky Cloonan, She Makes Comics is the first film to bring together the most influential women of the comics world.

The documentary has received rave reviews and won Best Documentary at the 2015 Comic-Con International Film Festival.

Humans and Paragons Explores Super-Hero Justice

Sequart Organization has announced the release of Humans and Paragons: Essays on Super-Hero Justice, edited by Ian Boucher.

Super-heroes, said to represent justice, have saturated popular culture at a time when the American criminal justice system is under intense public scrutiny and re-evaluation. Do the super-heroes we celebrate really represent the best we can be? How do the stories we tell ourselves about justice help society understand the endeavor of protecting citizens and making itself better?

In this book of essays, contributors from around the world explore these questions and more from many perspectives, encouraging a more conscious discussion about the most fundamental element of super-heroes.

The book runs 272 pages and features interviews with Mark Waid and Gerard Jones. The cover is by Mara MacMahon and Roni Setiawan. The book is now is available in print and on Kindle. (Just a reminder: you don’t need a Kindle device to read Kindle-formatted books; you can download a free Kindle reader for most computers, phones, and tablets.)

Watch Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts for Free

Sequart Organization and Respect Films have added the feature-length documentary Warren Ellis: Captured Ghosts for free on Sequart’s YouTube channel SequartTV.

Captured Ghosts features the most extensive interview ever given by Ellis and spans his first memory watching the moon landing as a child to the success of the RED film adaptation.

Along with the man himself, the film features Academy Award-winner Dame Helen Mirren, Patton Oswalt, Joss Whedon, Darick Robertson, Ben Templesmith, Matt Fraction, Joe Quesada, Wil Wheaton, Brea Grant, Claudio Sanchez, Stoya, Andy Hurley, and a Warren Ellis Muppet.

Sequart releases book on Planet of the Apes movies, TV, and novels!

Sequart Organization has released Bright Eyes, Ape City: Examining the Planet of the Apes Mythos, edited by Rich Handley and Joseph F. Berenato.

“A planet where apes evolved from men?”

With those horrified words, Charlton Heston’s Colonel George Taylor summed up exactly what viewers were thinking in 1968 the first time they saw Planet of the Apes in theaters. Loincloth-clad humans reduced to mute savages, living in cages or in the wild? Xenophobic orangutans, militaristic gorillas, and curious chimpanzees with a rigid class structure, Greco-Roman names, religious dogma, and the ability to speak and reason? What goes on here? It’s a madhouse!

Audiences were hooked — and they remain hooked almost five decades later. Planet of the Apes (based on Pierre Boulle’s French novel Monkey Planet) has spawned eight films, with a ninth currently in the works, as well as two television series and several novels. It’s one of the most respected franchises in pop-culture history, thanks to the talents of writers Rod Serling, Michael Wilson, Paul Dehn, John and Joyce Corrington, William Broyles Jr., Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silver, and Mark Bomback; directors Franklin J. Schaffner, Ted Post, Don Taylor, J. Lee Thompson, Tim Burton, Rupert Wyatt, and Matt Reeves; makeup artists John Chambers and Rick Baker; and a long list of beloved actors who have breathed life into some of the most memorable science-fiction characters ever to grace the large or small screen.

This anthology features insightful, analytical essays about the franchise’s long history, from popular film historians, novelists, bloggers, and subject-matter experts. If you’re eager to learn more about Apes lore, then you’ll need to get your stinkin’ paws on this book.

The book runs 308 pages and features a foreword by David Gerrold.

Bright Eyes, Ape City: Examining the Planet of the Apes Mythos is available in print and on Kindle.

Sequart’s Moving Target Takes on Green Arrow

Sequart Organization has released Moving Target: The History and Evolution of Green Arrow, by Richard Gray.

For 75 years, Green Arrow has been a part of the DC Comics world, working his way up from a supporting player to the star of a flagship television series. Yet for much of his career, he was a hero without a home, separate from his contemporaries, or unfavorably compared with a certain Dark Knight.

Whether it is the “cowboys and Indians” influences of the 1940s and 1950s, the rebellious realism of the 1970s, the darker edge of the 1980s, or the melodrama of his TV personas, Green Arrow has remained the conscience of the comics world, and perhaps an even better representative than Batman of what one person can do.

This collection is the definitive analysis of the Emerald Archer, from his Golden Age origins to his small screen adventures and beyond. Exploring overlooked chapters of Green Arrow’s life, and those of alter ego Oliver Queen, this book shows that Green Arrow has never been just one thing, but rather a perpetually moving target. Includes new interviews with Green Arrow creators from across the decades, including Neal Adams, Mike Grell, Chuck Dixon, Phil Hester, Brad Meltzer, and Jeff Lemire.

The book runs 338 pages and features a foreword by Phil Hester, in addition to the high-profile interviews mentioned above.

The book is now is available in print and on Kindle. (Just a reminder: you don’t need a Kindle device to read Kindle-formatted books; you can download a free Kindle reader for most computers, phones, and tablets.)

Book Review: Humans and Paragons: Essays on Super-Hero Justice

Justice in this world is never as simple as good guy gets bad guy. That would make life so easy, instead, it is a complex concept that no one rarely ever truly realizes, at least not in our lifetime. That is why comic books tend to provide so many different interpretations on how justice can be served, the interpretation initially in comics was as simple as I just explained but it became even more complex. In Ian Boucher and Sequart’s book, Humans and Paragons: Essays on Super-Hero Justice, he looks to explores what these concepts mean and how are enacted in comic books through superheroes.

In the first essay, “Four Color Mortality”, Paul Jaissle tackles what exactly shaped “good guys versus bad guys” trope and how it has affected the canon of the superhero overall and as he called brought “the simplistic moral framework of comics”. In “Keeping the Wolves at Bay”, Colby Pryor delves into the power of the uniform, and how government derives its power form the same concepts as it never fully realizes utopia while falling into dystopia, while referencing Alan Moore’s epic cautionary tale, Watchmen. In “Turtles on Trial”, John Loyd, goes about putting the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on trial for murder, exposing the double standards comic book fans have for heroes vice villains, for committing the same acts. In “Those Blessed and Those Not Blessed”, Jaime Infante Ramirez, gets into the six positions of lawful behavior that all the characters within his books surrounding Batman.

In “Defenders of the Status Quo”, Paul Jaissle tackles “notion of super-heroes representing a “deeper” conception of justice is an intrinsic part of their appeal”, whereby examining how we got to high moral pedestal we hold these heroes to. In “Super-Heroes: Threat or Menace? Why Super-Hero Justice Only Exists in Fiction”, Ross May gets into the practical reality of heroes like Batman and the Punisher., and how we would perceive them in real life. In “Four Things You Always Wanted to Know about the Joker (but were too Afraid to Ask),” Michal Siromski, he does a deep dive in to the Joker, and actually does as one of the most thorough examinations ever written on the character. In “Is the Truth Good Enough? Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy and the Noble Lie in Justice and Politics,” Daniel N. Gullotta gets into the many themes that have been looming over Batman’s canon and which have been brought more light by Christopher Nolan’s movies on the Dark Knight.

In “Must There Be Superman Movies?” Paul Jaissle does an interesting look on Superman’s unflappable moral code. In “Shadows Prove the Sunshine,” Rebecca Johnson gets into the moral core what makes a “dark hero”. In “Honing Our Senses: Remembering the Vibrancy of Super-Hero Justice,” Ian Boucher dives into the complex paradox of the character’s internal struggle, as they not fight cunning villains, they also must fight their inner selves, as in the example he used of Watchmen’s Rorschach. The last pieces of the book, is Boucher’s interview with Mark Waid and Gerard Jones, and where they discuss the concept of justice and its moral power over superheroes.

Overall, a commanding collection of essays that explores the human dichotomy of morals and justice, and how we expect superheroes to be better than us.

Essayists: Ian Boucher, Paul Jaissle, Colby Pryor, John Loyd, Jaime Infante Ramírez, Ross May, Michal Siromski, Daniel N. Gullotta, Rebecca Johnson
Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Sequart’s Book on Claremont’s 17-Year X-Men Run Now Available

claremont-x-men-book-coverSequart Organization is proud to announce the publication of The Best There is at What He Does: Examining Chris Claremont’s X-Men, by Jason Powell.

The X-Men franchise is a sprawling comics mythology, to which hundreds of creators have contributed over the past 50 years. The period from 1975 to 1991 is special, however, as the X-Men universe was guided by the voice of one writer, who wrote every single issue of The Uncanny X-Men during that span. His name is Chris Claremont, and he made the X-Men what it is today.

The Best There is at What He Does is an appreciation of the long-term narrative Claremont lovingly crafted month after month, over the course of nearly 17 years. Proceeding chronologically through the issues, this exhaustive overview analyzes the trends, arcs, and themes that emerge throughout his landmark comics opus.

The book is available in print and on Kindle. (Just a reminder: you don’t need a Kindle device to read Kindle-formatted books; you can download a free Kindle reader for most computers, phones, and tablets.) It runs 296 pages and features a foreword by Geoff Klock and a cover by Steven Legge.

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