Tag Archives: rob liefeld

Rob Liefeld Delivers a New Take on Cable for Major X

Major X Cable

In January, creator Rob Liefeld and Marvel announced Major X, the latest new spin on the X-Men universe. Major X comes from another existence called the X-instence, a mutant Shangri-La. It’s a world of peace and harmony. Something happens forcing Major X to land in the Marvel Universe but not in the spot he hoped for, he lands in 1991 and eventually makes his way to the modern-day Marvel world.

So, with a part of the multiverse to explore, we’re going to get new takes on classic characters as we’ve already seen with some of the teaser art.

Liefeld has now revealed a new take on another classic character, Cable. With his iconic scar and cybernetic arm, it’s an unmistakable new take on the character.

Rob Liefeld Teases More Major X with Some interesting Art

As announced last week by Marvel, Rob Liefeld is adding another chapter into the X Universe with the upcoming series Major X launching April.

The series sees a character from another dimension, Major X, come to the main Marvel Universe. Major X comes from another existence called the X-instence, a mutant Shangri-La. It’s a world of peace and harmony. Something happens forcing Major X to land in the Marvel Universe but not in the spot he hoped for, he lands in 1991 and eventually makes his way to the modern-day Marvel world.

Liefeld continues the tease with the release of new art that we can see below. In it we clearly see Wolverine with a nod to his brown and orange outfit, Cable, a Sentinel, Shatterstar, and from there… it looks like Avalanche, to Atlanteans and a grey Beast?

The art features colors by Romulo Fajardo Jr.

Major X

Preview: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Archive Vol. 2 SC

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Archive Vol. 2 SC

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writers:  Dan Slott, Tom and Mary Bierbaum, Robert L. Washington III, Stefan Petrucha
Artists: Todd Nauck, Ron Lim, Paulo Henrique
Cover Artist: Rob Liefeld
Price: $19.99

Experience the morphinominal, remastered comics that chronicle epic adventures from teams such as: Power Rangers Zeo, Power Rangers Turbo, Super Samurai, Megaforce and more!

Collects action-packed stories from Marvel, Image, Papercutz, and Hamilton Comics by a team of all-star writers including Dan Slott (The Amazing Spider-Man) and Tom and Mary Bierbaum (Legion of Super-Heroes), along with fan-favorite artists Todd Nauck (Young Justice), Ron Lim (Silver Surfer), and many more.

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers Archive Vol. 2 SC

Around the DC Universe: Titans Debuts

Welcome once again to Graphic Policy’s regular roundup of the best, the worst and the goofiest content on DC Universe, the premier subscription service for all things from DC Entertainment.

Originals

A new heading gets added to the feature this week with the much anticipated debut of Titans, the first DC Universe exclusive original series. Early reactions to the series’ teaser material was decidedly mixed with many fans decrying what appeared to be it’s dark and gritty tone and the open use of profanity, especially when associated with a franchise with many younger fans thanks to the animated series Teen Titans (also available on DC Universe) and Teen Titans Go!

I was honestly surprised by how much I enjoyed the premier episode. The show is indeed dark and gritty but the tone works really well to provide a fresh take on thirty year old material that has been adapted several times before.

In this iteration Titans is very much an examination of young people coping with trauma, a theme that is all too relevant in the wake of #metoo and a generation of young veterans suffering from PTSD. Raven (played by Tegan Croft) is the real standout of the show and much of what occurs is seen from her viewpoint, something that makes the tone very apropos. I was a little worried that they were going to draw Dick Grayson too far towards the rendition from All Star Batman and Robin but Brenton Thwaites retains an essential likeability and vulnerability even while brutally wading into criminals with no quarter asked or given. “Fuck Batman” was a shocking and needlessly edgy line in the trailer but in the context in which it used it did work for me. I’d go so far as to say that this portrayal of the “boy” wonder might be the definitive live action one for a generation.

If there’s a flaw in the first episode it’s that Anna Diop’s Starfire is too far divorced from Robin and Raven’s plotline for much of the runtime. I get the feeling they were trying to make her mysterious but she came across as more of a distraction than anything else. Hopefully their paths will dovetail together next week. While I’m mostly over the idea of R (or in this case TV MA) rated superheroes I think it does work here.

One episode is not enough to justify $75 for a year’s subscription but if the rest of the season is as good or better a month or two to binge the entire thing will certainly be worth it.

Comics

I’ve been busy catching up on analog comics for the last two weeks so I haven’t spent as much time reading on DC Universe as usual. One title I did get to finish though was Hawk and Dove (2011) by artist Rob Liefeld, scripted for the first five issues by Sterling Gates and done solo by Liefeld for the last three. Hawk and Dove‘s cardinal sin isn’t that it’s bad; it’s that its boring. At no point in this run do we get a sense of the characters as anything other than generic super heroes. There’s nothing compelling here, no reason why we should care what happens to anyone. The story also seems to be a continuation of threads laid down in a previous series, an odd choice given that the New 52 was supposed to be a fresh start for all but the most successful DC titles. It’s not even worth it for Liefeld fans as his work here feels rushed and bland. It’s almost like he lost interest or ran out of time halfway through, producing  a forgettable story and a poor introduction to the characters.

A much better use of your time is the first six issues of All Star Western (2011) written by Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray with artwork by Moritat. Bringing Jonah Hex to Gotham City in the late nineteenth century was a stroke of brilliance and making his sidekick Amadeus Arkham makes for some great odd couple dynamics as the two try to solve a series of murders similar to the Jack the Ripper killings. The art (reminiscent of the french master Moebius) is in turns sexy, and disturbing and never less than brilliant. The only bad thing I can say about these comics is that there are not enough of them. All Star Western ran longer than any of the other New 52 launch titles without traditional superhero leads and only the first trade’s worth of material is available to read online with a DC Universe subscription. Hopefully more will be uploaded soon as these are some of the best comics produced by a major company in recent years and the series only gets better from here.

Uncanny X-Men #1 Gets a Cover from Rob Liefeld

This November, Uncanny X-Men returns with a new ongoing series, bringing together nearly every mutant left on earth in a story that threatens to destroy them. It’s an epic tale of mystery and tragic disappearance, with an adventure so earth-shattering, it could very well be the X-Men’s FINAL mission!

Celebrating the much-anticipated launch of Uncanny X-Men #1, Marvel has revealed a new variant cover from legendary artist Rob Liefeld!

Uncanny X-Men #1 is written by Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson and Matthew Rosenberg, with art by Mahmud Asrar, Mark Bagley, and Mirko Colak, and a cover by Leinil Francis Yu. You can find it on shelves November 14, 2018.

Review: Bloodstrike #0

Indie darling and Copra cartoonist Michel Fiffe helms the latest incarnation of Extreme Studios’ Bloodstrike in a comic that tells the origin story of the Rob Liefeld created team of reanimated super soldiers: Cabbot, Fourplay, Deadlock, Shogun, and Tag with fan favorite Chapel showing up in a backup story. Fiffe’s filtering of the early Image aesthetic through a Fantagraphics, art comic filter is quite enjoyable, and Bloodstrike #0’s pages have the feel of a labor of love fanzine instead of corporate product. Unfortunately, Fiffe’s story is utterly incomprehensible for anyone who wasn’t already familiar with the characters in Bloodstrike, and it ends being more like fanservice through an auteur lens than a bold, new beginning for the property.

Probably, the most enjoyment I got out of Bloodstrike was the similarity of the characters to various X-Men; it’s like Liefeld, and by extension, Fiffe weren’t even trying to hide it with bad guy-turned-kind of good guy Deadlock sporting Wolverine’s cowl and having the code name Patient 10 to Cabbot, the lantern jawed gun and pouch sporting team leader and Cable wannabe. This is probably the joke, but the personalities of the members of Bloodstrike seem interchangeable and differently designed action figures going on missions around the world for the good of American imperialism. (The comic is set in the hey day of the first Bush’s presidency and ends around the Gulf War.) They’re reanimated corpses so there’s no possibility of permadeath. By extension, there’s no one to really latch onto, and the time skips and jumps and introduction of other Image characters give the book a stop and start feel like vignettes stitched together. Thanks to Wikipedia, I did understand the cliffhanger ending, and it reminded me of what Mark Millar tried to do with Wolverine in Ultimate X-Men in making him a Brotherhood member and not the Captain America of Canada. So, cool with a “k”, I guess.

It’s kind of funny, but the character that stood out to me in Bloodstrike #0 wasn’t even member of Bloodstrike, but of Rob Liefeld’s flagship squad: Youngblood.  (Thank you Wikipedia, again.) Her name is Vogue, and she made some hilarious quips about costume aesthetics in the heat of battle in a nice bit of commentary on the whole style over substance trend of mainstream comics in the early 1990s where art came before story. And it comes back full circle in Bloodstrike #0 where Michel Fiffe constructs balls to the wall, paramilitary action scenes with neck biting, diagonal panels, and a red “bleed out” effect on his background colors, but doesn’t give readers a reason to care about the characters. Honestly, this is a cast of characters and conceit that could use the minimalist action plotting of The Raid or Dredd, but with more of a team dynamic than the Frankenstein’s Monster of continuity and heavy artillery fire that was Bloodstrike #0.

Maybe, if you’re more knowledgeable about the Image Comics creations of Rob Liefeld and Extreme Studios in general, Michel Fiffe’s Bloodstrike #0 will tickle your nostalgia fancy and filter the excess of the 1990s in a stylish new way. This is definitely not new reader friendly, but it’s worth flipping through to check out Fiffe’s unique art and metamorphic color palette. From the backmatter and care that Fiffe takes at replicating the original costumes, Bloodstrike #0 seems like a passion project, but unfortunately that passion is hard to transfer through this story.

Story: Michel Fiffe Art: Michel Fiffe
Story: 3.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 4.8 Recommendation: Pass 

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Rob Lefield’s The Pouch Debuts on a Variant for Bloodstrike Brutalists

Image Comics has revealed a very special Rob Liefeld variant cover to the #23 issue of Liefeld’s highly anticipated Bloodstrike Brutalists arc featuring story and artwork by Michel Fiffe. This variant cover introduces an all-new character—The Pouch!

In Brutalists Part Two, bureaucratic overlords with morbid agendas need love, too. What lengths will they go to? A string of gruesome murders, a deadly disease, and a dark conspiracy; for Bloodstrike, that’s a Tuesday.

Bloodstrike #23 will hit stores on Wednesday, June 27th. The final order cutoff deadline for retailers is Monday, June 4th.

  • Bloodstrike #23 CVR A FIFFE – Diamond Code APR180494
  • Bloodstrike #23 CVR B LIEFELD – Diamond Code APR188129
  • Bloodstrike #23 CVR C FRAGA – Diamond Code APR188130

Rob Liefeld Shows Off His Killraven

In a comic that’s away in the vaults is a Killraven series from artist Rob Liefeld and writer Robert Kirkman from around 2009.

The series featured Killraven along with most of the future Avengers and accoring to Liefled, there’s 100 pages locked away awaiting to be seen.

Liefeld shared on Instagram his cover that he did along with Mike Capprotti.

Is it petition time to get Marvel to release this?

Venom 30th Anniversary Variants in March

In preparation for Venom’s 30th anniversary, get ready for 20 key moments showcasing the symbiote’s epic history. These anniversary covers will feature art by some of the industry’s top creators and rising stars, including Mark Bagley, Mike Perkins, Francesco Francavilla, Ron Lim, Inhyuk Lee and more!

  1. All-New Wolverine #33 by Dustin Weaver
  2. Amazing Spider-Man #798 by Terry and Rachel Dodson
  3. Avengers #687 by Jamal Campbell
  4. Black Panther #172 by Greg Horn
  5. Captain America #700 by Mark Bagley
  6. Daredevil #601 by Ramon Perez
  7. Doctor Strange #388 by Chris Stevens
  8. Infinity Countdown #2 by Ron Lim
  9. Invincible Iron Man #599 by Akcho
  10. Marvel Two-In-One #5 by Dave Johnson
  11. The Mighty Thor #706 by Mark Bagley
  12. New Mutants #2 by Bengal
  13. Old Man Logan #38 by Greg Smallwood
  14. Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man #303 by Rob Liefeld
  15. Thanos #18 by Mike Perkins
  16. Venom #164 by John Tyler Christopher
  17. Weapon H #2 by Mike Mayhew
  18. X-Men: Blue #25 by Francesco Francavilla
  19. X-Men: Gold #25 by Todd Nauck
  20. X-Men: Red #3 by Inhyuk Lee

The first wave of Venom Variant Covers will hit comic shops on March 7th. Don’t miss your chance to collect all 20 variants, coming to comic shops this February!

Netflix Gets Rob Liefeld’s Extreme Universe In a Seven Figure Deal

Deadline has reported that Netflix is getting another comic universe to play in. The entertainment company has cut a seven-figure deal for the rights to Rob Liefeld‘s Extreme Universe of comic characters. The project will get a writers room that will come up with a series of connected feature films that will be overseen by Avika Goldsman. This is on top of the deal Liefeld has with Paramount to develop a film based on Avengelyne as well as his creations for Marvel.

The Extreme Universe covers six comic series with over 50 characters such as Bloodstrike, Brigade, Cybrid, Re-Gex, Bloodwulf, and Kaboom.

An earlier deal with Graham King and Fundamental Films had been struck but that didn’t work out.

Liefeld said:

Netflix has become a part of every day existence for me and my children. Their programming is the most dynamic and diverse I have seen. I am beyond thrilled and inspired to be bringing my Extreme catalogue to life with the creative wizards at Netflix. What Akiva Goldsman has achieved with his craft and storytelling across all mediums in our industray is of absolute benefit for my Extreme characters. He is an absolute comic book fanatic and working with him on adapting Extreme Universe has been electric. His stellar work on Star Trek Discovery has wowed the fandom and trust me when I say that the Teen Titans show he is producing is going to blow fans away. I cannot wait to show the world what we have in store.

Netflix last year purchased Mark Millar’s Millarworld which is leading to new comic series as well as live action projects for the company.

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