Tag Archives: omar mirza

Review: Zindan #3

As a fan of high fantasy, there is nothing like these experts in fiction and the world they usually let the readers become part of. As the fine art of worldbuilding, is central to the believability of every story set in this genre. One of the most memorable and will be rejuvenated with a new take very soon, is the very much celebrated Lord Of The Rings. As that world is very much like ours in certain aspects as everything is not always as it seems.

The trilogy of films made by Peter Jackson, made the books more inclusive and even made the use of Olde English even more understandable to the common ear. One of my favorite parts of the movies, is when Aragorn ask the Army Of The Dead for help, as compared to their other allies, one can automatically see their alliances are only to themselves, but they help so that their debt is forgiven. Sometimes in life, you never know when you need help and from whom, and how it will show up. In the third issue of Zindan, our protagonists find themselves either walking into a haven or a wolf’s trap, only time will tell.

The brothers enter a part of the city only known as the Herat, a place neither Zain Or Timur has ever seen anyone affected with the affliction these women have. Meanwhile, the Mughals ponder on the information an informant has given them, even though it has given them Zindan, based on their information, Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb is starting to become skeptical nonetheless. Also, the last of the Ansaars, are headed to Zar Pahaarh, to inform the keepers of the book that Zindan has fallen and evil has been unleashed. By issue’s end, not everyone makes it to Zar Pahaarh.

Overall, it’s an action-packed entry in this ever expanding story. The story by Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin, is fun, relatable, and exciting. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, a fun issue that gives the reader more insight into how and who was responsible for the fall of Zindan.

Story: Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin
Art: Sajad Shah, Adelso Corona, Alonso Espinosa, and Jessica Jimerson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Zindan #2

The term “As Rome burned,” is used mostly to describe the fallout of a major event or a disaster. This is a test most people. When disaster strikes, how they will either step up or how they will inevitably fail. This internal struggle within all of us is what makes characters in dystopian stories so interesting and can draw massive audiences and fandoms. And example is The Walking Dead series which through television reached an audience greater than the fans the comic it is based on.

Take the character of Darryl from the show, who was an original creation. As it was revealed a few seasons back, he was just following his brother before the apocalypse. If the zombie apocalypse never happened, at some point, he may have done something heroic but unlikely. These events often put people in situations where they have to step up or perish. It doesn’t have to be an event like a zombie apocalypse for someone to show their potential. In the second issue of Zindan we find Timur and Zain at a crossroads as the rest of the Ansaars dead and they must figure out what to do next.

With the legendary Zindan in ruins, unspeakable evils have been released upon this world. Bandits threaten to grab whatever riches are left of the Ansaars. Zain and Timur find themselves faced with the decision to stay in the only home they’ve ever known, or to venture out into a world that had only betrayed them as children. Will Zain and Timur risk everything to go after “The Immortal” and his deadly allies, including Khan “The Man Eater” and Tara “The Temptress”?

Overall, the issue is another interesting chapter in this ever-evolving series which carries on the tropes of this genre but with a more realistic flare. The story by the creative team is intelligent, well developed, and makes you care about the characters. The art by the creative team, though with some different artists, continues to make this book, a joy to look at. Altogether, an excellent installment that gives fans a few more reasons to following this outstanding comic series.

Story: Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin
Art: Adelso Corona, JL Straw, Pasquale Qualano, Alonso Espinoza, Jessica Jimerson and Sajad Shah
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Zindan #1

When it comes to epic fantasies, it feels like most stories center on some medieval band of friends or acquaintances somewhere in Europe or some version of it. I remember when I read Lord Of The Rings for the first time. I was entranced by the characters, the world and the journey that these characters would go. It transported the reader to places that would only be in the deep recesses of JRR Tolkien’s brilliant mind, shaped by his experience as a soldier during World War I. Like most children of color, I was left wondering if there was somebody that looked like me in this magical world?

This question would be answered in the movies. I watched the films conflicted. I enjoyed the interpretation by Peter Jackson but was also disgusted that even the movies had no one that looked like me. Fast Forward to today and these issues is being addressed and challenged with major book companies signing more writers of color. In the first issue of Zindan, we catch up with Timur and Zain as they battle evil spreading across India.

As the Mughals overrun India, we are introduced to Wayl al-Ahtab , also known as the Immortal  and the leader of the escaped prisoners, as he no mere mortal as he cannot be killed by swords . Soon they lay waste to what is left of the royal army as he seeks revenge against those who have imprisoned him, the Ansaars. We also catch with Timur and Zain as they bury their father figure and mentor, Khalid, as they grieve over him, they also must come to terms with what has happened to India. By issue’s end, Timur and Zain find where Wayl al -Ahtab was held while he is headed towards Bamyan for his own reckoning.

Overall, it’s an exciting chapter in this comic series which shows that these stories is not part of a tradition but the genesis of this well-traveled tradition. The story by the creative team is thrilling and well-paced. The art by the creative team is alluring. Altogether, it’s an installment which drops you in the middle of the action and leaves the reader breathless.

Story: Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin
Art: Adelso Corona, Jessica Jimerson, Mike Krome, Sabine Rich, Alonso Espinoza, and Sajad Shah
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Zindan #0

As a cinephile, I am often drawn to both stories and personalities, and usually in that order, as no matter how good an actor is at their craft, if the story is not well written it’s a waste for the audience. The material must be good and the actors must understand the material and form their own connection to it. You can see the commitment made by certain actors by how convincing they are. One of the most underrated actors of our time, is James Marsters, who played Spike in Buffy The Vampire Slayer. His portrayal was spellbinding and it was not until years later, I found out that he was not even British, he’s from California. Shows how good of an actor I think he is.

Another such portrayal is Antonio Banderas’ portrayal of the titular character in Zorro. That reinvigorated character in many fans minds including mine. I grew up watching the cartoon and the Disney live action TV show. What made me appreciate his character is how he and his brother were a pair of orphans who became bandits but only he became more than that. I wished I could have seen more of the two brothers. Their dynamic was something special and could have been so much more. In epic saga Zindan we meet two brothers, much like the two brothers in the movie, except both became more than their beginnings.

We are taken to the time of the Ansaars, 1681, a dynasty that would rule India for almost four centuries, and would turn family against each other, until the dominant came to rule. We meet two brothers, Zain and Timur, who were both orphans, as the castle that they grew up in, burns down. As they find Khalid, the man who saved them form a life of bondage, dying in Timur’s arms, they realize war was coming their way. Through a series of flashbacks, we find an emissary from the House of Alamgir, who has demanded their kingdom give up all their resources or be crushed. Soon armies from Alamgir start attacking the castle, first by raining down arrows of fire all over the kingdom. Next, they attacked by barging through the first defense with elephants. As their armies started to crumble, Alamgir’s army of Mughals descend on the fortress in full force. By issue’ end, the Mughals have penetrated through the fortress’s entrances, as the legend of the castle’s many secrets prove to be true.

Overall, this “first issue” is a sweeping fantasy tale that is more than an adventure but an exploration of what one is capable when they are pushed to the brink. The story is immersive, action packed and well developed. The art is simply gorgeous. Altogether, a tale which leaves readers invested in these characters and this world.

Story: Omar Mirza and Khurram Methabdin
Art: Adelso Corona, Jessica Jimmerson, Sajad Shah, Alonso Espinoza and Sabine Rich
Story: 10 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.9 Recommendation: Buy

Review: The Incapable Trump #2

When it comes to healthcare, there has been few hotter issues where people don’t seem to understand the issue. The past few years have shown that people cannot tell that “Obamacare” and the Affordable Care Act, are the same thing. The quandary about our healthcare system is further complicated by the implications of socialism and villainization of those in power over that word, without the public understanding the facts and the full implications. The sanctimony and obfuscation of facts being carried out when it comes to why the dismantling of the ACA is better for the nation is reprehensible. These acts have lead to even more confusion and has become increasingly part of a bigger fabric of distrust against government officials and the system of government. The original vision of Ted Kennedy was to provide all Americans, healthcare that is affordable and now we have gone back to a system before Nixon, where HMOS put profit before care.

In the second issue of The Incapable Trump , the creators dive into this topic in both an educational and entertaining way.

We find the elected president shortly after his transformation back to his unhealthy human self, as he pauses to try and understand what has happened to him, he looks for medical attention, from his doctor. He employs spin control Sean Hannity, so that the media doesn’t get wind of what’s really going on with him, as he enters his office, Dr. Bornstein, famously lies to his face, and assures him that a vacation to Maralago is what he needs most. In a secret room, the GOP struggles with the what just happened with the President, realizing they are losing the faith of the citizens and the country. Soon, they hatch a plan where they can introduce bills that no one reads because the citizens and the media is engulfed with whatever public spectacle POTUS is doing now. The media, including the Daily Show with Trevor Noah, can’t help but tear through the mess he has already made, to which the POTUS only watches Fox News and reads redacted newspapers, to stories of his liking, which is not very much. This is where the GOP visits him, to convince him to create “TrumpCare”, which thrives on capitalism and makes healthcare not reasonable once more. As the both Houses go to vote, it doesn’t pass the Senate, which causes Trump’s health to spike, as Secret Service is unsure if he has health insurance but arrive at a hospital nonetheless. Shortly, after arriving, the Incapable part of POTUS takes over his body and destroys the hospital while insulting the medical staff. I don’t want to spoil the end but there’s some great digs in who saves the day.

Overall, an excellent second issue which both entertains and illuminates the reality of the current political climate. The story by Omar Mirza is funny, relevant, and entertaining. The at by the creative team is gorgeous despite the subject matter. Altogether, an excellent issue that proves Mirza and the creative team are ones to watch.

Story: Omar Mirza Art: Alex Genaro, Armando M. Zanker, Rajeev Ranajan, Henar Casal
Story: 9.7 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Review: The Incapable Trump #1

In a world where world leaders are thought of disdain or ridicule, it is sill amazing to me that someone can get both reactions. A perfect example is the current POTUS who is, to say the very least, a source of controversy and confusion. At the same time he has brought out people’s true nature. Many of the people who supported him before the election, still are supporters despite everything and seem to be even more dug in when it comes to that support. Never has one president been so controversial, so ridiculed, so hated, and has brought the office nothing but indignation from our allies.

As everyone around the world witnesses how much of a “dotard” he is, the fractures he has caused in the very fabric in what makes us united and part of America seems to be underplayed by many. No one living can think of a time where xenophobia, racism, ignorance, the “making up of facts,” and constant lying has even been on display from the highest office in the nation. This is where the arts play its part and reflect what is going in our country and how the rest of the world sees us. In the first issue of The Incapable Trump, part parody part superhero satire, we find a man out of his depth.

In the first few panels we find the POTUS laying with his toy blocks. He soon finds out there is trouble from his inauguration, as the number of attendees is not what he expected. As he struggles with the questions and the cameras, the pressure becomes too much for him, which pushes him to become the Incapable Trump, an ogre like version of himself and an even paler version of the Hulk. Transformed, he says even dumber things. Eventually he faces off against Bernie Sanders and the rest of the liberals, in a faceoff with an ending that’s rather creative and a nice play on events.

Overall, the comic is a great story that uses both parody and a love of superheroes in a supremely imaginative way. The story by Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin is funny, relevant, and action packed. The art by Twins Vega and Beeezzz Studio is gorgeous. It’s one of the better parody books to make it out into the world in a while.

Story: Omar Mirza and Khurram Mehtabdin
Art: TwinsVega and Beeezzz Studio

Story:10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy