Tag Archives: nolan woodard

Review: Champions Vol. 5 Weird War One

This volume of Champions winds down as the team regroups to figure out their next steps and head to Weirdworld!? Yes, it’s superheroics mixed with fantasy in this fun adventure.

Champions Vol. 5 Weird War One collects issues #22-27 and Annual #1 by Jim Zub, Nyla Innuksuk, Kevin Libranda, Francesco Manna, Sean Izaakse, Max Dunbar, Marcus To, Marcio Menyz, Erick Arciniega, Nolan Woodard, and Jordan Boyd.

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on February 19! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1

Spider-Man has take on cosmic threats, world ending schemes, and has one of the best rogues gallery of any Marvel character, but isn’t he the FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD Spider-Man?

Writer Tom Taylor, artist Juan Cabal, colorist Nolan Woodard, and letterer Travis Lanham, kick off a more grounded Spider-Man in Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #1

Get your copy in comic shops January 9th! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Planet Of The Apes Omnibus SC

Planet Of The Apes Omnibus SC

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer:  Daryl Gregory
Artists: Carlos Magno, Diego Barreto
Colorist: Juan Manuel Tumburús, Nolan Woodard, Darrin Moore
Letterer: Travis Lanham, Ed Dukeshire
Cover Artist: Carlos Magno
Price: $39.99

Ape and Human societies have reached a new golden age, but peace never lasts for long. Ripples of dissent are spreading in both the Ape and Human ranks and when a mysterious assassin guns down the beloved Lawgiver, tensions will reach a boiling point! Can one human solve the mystery of the Lawgiver’s murder before war engulfs all of society? Or is this the beginning of the end for Apes and Humans alike?

Set over 1,000 years before the  arrival of Colonel George Taylor, award winning novelist Daryl Gregory (Spoonbenders, Pandemonium) and critically acclaimed artists Carlos Magno and Diego Barreto present the story of the rise of the original Planet of the Apes!

Collects the sixteen-issue series, plus Planet Of The Apes Special #1, Planet Of The Apes Spectacular #1, Planet Of The Apes Giant #1, and Planet Of The Apes Annual #1

Review: X-Men: The Exterminated #1

In the aftermath of Extermination, the X-Men mourn for their fallen brother, Cable. But no one is taking it harder than his adopted daughter, Hope Summers. Will Hope be able to cope with the loss, or will she be led down a dark path that she won’t be able to return from? Only Jean Grey can save Hope from herself! Plus, celebrate the life of Nathan Summers with a story from his past by Chris Claremont!

Cable is dead, sort of, during the events of “Extermination” having been killed by his younger self. And, not surprising, “post event” (the last issue of Extermination hasn’t been released yet) we get an issue mourning the loss of the character. Broken into two stories, X-Men: The Exterminated is an ok follow up but lacks, something. Having read it, I walked away having just spent the 15 minutes of my time and instantly the comic was pretty forgettable. It’s not that it’s bad, it’s just not memorable in any way. There’s no revelation. There’s not even much emotion. It’s just a safe comic that feels like a box checked off more than anything.

The first story follows Hope and Jean Grey as they set off to close down Cables various hideouts. Hope of course has a mission of her own that’s very predictable. The two go back and forth about what Cable meant to Hope and the banter feels like it’s more about Hope’s absence from comics more than her time with Cable. There’s much left on the table such as Hope sort of being Jean Grey’s granddaughter in a way and where Hope has been. Jean shows little emotion in the mourning and Hope comes off a bit cold beyond the anger she shows at Bishop and Deadpool, two characters who have a lot of history with Cable as well. Out of it all, Deadpool is the one who delivers the most emotional bit laying his cards on the table in a way. Writers Zac Thompson and Lonnie Nadler seem to not shake the tree much in an way and the script is fairly predictable in its end. It’s a story that’s both emotionless and without much point beyond answering the question about what happened to all of Cable’s technology and weapons?

The art by Neil Edwards with color by David Ramos and lettering by Joe Sabino too is forgettable. Again, it’s not bad but much like the story itself nothing stands out. The settings are generic sci-fi. There’s a mention of Cable enjoying cyberpunk but what’s presented doesn’t feel much like that. The environments have the minimal detail at no point emphasizing how much there really is or at least how much could get out and do some damage.

The second story reflects on a bit after Cable, Nathan, is born where his parents head to Alaska for some relaxation. It rewrites some of the comic history but it’s interesting mostly for the return of classic X-Men scribe Chris Claremont. The story itself has its touching moments but again misses any real interest. What’s most fascinating is the perspective of the narrative of the story being told. Nothing said or shown is vital and it all feels like its been included because it deals with baby Cable and fits the first story’s theme of parents and their kids (on a couple of levels).

The art by Ramon Rosanas with color by Nolan Woodard and lettering by Joe Sabino is ok with a throwback quality to it all. The comic feels like it could have fit into the late 80s or early 90s as far as style and would have fit being a backup story then.

The comic as a whole is ok. It never feels like it really honors Cable and by the end you’re left with muttering “that’s it?”. Nothing is vital and again this feels more like a checking of the box than anything else. There isn’t some deep thought about who Cable is or his impact on X history, instead it’s a very surface level experience that lacks any real emotion or depth.

Story: Zac Thompson, Lonnie Nadler, Chris Claremont
Art: Neil Edwards, Ramon Rosanas
Color: Jay David Ramos, Nolan Woodard Lettering: Joe Sabino
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dead Man Logan #1

The writing has been on the wall for months, Old Man Logan is dying and he’s not getting better. But, before he goes, he’s trying to leave the world in a better place and make sure the future he caused doesn’t happen.

Dead Man Logan #1 is by Ed Brisson, Mike Henderson, Nolan Woodard, and Cory Petit.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 28! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Darth Vader Vol. 3 The Burning Seas

Are you a Star Wars fan? Do you enjoy good storytelling? Comics? Then Marvel‘s Darth Vader comics are for you! Volume 3 of the series, The Burning Seas features three stories covering issues #13-18 and Annual #2.

Darth Vader Vol. 3 The Burning Seas features Charles Soule, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Daniele Orlandini, David Curiel Java Tartaglia, Guru-eFX, Joe Caramagna, Elia Bonetti, Chuck Wendig, Leonard Kirk, Walden Wong, Scott Hanna, and Nolan Woodard.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Star Wars: Thrawn

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Star Wars: Thrawn based on the novel by Timothy Zahn.

Star Wars: Thrawn is written by Jody Houser, art by Luke Ross, color by Nolan Woodard, lettering by VC’s Clayton Cowles.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: X-23 #1

Cloned from a warrior, raised as a killer, Laura Kinney has gone through hell and come out the other side a hero. After a stint as the All-New Wolverine, she returns to her roots as X-23 to make sure no one ever has to go through the horrors she did. With her sister Gabby and their pet Jonathan in tow, X-23 forges her own destiny.

Writer Mariko Tamaki is an amazing talent. She’s released some modern classic graphic novels and luckily, the “big two” publishers took notice having her take the reigns of two of their properties where Tamaki delivered two impressive stories. Now, she’ll work her magic with Laura Kinney, aka X-23.

In X-23 #1, Tamaki has a focus, and that’s Laura’s history as a clone. In charting her future, we’ll explore her past. And Tamaki is doing that in an interesting way, by bring in the Cuckoo sisters, another set of clones. Within the mutant community, there’s also a lot of clones, something that’s been touched upon, but not really addressed front and center. This series seems to be doing that by exploring what one misses when they’re a clone. It starts with an unknown birthday and goes from there.

Though the comic begins with a fantastic action sequence, it’s the heart that Tamaki focuses on. Laura and Gabby interact and speak their thoughts so that you’re feeling for them. It’s as much about the depth of the characters as it is how far one can sink their claws. Action is one thing, but if you don’t care for the characters, it doesn’t work and Tamaki has proven she knows how to mix both in every issue.

Helping Tamaki is Juann Cabal‘s art with color from Nolan Woodard, and lettering from Cory Petit. The art is fantastic with a style that’s hard to describe. The opening feels like an action film in the use of panels. It feels like the opening from a movie. The characters have tons of personality and their body language delivers as much of their feelings and thinking as what they say. That’s especially true for Gabby who feels like she’s bouncing up and down in excitement on the page.

I’ve enjoyed X-23’s adventures over the years but she’s never been a character I’ve cared about. Tamaki in one issue has me beginning to care about her. There’s a focus on character as well as the action and together it creates a comic that’s a wonderful read and fantastic debut.

Story: Mariko Tamaki Art: Juann Cabal
Color: Nolan Woodard Letterer: VC’s Cory Petit
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: All-New Wolverine #34

All-New Wolverine #34

Story: Tom Taylor
Art: Ramon Rosanas
Recap Page: Leonard Kirk, Jesus Aburtov
Color: Nolan Woodard
Letterer: VC’s Cory Petit
Cover: David Lopez
Graphic Designers: Jay Bowen, Anthony Gambino
Editors: Mark Paniccia, Christina Harrington
Rated T+
In Shops: Apr 25, 2018
SRP: $3.99

OLD WOMAN LAURA Part 2
• Though most of the world’s problems have been solved in the future, that doesn’t mean there are no opportunities to SNIKT every now and then…
• …and now that Laura’s back in the suit, she’s finding those opportunities aplenty.
• Plus: GUEST STARS you’d never believe and exotic locales you never thought you’d visit!

Preview: Hunt for Wolverine #1

Hunt for Wolverine #1

Story: Charles Soule
Art: David Marquez, Paulo Siqueira
Color: Rachelle Rosenberg, Walden Wong, Ruth Redmond
Letterer: VC’s Joe Sabino
Cover Art: Steve McNiven, Jay Leisten, Laura Martin
Variant Covers: Marco Checcetto, Elizabeth Torque, Nolan Woodard, Adam Kubert, Dan Brown, Mike Deodato, Morry Hollowell
Editors: Jordan D. White, Mark Paniccia
Assistant Editors: Annalise Bissa, Christina Harringnton
Rated T+
In Shops: Apr 25, 2018
SRP: $5.99

The RETURN OF WOLVERINE begins here, providing the first piece of a mystery that will leave no corner of the Marvel Universe untouched. Just as the X-Men have finally come to terms with Logan’s death, they learn a terrible secret. Old wounds will be re-opened, truths questioned, and an epic quest begun. The earliest clues to the mystery of Wolverine’s return are laid down here… who will solve it first?

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