Tag Archives: nnedi okorafor

Marvel Celebrates Black History Month with Marvel’s Voices: Legacy #1 and Variant Covers by Ernanda Souza

Black Panther. Storm. Blade. Falcon. Ironheart. Luke Cage. Spectrum. And so many more. Marvel’s incredible legacy of Black heroes will be celebrated this February in Marvel’s Voices: Legacy #1.

This thrilling special will feature a dazzling array of stories by both new and established creators. Eisner Award-winning writer Nnedi Okorafor pens a Venom story highlighting the importance of heroes who fight for the downtrodden. Explore Blade’s legacy – vampiric and heroic – in a story by writer Danny Lore. And in their exciting Marvel Comics debuts, Ho Che Anderson brings Luke Cage fans an old-school story about the choices that make a hero, author Tochi Onyebuchi tells an action-packed tale of a wild night in Madripoor with Domino, and writer Stephanie Williams highlights family in a light-hearted Monica Rambeau story! See these outstanding writers and more take on their favorite heroes in tales designed to inspire and uplift, featuring art by Ken Lashley, Sean Damien Hill, Valentine de Landro, Chris Allen, and more!

The Marvel’s Voices program continues to showcase that the Marvel Universe truly is the “the world outside your window.” Don’t miss this latest installment honoring Black History Month when Marvel’s Voices: Legacy #1 hits stands in February!

Marvel Comics has also announced a series of Black History Month variant covers by renowned artist Ernanda Souza. Also making her Marvel Comics debut, Souza brings to life your favorite black heroes in stunning variant covers coming in February.

Check out rising star Taurin Clarke and Jesus Aburtov’s cover for Marvel’s Voices: Legacy #1 below along with the first three Black History Month variant covers featuring Storm, Blade, and Black Panther.

LaGuardia Wins the Hugo Award for “Best Graphic Story or Comic”

LaGuardia

The winners of the 2020 Hugo Awards have been announced. LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor with art by Tana Ford, colors by James Devlin, and published by Berger Books and Dark Horse won for “Best Graphic Story or Comic.”

The Awards were presented on August 1, 2020 at a ceremony at the 78th World Science Fiction Convention in New Zealand, which was entirely virtual due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Check out below for the full list of nominess and winners this year. Congrats to everyone.

Best Novel

  • A Memory Called Empire, by Arkady Martine (Tor; Tor UK)
  • The City in the Middle of the Night, by Charlie Jane Anders (Tor; Titan)
  • Gideon the Ninth, by Tamsyn Muir (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Light Brigade, by Kameron Hurley (Saga; Angry Robot UK)
  • Middlegame, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • The Ten Thousand Doors of January, by Alix E. Harrow (Redhook; Orbit UK)

Best Novella

  • This Is How You Lose the Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone (Saga Press; Jo Fletcher Books)
  • “Anxiety Is the Dizziness of Freedom”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador)
  • The Deep, by Rivers Solomon, with Daveed Diggs, William Hutson & Jonathan Snipes (Saga Press/Gallery)
  • The Haunting of Tram Car 015, by P. Djèlí Clark (Tor.com Publishing)
  • In an Absent Dream, by Seanan McGuire (Tor.com Publishing)
  • To Be Taught, If Fortunate, by Becky Chambers (Harper Voyager; Hodder & Stoughton)

Best Novelette

  • Emergency Skin, by N.K. Jemisin (Forward Collection (Amazon))
  • “The Archronology of Love”, by Caroline M. Yoachim (Lightspeed, April 2019)
  • “Away With the Wolves”, by Sarah Gailey (Uncanny Magazine: Disabled People Destroy Fantasy Special Issue, September/October 2019)
  • “The Blur in the Corner of Your Eye”, by Sarah Pinsker (Uncanny Magazine, July-August 2019)
  • “For He Can Creep”, by Siobhan Carroll (Tor.com, 10 July 2019)
  • “Omphalos”, by Ted Chiang (Exhalation (Borzoi/Alfred A. Knopf; Picador))

Best Short Story

  • As the Last I May Know”, by S.L. Huang (Tor.com, 23 October 2019)
  • “And Now His Lordship Is Laughing”, by Shiv Ramdas (Strange Horizons, 9 September 2019)
  • “Blood Is Another Word for Hunger”, by Rivers Solomon (Tor.com, 24 July 2019)
  • “A Catalog of Storms”, by Fran Wilde (Uncanny Magazine, January/February 2019)
  • “Do Not Look Back, My Lion”, by Alix E. Harrow (Beneath Ceaseless Skies, January 2019)
  • “Ten Excerpts from an Annotated Bibliography on the Cannibal Women of Ratnabar Island”, by Nibedita Sen (Nightmare Magazine, May 2019)

Best Series

  • The Expanse, by James S. A. Corey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • InCryptid, by Seanan McGuire (DAW)
  • Luna, by Ian McDonald (Tor; Gollancz)
  • Planetfall series, by Emma Newman (Ace; Gollancz)
  • Winternight Trilogy, by Katherine Arden (Del Rey; Del Rey UK)
  • The Wormwood Trilogy, by Tade Thompson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)

Best Related Work

  • “2019 John W. Campbell Award Acceptance Speech”, by Jeannette Ng
  • Becoming Superman: My Journey from Poverty to Hollywood, by J. Michael Straczynski (Harper Voyager US)
  • Joanna Russ, by Gwyneth Jones (University of Illinois Press (Modern Masters of Science Fiction))
  • The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick, by Mallory O’Meara (Hanover Square)
  • The Pleasant Profession of Robert A. Heinlein, by Farah Mendlesohn (Unbound)
  • Worlds of Ursula K. Le Guin, produced and directed by Arwen Curry

Best Graphic Story or Comic

  • LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor, art by Tana Ford, colours by James Devlin (Berger Books; Dark Horse)
  • Die, Volume 1: Fantasy Heartbreaker, by Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)
  • Monstress, Volume 4: The Chosen, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image)
  • Mooncakes, by Wendy Xu and Suzanne Walker, letters by Joamette Gil (Oni Press; Lion Forge)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 6, written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image)
  • The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 9: “Okay”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form

  • Good Omens, written by Neil Gaiman, directed by Douglas Mackinnon (Amazon Studios/BBC Studios/Narrativia/The Blank Corporation)
  • Avengers: Endgame, screenplay by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, directed by Anthony Russo and Joe Russo (Marvel Studios)
  • Captain Marvel, screenplay by Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck and Geneva Robertson-Dworet, directed by Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck (Walt Disney Pictures/Marvel Studios/Animal Logic (Australia))
  • Russian Doll (Season One), created by Natasha Lyonne, Leslye Headland and Amy Poehler, directed by Leslye Headland, Jamie Babbit and Natasha Lyonne (3 Arts Entertainment/Jax Media/Netflix/Paper Kite Productions/Universal Television)
  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, screenplay by Chris Terrio and J.J. Abrams, directed by J.J. Abrams (Walt Disney Pictures/Lucasfilm/Bad Robot)
  • Us, written and directed by Jordan Peele (Monkeypaw Productions/Universal Pictures)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

  • The Good Place: “The Answer”, written by Daniel Schofield, directed by Valeria Migliassi Collins (Fremulon/3 Arts Entertainment/Universal Television)
  • The Expanse: “Cibola Burn”, written by Daniel Abraham & Ty Franck and Naren Shankar, directed by Breck Eisner (Amazon Prime Video)
  • Watchmen: “A God Walks into Abar”, written by Jeff Jensen and Damon Lindelof, directed by Nicole Kassell (HBO)
  • The Mandalorian: “Redemption”, written by Jon Favreau, directed by Taika Waititi (Disney+)
  • Doctor Who: “Resolution”, written by Chris Chibnall, directed by Wayne Yip (BBC)
  • Watchmen: “This Extraordinary Being”, written by Damon Lindelof and Cord Jefferson, directed by Stephen Williams (HBO)

Best Editor, Short Form

  • Ellen Datlow
  • Neil Clarke
  • C.C. Finlay
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas
  • Sheila Williams

Best Editor, Long Form

  • Navah Wolfe
  • Sheila E. Gilbert
  • Brit Hvide
  • Diana M. Pho
  • Devi Pillai
  • Miriam Weinberg

Best Professional Artist

  • John Picacio
  • Tommy Arnold
  • Rovina Cai
  • Galen Dara
  • Yuko Shimizu
  • Alyssa Winans

Best Semiprozine

  • Uncanny Magazine, editors-in-chief Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas, nonfiction/managing editor Michi Trota, managing editor Chimedum Ohaegbu, podcast producers Erika Ensign and Steven Schapansky
  • Beneath Ceaseless Skies, editor Scott H. Andrews
  • Escape Pod, editors Mur Lafferty and S.B. Divya, assistant editor Benjamin C. Kinney, audio producers Adam Pracht and Summer Brooks, hosts Tina Connolly and Alasdair Stuart
  • Fireside Magazine, editor Julia Rios, managing editor Elsa Sjunneson, copyeditor Chelle Parker, social coordinator Meg Frank, publisher & art director Pablo Defendini, founding editor Brian White
  • FIYAH Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction, executive editor Troy L. Wiggins, editors Eboni Dunbar, Brent Lambert, L.D. Lewis, Danny Lore, Brandon O’Brien and Kaleb Russell
  • Strange Horizons, Vanessa Rose Phin, Catherine Krahe, AJ Odasso, Dan Hartland, Joyce Chng, Dante Luiz and the Strange Horizons staff

Best Fanzine

  • The Book Smugglers, editors Ana Grilo and Thea James
  • Galactic Journey, founder Gideon Marcus, editor Janice Marcus, senior writers Rosemary Benton, Lorelei Marcus and Victoria Silverwolf
  • Journey Planet, editors James Bacon, Christopher J Garcia, Alissa McKersie, Ann Gry, Chuck Serface, John Coxon and Steven H Silver
  • nerds of a feather, flock together, editors Adri Joy, Joe Sherry, Vance Kotrla, and The G
  • Quick Sip Reviews, editor Charles Payseur
  • The Rec Center, editors Elizabeth Minkel and Gavia Baker-Whitelaw

Best Fancast

  • Our Opinions Are Correct, presented by Annalee Newitz and Charlie Jane Anders
  • Be The Serpent, presented by Alexandra Rowland, Freya Marske and Jennifer Mace
  • Claire Rousseau’s YouTube channel, produced & presented by Claire Rousseau
  • The Coode Street Podcast, presented by Jonathan Strahan and Gary K. Wolfe
  • Galactic Suburbia, presented by Alisa Krasnostein, Alexandra Pierce and Tansy Rayner Roberts, producer Andrew Finch
  • The Skiffy and Fanty Show, presented by Jen Zink and Shaun Duke

Best Fan Writer

  • Bogi Takács
  • Cora Buhlert
  • James Davis Nicoll
  • Alasdair Stuart
  • Paul Weimer
  • Adam Whitehead

Best Fan Artist

  • Elise Matthesen
  • Iain Clark
  • Sara Felix
  • Grace P. Fong
  • Meg Frank
  • Ariela Housman

Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book

  • Catfishing on CatNet, by Naomi Kritzer (Tor Teen)
  • Deeplight, by Frances Hardinge (Macmillan)
  • Dragon Pearl, by Yoon Ha Lee (Disney/Hyperion)
  • Minor Mage, by T. Kingfisher (Argyll)
  • Riverland, by Fran Wilde (Amulet)
  • The Wicked King, by Holly Black (Little, Brown; Hot Key)

Astounding Award for the Best New Science Fiction Writer, sponsored by Dell Magazines

  • R.F. Kuang (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Sam Hawke (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Jenn Lyons (1st year of eligibility)
  • Nibedita Sen (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Tasha Suri (2nd year of eligibility)
  • Emily Tesh (1st year of eligibility)

1945 Retro Hugo Award Finalists

Best Novel

  • “Shadow Over Mars” (The Nemesis from Terra), by Leigh Brackett (Startling Stories, Fall 1944)
  • The Golden Fleece, by Robert Graves (Cassell)
  • Land of Terror, by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc.)
  • Sirius: A Fantasy of Love and Discord, by Olaf Stapledon (Secker & Warburg)
  • The Wind on the Moon, by Eric Linklater (Macmillan)
  • “The Winged Man”, by A.E. van Vogt and E. Mayne Hull (Astounding Science Fiction, May-June 1944)

Best Novella

  • “Killdozer!”, by Theodore Sturgeon (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)
  • “The Changeling”, by A.E. van Vogt (Astounding Science Fiction, April 1944)
  • “A God Named Kroo”, by Henry Kuttner (Thrilling Wonder Stories, Winter 1944)
  • “Intruders from the Stars”, by Ross Rocklynne (Amazing Stories, January 1944)
  • “The Jewel of Bas”, by Leigh Brackett (Planet Stories, Spring 1944)
  • “Trog”, by Murray Leinster (Astounding Science Fiction, June 1944)

Best Novelette

  • “City”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, May 1944)
  • “Arena”, by Fredric Brown (Astounding Science Fiction, June 1944)
  • “The Big and the Little” (“The Merchant Princes”), by Isaac Asimov (Astounding Science Fiction, August 1944)
  • “The Children’s Hour”, by Lawrence O’Donnell (C.L. Moore and Henry Kuttner) (Astounding Science Fiction, March 1944)
  • “No Woman Born”, by C.L. Moore (Astounding Science Fiction, December 1944)
  • “When the Bough Breaks”, by Lewis Padgett (C.L. Moore and Henry Kuttner) (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)

Best Short Story

  • “I, Rocket”, by Ray Bradbury (Amazing Stories, May 1944)
  • “And the Gods Laughed”, by Fredric Brown (Planet Stories, Spring 1944)
  • “Desertion”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, November 1944)
  • “Far Centaurus”, by A. E. van Vogt (Astounding Science Fiction, January 1944)
  •  “Huddling Place”, by Clifford D. Simak (Astounding Science Fiction, July 1944)
  • “The Wedge” (“The Traders”), by Isaac Asimov (Astounding Science Fiction, October 1944)

Best Series

  • The Cthulhu Mythos, by H. P. Lovecraft, August Derleth, and others
  • Captain Future, by Brett Sterling
  • Doc Savage, by Kenneth Robeson/Lester Dent
  • Jules de Grandin, by Seabury Quinn
  • Pellucidar, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • The Shadow, by Maxwell Grant (Walter B. Gibson)

Best Related Work

  • “The Science-Fiction Field”, by Leigh Brackett (Writer’s Digest, July 1944)
  • Fancyclopedia, by Jack Speer (Forrest J. Ackerman)
  • ’42 To ’44: A Contemporary Memoir Upon Human Behavior During the Crisis of the World Revolution, by H.G. Wells (Secker & Warburg)
  • Mr. Tompkins Explores the Atom, by George Gamow (Cambridge University Press)
  • Rockets: The Future of Travel Beyond the Stratosphere, by Willy Ley (Viking Press)
  • “The Works of H.P. Lovecraft: Suggestions for a Critical Appraisal”, by Fritz Leiber (The Acolyte, Fall 1944)

Best Graphic Story or Comic

  • Superman: “The Mysterious Mr. Mxyztplk”, by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (Detective Comics, Inc.)
  • Buck Rogers: “Hollow Planetoid”, by Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Donald Duck: “The Mad Chemist”, by Carl Barks (Dell Comics)
  • Flash Gordon: “Battle for Tropica”, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Flash Gordon: “Triumph in Tropica”, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • The Spirit: “For the Love of Clara Defoe”, by Manly Wade Wellman, Lou Fine and Don Komisarow (Register and Tribune Syndicate)

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form

  • The Canterville Ghost, screenplay by Edwin Harvey Blum from a story by Oscar Wilde, directed by Jules Dassin (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM))
  • The Curse of the Cat People, written by DeWitt Bodeen, directed by Gunther V. Fritsch and Robert Wise (RKO Radio Pictures)
  • Donovan’s Brain, adapted by Robert L. Richards from a story by Curt Siodmak, producer, director and editor William Spier (CBS Radio Network)
  • House of Frankenstein, screenplay by Edward T. Lowe, Jr. from a story by Curt Siodmak, directed by Erle C. Kenton (Universal Pictures)
  • The Invisible Man’s Revenge, written by Bertram Millhauser, directed by Ford Beebe (Universal Pictures)
  • It Happened Tomorrow, screenplay and adaptation by Dudley Nichols and René Clair, directed by René Clair (Arnold Pressburger Films)

Best Editor, Short Form

  • John W. Campbell, Jr.
  • Oscar J. Friend
  • Mary Gnaedinger
  • Dorothy McIlwraith
  • Raymond A. Palmer
  • W. Scott Peacock

Best Professional Artist

  • Margaret Brundage
  • Earle Bergey
  • Boris Dolgov
  • Matt Fox
  • Paul Orban
  • William Timmins

Best Fanzine

  • Voice of the Imagi-Nation, edited by Forrest J. Ackerman and Myrtle R. Douglas
  • The Acolyte, edited by Francis T. Laney and Samuel D. Russell
  • Diablerie, edited by Bill Watson
  • Futurian War Digest, edited by J. Michael Rosenblum
  • Shangri L’Affaires, edited by Charles Burbee
  • Le Zombie, edited by Bob Tucker and E.E. Evans

Best Fan Writer

  • Fritz Leiber
  • Morojo/Myrtle R. Douglas
  • J. Michael Rosenblum
  • Jack Speer
  • Bob Tucker
  • Harry Warner, Jr.

Check out the Hugo Award’s “Best Graphic Story or Comic” Nominees

Hugo Awards

The nominees for “Best Graphic Story or Comic” for this year’s Hugo Awards have been announced. Normally, the winners are announced at Worldcon but with the event this year canceled due to COVID-19, it’s unknown when the winners will be announced.

The nominees were announced on April 8 and were decided from 1,584 valid nominating ballots with a total of 27,033 nominations. Members nominated up to five works/people in each category, and the top six works/people in each category were shortlisted as finalists.

Check out all of the Hugo nominees and the comic nominees below:

  • Die, Volume 1: Fantasy Heartbreaker, by Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

  • LaGuardia, written by Nnedi Okorafor, art by Tana Ford, colors by James Devlin (Berger Books; Dark Horse)

Purchase: AmazonKindle – comiXologyTFAW

  • Monstress, Volume 4: The Chosen, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAW

  • Mooncakes, by Wendy Xu and Suzanne Walker, letters by Joamette Gil (Oni Press; Lion Forge)

Purchase: AmazonTFAW

  • Paper Girls, Volume 6, written by Brian K. Vaughan, drawn by Cliff Chiang, colors by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

  • The Wicked + The Divine, Volume 9: “Okay”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie, colors by Matt Wilson, letters by Clayton Cowles (Image)

Purchase: AmazonKindlecomiXologyTFAWZeus Comics

On top of the comics above, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel are nominated in “Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form,” and Watchmen: “A God Walks into Abar” and Watchmen: “This Extraordinary Being” are nominated in “Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form.”


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Preview: Shuri #10

Shuri #10

(W) Nnedi Okorafor (A) Rachael Stott (CA) Kirbi Fagan
Rated T
In Shops: Jul 24, 2019
SRP: $3.99

INTO THE DJALIA! The alien creature that followed Princess Shuri to Wakanda is inches from destroying the Great Mound – and taking Shuri’s friends with it! With her Ancient Future powers gone and Wakanda’s entire supply of Vibranium at risk, Princess Shuri must take a leap of faith – into the plane of Wakandan memory. But will Shuri restore the Djalia…or doom it?

Shuri #10

Preview: Shuri #9

Shuri #9

(W) Nnedi Okorafor (A) Rachael Stott (CA) Kirbi Fagan
Rated T
In Shops: Jun 19, 2019
SRP: $3.99

VIBRANIUM 24/7!

All of Wakandan history and culture is under threat as the Space Lubber that followed Shuri all the way from the depths of space back to Wakanda makes its move! To stop it, Shuri and her allies will have to go deep into the Vibranium mines – which doesn’t sit well with the claustrophobic Storm!

Shuri #9

Preview: Shuri #8

Shuri #8

(W) Nnedi Okorafor (A) Rachael Stott (CA) Kirbi Fagan
Rated T
In Shops: May 22, 2019
SRP: $3.99

SHURI TAKES UP THE BLACK PANTHER MANTLE ONCE AGAIN!

Nnedi Okorafor returns alongside rising star artist Rachael Stott with a brand-new arc! But this is a Black Panther you’ve never seen before – one who will change Wakanda forever. Something has stolen pieces of the Djalia, the plane of Wakandan memory, and it’s up to the Princess of Wakanda to save it. But for every piece of the Djalia lost, a piece of Shuri disappears as well. Will a new suit be enough to save herself and her nation?

Review: Shuri Vol. 1 The Search for the Black Panther

Shuri #1

Anyone who has seen the movie Black Panther can’t deny just how important and excellent the movie was. It was a watershed moment. It became the first time since Blade, that comic book fans got a serious film adaptation of a black superhero.  It was also the first time in Marvel Studios history, where it had a primarily black cast. The centerpiece of the story involved a black protagonist and black antagonist. Another important part of the movie is that it didn’t involve until after the end credits any of the other major characters from the MCU to tell its story.

The fact that the movie’s plot was so self-contained is part of what made the movie so good and so unique. One of the best parts of the movie, was the introduction of Shuri, T’Challa’s sister, Princess of Wakanda and possibly the smartest character in the Marvel Universe. As comic book fans know that the character has donned the Black Panther in Deadliest Of The Species, but has not been seen since that epic series. Thanks to the movie, comic book, and movie fans, get to witness her return in Shuri; The Search for Black Panther as she faces the crisis of holding Wakanda together without the Black Panther.

We catch-up with Shuri, as we find out how she beat back Thanos Black Order, as she gained knowledge from her ancestors during her trip to the Djala, a journey which has made her stronger and wiser. As T’Challa leaves for Wakanda’s first space mission, the sovereign duties fall to the Wakandan princess, a role she is not completely sure she can do. Unfortunately, T’Challa, goes missing and a clandestine council takes it upon themselves to ask Shuri to step up and become the Black Panther. A role she is reluctant to take up, as Storm comes to help her, she tries some alternative methods to find him, which leads her to astral project her conscience into Groot. T’Challa’s absence has also caught the attention of “Africa Forever” a collective that represents the communication between Wakanda and the rest of Africa, as an expanding black hole opens up in Timbuktu, which brings Tony Stark to Africa. By book’s end, Shuri has averted trouble, stopped a local villain and finally is ready to become the Black Panther.

Overall, an engaging reintroduction to the character, as this version offers readers a more comprehensive look at one of the Marvel Universe’s most interesting characters. The story by Nnedi Okorafor is enigmatic, complex, and compelling. The art by Leonardo Romero and Jordie Bellaire is alluring and vivid. Altogether, an exciting book which will gain this character, more fans.

Story: Nnedi Okorafor Art: Leonardo Romero and Jordie Bellaire
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Abbott, Black Panther, Monstress, On a Sunbeam, Paper Girls, and Saga Nominated for the 2019 Hugo Awards

Hugo Award

Today, the finalists for the 2019 Hugo Awards, Lodestar Award for Best Young Adult Book, and John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards were announced online today by Dublin 2019.

Below are the nominees for “Best Graphic Story” and you can get the full list of nominees here. Three Image Comics series were nominated while BOOM!, Marvel, and First Second all received one nomination.

Congrats to all those nominated!

  • Abbott, written by Saladin Ahmed, art by Sami Kivelä, colours by Jason Wordie, letters by Jim Campbell (BOOM! Studios)
  • Black Panther: Long Live the King, written by Nnedi Okorafor and Aaron Covington, art by André Lima Araújo, Mario Del Pennino and Tana Ford (Marvel)
  • Monstress, Volume 3: Haven, written by Marjorie Liu, art by Sana Takeda (Image Comics)
  • On a Sunbeam, by Tillie Walden (First Second)
  • Paper Girls, Volume 4, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Cliff Chiang, colours by Matt Wilson, letters by Jared K. Fletcher (Image Comics)
  • Saga, Volume 9, written by Brian K. Vaughan, art by Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Below are the finalists for the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards for “Best Graphic Story.”

  • Buck Rogers: Martians Invade Jupiter, by Philip Nowlan and Dick Calkins (National Newspaper Service)
  • Flash Gordon: Fiery Desert of Mongo, by Alex Raymond (King Features Syndicate)
  • Garth, by Steve Dowling (Daily Mirror)
  • Plastic Man #1: The Game of Death, by Jack Cole (Vital Publications)
  • Le Secret de la Licorne [The Secret of the Unicorn], by Hergé (Le Soir)
  • Wonder Woman #5: Battle for Womanhood, written by William Moulton Marsden, art by Harry G. Peter (DC Comics)

Preview: Shuri #5

Shuri #5

(W) Nnedi Okorafor (A) Leonardo Romero (CA) Sam Spratt
Rated T
In Shops: Feb 20, 2019
SRP: $3.99

THE TWO BADDEST GAUNTLET-WIELDERS IN THE MARVEL UNIVERSE UNITE!

An alien creature has invaded Wakanda! And with her powers strangely malfunctioning and her brother still missing, Shuri is in over her head. Time to call for backup. Enter: Iron Man! But can these two tech geniuses figure out how to de-power an energy-sucking alien before it destroys the entire continent? Don’t miss the end of the first arc – and a dramatic change for the princess of Wakanda!

Shuri #5

Marvel Offers a Free Digital Black Panther Bundle

Long Live the King! This February, Marvel is celebrating Wakanda Forever and the reign of King T’Challa by offering a FREE digital bundle of the following five Black Panther comics for a limited time. Relive some of the most iconic and thrilling Black Panther stories from Marvel’s most acclaimed creators, including Ta-Nehisi Coates, Nnedi Okorafor, Roxane Gay, Yona Harvey, Reginald Hudlin, John Romita Jr., and more!

SHURI #1 (2018)
BLACK PANTHER #1 (2018)
MARVEL’S BLACK PANTHER PRELUDE #1 (2017)
BLACK PANTHER #1 (2005)
BLACK PANTHER: WORLD OF WAKANDA #1 (2016)

Use redeem code FOREVER at www.marvel.com/redeem to get a FREE digital bundle of the above stories through 2/10, 11:59 EST! Celebrate Wakanda Forever all month long!

*FREE DIGITAL COMIC OFFER VALID 2/4/2019 12:01 AM EDT TO 2/10/2019 11:59 EDT.  REDEEM CODE AT WWW.MARVEL.COM/REDEEM.  MARVEL USER ACCOUNT AND INTERNET CONNECTION REQUIRED.  ACCESS FREE DIGITAL COMIC ON MARVEL COMICS APP OR MARVEL DIGITAL COMICS SHOP

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