Tag Archives: nina vakueva

League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Gets a Special Edition

Earlier this month, Marvel and Riot Games announced a collaboration to bring League of Legends stories to comics and graphic novels. This December, explore the world of Runeterra and access exclusive, never-before-seen content with League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Special Edition #1!

Following the origin story of one of the first League of Legends champions, League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Special Edition #1 will feature over 20 pages of extras, including artist layouts, inks, colors, character concepts, and a glossary to dive deeper into the action and learn more about the tribes of the Freljord: The Winter’s Claw, the Avarosan, and the Frostguard. League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Special Edition #1 will also be localized in 20 languages for fans around the world to experience Ashe’s story.

League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother #1 will be released on digital platforms on December 19, with League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Special Edition #1 on sale on the Marvel Comics App and Digital Comics Shop, Comixology, and Kindle devices. A graphic novel collecting League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother will be released later in May 2019.

Preorder League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother Special Edition #1 digitally starting December 5! It’s written by Odin Austin Shafer with art by Nina Vakueva, and lettering by Cardinal Rae.

Marvel and Riot Games Team Up to Publish League of Legends Graphic Novels!

Marvel Entertainment and Riot Games hae announced a collaboration that will bring League of Legends stories to comics and graphic novels!

Kicking off with League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother – an origin story of one of the first League of Legends champions – players and comic fans alike will explore the world of Runeterra and dive into stories about their favorite characters. League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother issues will be released monthly on digital platforms beginning December 19, followed by a graphic novel published by Marvel and Riot in May 2019.

Raised in the savage wilds of the north, Ashe is an Iceborn, a warrior gifted with a magical connection to her frozen homeland–and burdened by her mother’s fanatical expectations. When they set out on a dangerous quest for the truth behind an ancient myth, bonds are broken, secrets come to light, and Runeterra is forever changed. Will young Ashe become the leader her people need? Or is destiny merely an empty dream?

League of Legends: Ashe: Warmother will feature the comics debut of Riot Games writer Odin Austin Shafer, along with stunning artwork by The Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award-nominee Nina Vakueva and lettering by Cardinal Rae.

Review: Heavy Vinyl

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got Empire Records meets Fight Club!

Heavy Vinyl features the four issues by Carly Usdin, Nina Vakueva, Irene Flores, Rebecca Nalty, Kieran Quigley, Walter Baiamonte, and Jim Campbell.

Get your copy in comic shops and in book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

 

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2017

In 2017, I found it increasingly difficult to keep up with all the new comics releases because of personal stuff etc.. There was also the sheer hatred and bigotry of some comic book fans, who foamed at the mouth every time a character that wasn’t a straight white male starred in their own book or if female characters weren’t drawn in an early 90s Image male gaze-y way. Creators and companies weren’t exempt from this either from Howard Chaykin’s transphobia and Islamophobia in his low selling Image book Divided States of Hysteria to the revelation that new Marvel Editor-in-Chief C.B. Cebulski lied about writing comics under the Japanese pseudonym Akira Yoshida for years and suffered little to no consequences for it.

However, there was a lot to love about the comic books of 2017, and I found solace, entertainment, and inspiration in many books from (becoming) old favorites about godly pop stars and dark knights to intriguing new titles about all girl fight clubs and young people experimented on by the government.

 

  1. Batman #14-37 (DC)

In 2017, writer Tom King and a crack team of artists including David Finch, Clay Mann, Mitch Gerads, Mikel Janin, Joelle Jones, and Jordie Bellaire explored almost every nook and cranny of the Dark Knight’s world in their work on Batman. Sure, there were epic arcs featuring one on one battles with Bane, a yearlong gang war with the Joker and Riddler, and a little family reunion in the “Button” crossover. But what Batman resonate as a comic book was the standalone and two part stories from King and Gerads showing the sweetness of the relationship between Batman and Catwoman to the emotional tale of Kite Man (Hell yes). King has a real knack for telling O. Henry-esque stories of ideas that humanize iconic characters none more so than “Superfriends” where Batman and Superman go on a double date with Catwoman and Lois Lane. An artistic highlight of the book was Joelle Jones’ beautiful, savage, and a little bit sexy depiction of Batman and Catwoman fighting for their love against the most evil of exes.

  1. Josie and the Pussycats #4-9 (Archie)

Josie and the Pussycats is a gorgeous, funny book that ended much too soon although it is nice to see artist Audrey Mok working on the main Archie title. Writers Cameron DeOrdio and Marguerite Bennett craft the rare Archie book that looks at both romantic and platonic relationships from the POV of young adults, not teenagers. They, artist Mok, and colorist Kelly Fitzpatrick imbue the title with a Saturday Morning cartoon zaniness, including high speed boat and motorcycle chases, kidnappings, and jokes about the polar bears from The Golden Compass. Yes, DeOrdio and Bennett overload all kinds of pop culture references and allusions in Josie, but it adds to the book’s energetic feel along with Mok’s fantastic fashion designs and Fitzpatrick’s bold colors. Josie and the Pussycats has some real heart to it with characters having all kinds of intense conversations about love, friendship, and fame between the over-the-top setpieces.

  1. Heavenly Blues #1-4 (Scout)

Writer Ben Kahn and artist Bruno Hidalgo’s Heavenly Blues blends the cosmology and philosophical and theological themes of Vertigo classics like Sandman and Lucifer with a quick and dirty heist thriller as a band of criminals, including a Great Depression Era thief, a girl who was sentenced to burn during the Salem Witch Trials, and a bisexual cowboy team up to break into heaven and steal something you may have heard of. Witty writing from Kahn and rhythmic art from Hidalgo that flows from the building of the Great Pyramids to the Old West and even an angel lounging in sweatpants keeps the story on its toes with flashback to each thief’s past life create an emotional connection to them. This is the perfect comic for folks who like to think about the nature of evil or the possibility of an afterlife while also watching Oceans 11 or Logan Lucky with a whiskey on the rocks.

 

  1. Shade the Changing Girl #4-12 (DC/Young Animal)

The crown jewel of DC’s Young Animal imprint, Shade: The Changing Girl is a beautiful, meditative look at identity and humanity from the perspective of a bird alien Metan girl named Loma Shade, who has possessed the body of teenage girl bully. Cecil Castellucci, Marley Zarcone, and Kelly Fitzpatrick’s story really took off when Shade decides to hit the road first for Gotham and eventually to meet her idol, Honey Rich, the aging star of a 1950s sitcom that was popular all over the galaxy. Zarcone’s artwork is extremely fluid and complements Shade’s reaction to the influx of stimulus all around her that is humanity as she begins to understand concepts like nostalgia and of course the big ones: life and death. Shade the Changing Girl is more poem than sci-fi thriller/mindbender, and Castellucci’s poetic captions, Zarcone’s sincere facial expressions, and Fitzpatrick’s, well, groovy colors bypass the critical part of the brain and go straight for the emotional center. It is an empathetic study into how humans communicate and navigate this complex world from a visitor from an equally as complex society so hence conflict.

  1. Generation Gone #1-5 (Image)

Comics’ enfant terrible Ales Kot makes his triumphant return with Generation Gone, which is one of his most accessible works that still takes shots at the kyriarchy and patriarchy through the lens of the “superhero” origin story. Artist Andre Araujo and colorist Chris O’Halloran provide equal parts majestic, disgusting, and triumphant wide screen visuals throughout the series from bodies being stripped down to bone, muscles, and organs to flying in the sunset. The way that the three main kids Elena, Baldwin, and Nick is a little bit of techno-organic body horror like Scanners filtered through 2017. Kot avoids typical superhero team up tropes and has them constantly at each other’s throats that all really boils down to toxic masculinity, especially Nick, who is like Max Landis with a healing factor. Generation Gone is an epic and visceral story with all kinds of carnage and big explosions that is ably balanced by Ales Kot’s nuanced characterization. There’s some decent world building, but it takes a backseat to Elena, Baldwin, and Nick’s journey and squabbles along the way.

  1. The Wicked + the Divine #25-33, 455 AD, Christmas Special (Image)

In its fourth year (Or “Imperial Phase”) as a title, Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson’s The Wicked + the Divine became both more self-indulgent and introspective before the ending the year with more emotional destruction and much needed side dish of pure fanservice. The main focus is on the relationships of the Pantheon from Dionysus’ truly soulful friendship with Baphomet (They spend most of an issue talking in the dark, and it’s lovely.) to the intense connection between Persephone and Sakhmet and the older brother/little sister Baal and Minerva that takes a big turn for the disquieting. Even though McKelvie’s figures and fashion decisions are still flawless as usual, WicDiv uncovers every metaphorical wrinkle or mole on the Pantheon members by the time “Imperial Phase” ends in a truly soul crushing manner like the slow build in “In the Air Tonight” before the epic drums. And after it’s over, Gillen and a host of talented guest artists deliver a comic that is sexy, thoughtful, and filled to the brim of feels showing what the Pantheon were like when they were young and less dead. The Kris Anka and Jen Bartel Baal/Inanna short is most definitely the hottest thing I read in 2017.

 

  1. Kim and Kim: Love is A Battlefield #1-4 (Black Mask)

Shifting the focus from Kim Q to Kim D in this fantastic sequel to the Eisner nominated miniseries Kim and Kim, Mags Visaggio, Eva Cabrera, and Claudia Aguirre confidently tell the story of a woman trying to get over an ex that she really cared for, but wasn’t good for her. There are also mech suits, space battles, basses being used as a blunt instrument, and all kinds of space bounty hunter shenanigans. The rift and reunion between the Fighting Kim’s is super relatable as who hasn’t been disappointed in a friend for returning to the same, not cool ex over and over again. However, Visaggio gives the Kim’s great growth as friends and in their chosen career as bounty hunters by the time the miniseries wraps. On the visual front, Eva Cabrera can choreograph the hell out of a fight scene, and there is still plenty of pink from Claudia Aguirre. Kim and Kim: Love is a Battlefield is a smorgasbord of quips, fun sci-fi worldbuilding, and real friend talk and improves on its already pretty awesome predecessor.

 

  1. Mister Miracle #1-5 (DC)

Jack Kirby would have turned 100 in 2017, and there was arguably no better tribute to his imaginative work as an artist and writer than Tom King and Mitch Gerads’ Mister Miracle comic. I know I’m double dipping with King comics on the list, but he’s just that good. In his art, Gerads teaches the old dog of the nine panel grid some new tricks and uses it for everything from a tender love scene between Mister Miracle and Big Barda to him getting repeatedly beaten by his older brother Orion, who plays an antagonistic role in the series. The bar-like grid of the comic book he stars in is the one prison Mister Miracle can’t escape from. (Wow, that got meta.) Gerads uses a trippy, almost television fuzz effect to show Scott’s tattered psyche as he faces death with his escape artistry, goes to war against Apokolips, and is sentenced to execution. King’s gift of writing both the mundane and utterly cosmic comes in handy in Mister Miracle whose most memorable scenes are Scott and Barda cuddling and joking around, not the big battle scenes. Again, he and Mitch Gerads find the human and the epic, which is definitely something the King would be proud of. (Big Barda was patterned off his beloved wife Roz.)

  1. Giant Days #22-33, 2017 Special (BOOM!)

Although the facial expressions that Max Sarin and Liz Fleming draw are truly outrageous at times, Giant Days is a fairly naturally plotted comic with the friendships, relationships, and life statuses of Esther, Susan, and Daisy ebbing and flowing like normal university students. They begin the year as BFFs for life, but start to drift apart towards the end of the year as Susan and Daisy’s relationships with McGraw and Ingrid move onto the next level. Esther is kind of stuck in the lurch as her penchant for drama bombs starts to backfire. Giant Days nails the constantly evolving fluid thingamajig that is relationships as a young adult.  As an added bonus, we also get to see how the girls act and feel differently around their family versus friends as Susan’s way too big and complicated family makes quite the impression. And, of course, Giant Days is very funny, and John Allison, Max Sarin, and Liz Fleming mine the comedy out of everything from the deliciousness of home cooking, the grossness of nerd dorm food concoctions, and even a video game wedding. (Poor Dean.)

  1. Heavy Vinyl #1-4 (BOOM!)

Reading Carly Usdin, Nina Vakeuva, Irene Flores, and Rebecca Palty’s Heavy Vinyl is like the comic book equivalent of relaxing in a hot tub, but the hot tub is either cupcakes or adorable Corgi puppies. (Take your pick.) It’s about a teenage girl named Chris in 1998, who has just gotten her dream job at a record store and her first big crush on Maggie, her co-worker, who is drawn like a shoujo manga protagonist. But then she’s inducted into a top secret vigilante fight club and has to rescue the frontwoman of her favorite band. It’s high concept and slice of life just like Vakueva’s art is comedic, beautiful, and a little badass. Carly Usdin does a good job in just four issues of giving each member of the fight club their own distinct personalities and relationships while doubling down on the cuteness and awkwardness of Chris and Maggie’s budding romance. But what makes Heavy Vinyl  the best comic of 2017 is its belief in the power of women and music to change the world…

Review: Heavy Vinyl #4

HeavyVinyl4Cover“Have I ever really helped anybody but myself/To believe in the power of songs/To believe in the power of girls?”- Metric, “Dreams So Real”

Heavy Vinyl #4 (The comic formerly known as Hi-Fi Fight Club.) cements its legacy as one of the cutest, gayest, and riot grrl-est comics ever in this miniseries finale from writer Carly Usdin, artists Nina Vakueva and Irene Flores, and colorists Rebecca Nalty, Kieran Quigley, and Walter Baiamonte. The comic plays with the most delightful of tropes, including scrappy underdogs fighting shady corporate overlords, the adorable saying goodbye to family montage, and of course, the big damn kiss. Vakueva panel layouts are also very lively and slanted for maximum fierceness even if this comic isn’t a beat ’em up battle royale story. It rocks though.

Even though she has to wrap up the first Heavy Vinyl storyline as well as set up some threads for future stories, Usdin doesn’t skimp on character development, and Vakueva and Flores use visuals to give a glimpse into each member of the Vinyl Mayhem fight club’s personal life. Of course, the manager/team leader Irene has an adorable dog and girlfriend, and Kennedy enjoys hot chocolate with her boyfriend Logan, who has become the Chris Hemsworth to their Ghostbusters and a solid source of comic relief throughout the series. Of course, Maggie has two doting dads, who spoil her with pancakes and fresh squeezed orange juice, and Chris is just trying to keep things together as she freaks out every time her parents say “action” with some manga-influenced sweat lines.

HeavyVinyl4interior

My personal favorite intro was Dolores, who is Puerto Rican, and has a close relationship with her family to go with her computer knowledge and Goth aesthetic. Nalty uses plenty of shadows in her room and just a glimpse of sunshine to show that she’s a complex character and not just a sullen Goth. I also like how Vakueva lays out her room and uses body language to show that Dolores feels a little bit of tension in balancing work and school as well as going out of state. Even though the spotlight has mainly been on Chris and Maggie, Usdin has given her a mini arc throughout Heavy Vinyl, and she plays a big, take charge role in the final big reveal with her no-nonsense attitude and technical knowledge. However, she has a softer side too as is revealed in an epilogue that made this 90s geek kid smile.

Even if it’s extraneous to the missing rock star/mind control overarching plot of  Heavy Vinyl, the hella awkward and hella cute slow burn romance between Chris and Maggie is the book’s beating heart. And there’s plenty of pay off in Heavy Vinyl #4 beginning with the complete adorableness that is Maggie falling asleep on Chris’ shoulder during the bus ride to New York. Palty emphasizes the blue sky outside their window, which creates a hopeful vibe while Vakueva and Flores draw one of the happiest faces of all time as Chris looks out the window. They and Usdin channel these intense feelings throughout the second half of the comic culminating in the reddest blush ever when Maggie tells Chris that she obviously knows about her crush. In general, these Maggie/Chris scenes show off the tightrope of romance and humor that Heavy Vinyl ably walks.\

But Heavy Vinyl #4 isn’t all longing glances, sweet montages, and kick ass tunes. Carly Usdin, Nina Vakueva, and Irene Flores do a lot of world-building and other big picture things like making the plot of this miniseries just the tip of the iceberg for a conspiracy storyline that is similar to Josie and the Pussycats, but trades out the camp for indie rock earnestness.  Some of the lines about this plot development are super on-the-nose, but Usdin is a smart and has Chris say most of them like “Music is about expression.” Chris’ intense love for the band Stegosaur and hunger  for finding and learning about new music as part of developing her identity as a young woman is a big part of her character arc so the lines really work. Also, the first in-person appearance of Rosie Riot is quite breathtaking.

Heavy Vinyl #4 has it all:  deep character dives, well-developed romance, organic world building, and a passionate tone from Rebecca Nalty’s background colors to Nina Vakueva and Irene Flores’ design choices and fight formations to Carly Usdin taking time to show each main cast member with their family. Music is awesome, stories about that are by women are awesome, and Heavy Vinyl is one of the best comics of 2017.

Story: Carly Usdin Pencils: Nina Vakueva Inks: Irene Flores
Colors: Rebecca Nalty with Kieran Quigley and Walter Baiamonte
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.7 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Heavy Vinyl #4 (of 4)

Heavy Vinyl #4 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Carly Usdin
Artist: Nina Vakueva
Colorist: Rebecca Nalty
Letterer: Jim Campbell
Cover Artist: Nina Vakueva
Price: $3.99

After Chris discovers a secret code, the girls have a new lead and renewed determination to find Rosie Riot…but what if she doesn’t want to be found?

Preview: Hi-Fi Fight Club #3 (of 4)

Hi-Fi Fight Club #3 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Carly Usdin
Artist: Nina Vakueva
Cover Artist: Nina Vakueva
Price: $3.99

Now that Chris knows about Vinyl Mayhem’s dark, amazing secret, it’s time to get her in fighting shape to save Roary from certain musical DOOM!

Review: Hi-Fi Fight Club #2

Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 is a fantastic romantic comedy in girl gang vigilante wrapping paper from writer Carly Usdin, artists Nina Vakueva and Irene Flores, and colorist Rebecca Nalty. Chris, Maggie, Kennedy, Dolores, and could be in a band, but they decide to kick injustice’s ass in various ways like stopping an all girl band from being harassed or trying to find Rosie Riot, the missing lead singer from Chris’ favorite band, Stegosaur. Usdin’s script spends some time laying out the origin of the “fight club” and digging into the Rosie Riot mystery (Especially the final few pages). However, for the most part, Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 is pure character study with Chris dealing with finding her identity as a teenager, coming to terms with her feelings for her co-worker Maggie, and also being silly and adorable along the way.

On the visual front, Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 is the cool sound effects from letterer Jim Campbell and Vakueva montage layouts issues. The comic is cut like a stylish MTV promo from the late 90s, but Nalty mostly uses a soft, suburban palette with the occasional bright background burst like when the girls are sparring. This color choice keeps the comic firmly in slice of life territory although Vakueva and Flores’ action scenes pack a wallop and are easy to follow to boot. Some other interesting visual choices, include Vakueva channeling her inner humorist and making Chris pull some crazy faces any time she interacts or is noticed by Maggie with no angsty narration needed. In contrast, Maggie has the cute, beautiful composure of a character from a shonen manga and later shows she can kick ass just like a Sailor Scout.

Usdin, Vakueva, Flores, and Nalty swing for the fences emotionally in Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 without resorting overused tropes like love triangles and or pointless in-fighting. Sure, Dolores doesn’t want Unlike the softer edges for Maggie, Flores uses a strong, stern inking line for Dolores, and she and Vakueva draw her either working the bag or commenting on how A power packed supporting cast aside, Hi-Fi Fight Club continues to be Chris’ story, and her thoughts and reactions fill the panels and caption boxes. Especially with her induction to the fight club, Vinyl Mayhem has ushered her into a “cool” new world of music, crushes, and action, and it’s a lot to process so she struggles being useful in the search for Rosie Riot.

However, she does grow closer to Maggie, but wonders if Maggie has romantic feelings for her or is just being nice to the new girl. Reading the subtext in facial expressions, pauses, and sometimes dialogue in their interactions (Especially at the diner.) is honestly the most entertaining and riveting part of the comic. Usdin, Vakueva, and Flores nail the rush of young love, especially when Chris goes from not being hungry and sulking to her room to running off to the diner and stuffing her face for cheese fries. It reminds me of this weird tic that I had for a little while in high school when I wouldn’t eat full meals in case a “dating situation” popped up, and I could still be hungry. Yeah, that was pretty much, and Usdin isn’t afraid to write Chris as insecure, vulnerable, and yes, passionate about her music, job, the fight club, and Maggie. An anecdote that she shares with the group about Rosie Riot getting ice cream in her hometown to deal with anxiety shows that she looks up to this woman as a role model and that helping find her is way high on her list of priorities.

In its second installment, Hi-Fi Fight Club plays to its strength as Carly Usdin, Nina Vakueva, Irene Flores, and Rebecca Nalty make their focus on Chris and her potential romance with Maggie the centerpiece of her story to find identity through her music fandom and nascent vigilantism. And the art and colors continue to be a treat with fluid action scenes, riot grrl poses, and plenty of longing glances and general feels whenever Vakueva and Flores draw Chris looking at Maggie.

Story: Carly Usdin Pencils: Nina Vakueva Inks: Irene Flores Colors: Rebecca Nalty
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 (of 4)

Hi-Fi Fight Club #2 (of 4)

Publisher: BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Carly Usdin
Artist: Nina Vakueva
Cover Artists: Nina Vakueva
Price: $3.99

With Rory in danger and Chris finally in on the crew’s off-hour activities, they need a plan to get to her in time… and they find it in the most unexpected place!

Review: Hi-Fi Fight Club #1

Carly Usdin pens a cheeky and interesting tale of a group of teenage female employees working in a record store with Hi-Fi Fight Club. The premiere issue sets up a story that serves up some serious Empire Records vibes. On its surface the story seems to be leading up to a teen movie style love story romp in a record store but, by the end of the introductory issue you discover that there’s more to there’s way more to the story. Usdin’ writing is complemented by an almost all female art team, the only male on the crew is the letterer which lends to an interesting female gaze.

Nina Vakueva penciling brings Usdin’s characters to life, there is a uniformity in the facial features and body types of the female characters in the issue and while the lead characters are well designed they’re somewhat interchangeable. Irene Flores ink work is sharp and Rebecca Nalty serves up some pretty pastels and punk colors making the story pop. Nalty gets bonus points for not making the resident goth look like a cliche.

I was hella excited when I read about the premise and became even more excited when I discovered the comic had an 80% female team. I’m happy to report the issue is pretty darn solid and I’m hoping that the few issues that I had with the first issue will be fixed in future ones. The writing is pretty solid, the premise is interesting and the comic world could use all the strong , bad ass female characters that it can get. Hi Fi adds a teen and superpowerless twist to things which is refreshing, it’s like it D.E.B.S. and Empire Records had a baby. The team of teen crime fighters/avenging Angels that Usdin created, is headquartered in the basement of the record store where all the girls work, is headed by a female team leader.

There’s loads to love about this new series but, I also found a couple of flaws. All of the female characters introductions are reduced to micro sentence descriptors one characters description left me with a bad taste in my mouth. The character Maggie’s descriptions is “Literally, the cutest” . While the other characters are a bit cliched and one noted, this one reduced a female character to a physical descriptor as if there was nothing else noteworthy about her. I realize that in the context of the narrator being a teenage girl with a crush on Maggie there would be some notice of her looks but, I’m sad that it came in the form of reducing her down to her physical features. I was more than a little disenchanted that the creative team was comprised of mostly women. I was also a bit put off by the lack of facial ethnic differences which, meant that the only person of color a lead had white woman dipped in chocolate syndrome. I know that there is more than one way that a person of color can look but, to have her look identical to every other character in the series rubbed me the wrong way especially when the artist gave the character braids. I also, wasn’t a fan of the fact that all of the women had the same body type to go along with their “perfect” faces. I had hoped that the artists would have taken the opportunity to give the characters their own unique looks and styles to showcase the myriad of looks that a woman can have.

Overall, I like the premise and I can see this comic going places. I just hope that they try to showcase more shapes, colors and sizes in the art work and that the story focuses on making the characters people who are more complex than microsentence descriptors. I look forward to seeing where the ladies go as they delve into their first case together with their newest addition Chris. The comic world needs a secret teen girl vigilante fight club and I hope that this evolves into the greatness implied in the issues final pages.

Story: Carly Usdin Art: Nina Vakueva, Irene Flores, Rebecca Nalty
Story: 8.2 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.6 Recommendation: Read

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with a free copy for review

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