Tag Archives: michael keaton

Warner Bros. axes Batgirl, the film won’t be released

Leslie Grace Batgirl

Though it is nearly completed Batgirl won’t be getting a release. Warner Bros. has decided to shelve the film which will not see it making to theaters or even HBO Max.

The $90 million production starred Leslie Grace as Barbara Gordon aka Batgirl and directed by Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah. The film was launched in 2021 as a focus on original films for HBO Max. The new regime of Warner Bros. Discovery has decided to focus on theatrical releases and felt the film wasn’t up to snuff for it. The films they are looking for are on a “blockbuster scale” and it was felt Batgirl didn’t reach that level. The film’s budget was smaller as it was original meant for HBO Max but the budget increased due to COVID delays and protocols.

There are many conflicting takes coming out right now though. Some say this doesn’t fit into the new focus. Some others have stated test screenings were negative. Others think this is part of a general shuffle going on with DCU movies. Rumors have it that Ben Affleck’s Batman is getting a bigger role in The Flash and Aquaman 2.

The movie was rumored to be getting a theatrical release instead of going straight to HBO Max so it being pulled even from that is a bit puzzling but the new regime seems to want to move forward with big movies going forward. The fate of the troubled film The Flash seems to be up in the air as well. It was noticeably absent from San Diego Comic-Con.

Batgirl also featured J.K. Simmons as Commissioner Gordon, Michael Keaton as Batman, and Brendan Fraser as the villain Firefly.

Now… countdown until #ReleaseBatgirl or #FreeBatgirl begins and plans change yet again.

The Morbius Trailer Delivers Loads of Teasers

The official trailer for Morbius is here. Based on the Marvel character, the film is part of Sony Pictures‘ greater plan for its line of Spider-Man films.

The film delivers a lot of hints and teasers towards other films including “that thing that happened in San Francisco,” a reference to Venom, a quick view of Michael Keaton who plays the Vulture in Spider-Man: Homecoming, and pictures of Spider-Man in the background.

Morbius debuted in Amazing Spider-Man #101 in 1971 and was created by Roy Thomas and Gil Kane. The character has been both a hero and villain in the Marvel Universe.

Morbius stars Jared Leto as Dr. Michael Morbius, Matt Smith as Loxias Crown, Tyrese Gibson, Jared Harris, Adria Arjona, and Michael Keaton. It comes to theaters January 2022.

A Better Look at Sasha Calle as Supergirl

A few days ago, director Andy Muschietti teased Supergirl‘s costume for the upcoming film The Flash. Played by Sasha Calle, the character is one of the numerous appearances by other DC superheroes including Batman played by both Michael Keaton and Ben Affleck.

The film takes Ezra Miller‘s Flash across the multiverse. It’s unknown how Supergirl fits into the story.

Today, we have an even better look at the costume that Calle will wear. While the teaser hinted at it, the costume looks a bit like Lara Lane Kent wore in 2014/2015’s Injustice: Gods Among Us Year Three #7.

Lara Lane Kent is the imaginary daughter of Superman and Lois Lane from the “Injustice” timeline. In that world, Lois and Lara are murdered which sends Superman down a fascist nightmare path. In the series, a dream sequence showed Superman what his life, and hers, would have been like had she not died.

We know DC is going to be releasing an animated film based on the Injustice storyline, is this a hint there’s something bigger planned? Time to stock up on some comics before they rise in price!

The Flash is a Go!

Director Andy Muschietti posted the logo to The Flash as he said “THE FLASH Day 1” kicking off production.

Not only do we get some music but also an official title in The Flash. The film stars Ezra Miller who debuted in the role in 2017’s Justice League.

The Flash will be released in 2022 and stars Miller, Kiersey Clemons as Iris West, Ron Livingston as Henry Allen, Maribel Verdú as Nora Allen, plus Sasha Calle making her debut as Supergirl and both Ben Affleck and Michael Keaton as Batman. The screenplay is by Christina Hodson who also scripted Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn).

While we don’t know a ton about the film, we do know the multiverse will play heavily into it and the DC Multiverse will spin out of it. We already have a tease of this as Miller appeared as The Flash in the “Crisis on Infinite Earths” crossover event that happened on the DC television shows.

This Flash Concept Art Shows Off a New Costume and Keaton’s Batman

Released during DC Fandome, we get a look at some artwork that’s inspiring the upcoming Flash film.

During panels, it was revealed that Bruce Wayne will be developing a new costume for the character which we can see in this art. Also, Ezra Miller‘s Flash will take his name from Grant Gustin‘s CW version of the character after meeting each other during “Crisis on Infinite Earths.” It was also revealed there are more chances of crossovers between films and television series in the future.

Finally, if you look closely at the art, you can see the Batman pictured isn’t Ben Affleck’s take on the character but is Michael Keaton‘s Batman from the 1989 film.

Ben Affleck Returns as Batman in The Flash

Ezra Miller and Ben Affleck in Justice League

What’s better than one Batman? Two Batman! Ben Affleck will return as Batman in The Flash. The Ezra Miller starring film is set to be released in summer 2022 and it’ll involve him traveling to parallel dimensions, firmly establishing the DC multiverse in film and not just on television. It’s loosely based on the Flashpoint comic event. Affleck and Miller appeared together in those roles in Justice League.

Revealed earlier this year, Michael Keaton will be appearing as Batman as well. Keaton starred in the role in the 1989 Batman and the follow-up Batman Returns. Keaton will have a “substantial” part. Affleck was needed in the film as he helps re-establish that the Flash knows the hero and he acts as a starting point for the adventure.

The film is part of DC’s ongoing strategy to play into their “multiverse.” The concept allows the same character to star in different franchises, even with different actors, as they take place on different Earths.

The first step of the multiverse appeared in DC’s television lineup where originally some of the shows took place on different Earths. In the recent “Crisis on Infinite Earths,” the multiverse was further established into DC’s films and other shows as Batman ’66, Batman 1989, and Ezra Miller’s The Flash all appeared. The DC television universe has its own Flash played by Grant Gustin. It allows DC to say “everything is valid and its all happened.” They can also explore films like Joker and still have them be part of the DC film universe. There’s another Batman franchise in production from director Matt Reeves and starring Robert Pattison.

The move by DC and Warner Bros. is the right one as it makes it stand apart from Marvel’s cinematic universe. Where that’s a cohesive world that might have a multiverse, it forces a tighter narrative where films rely on each other. DC and Warner Bros. create a decentralized take where they can release standalone films and take risks.

(via Vanity Fair)

Michael Keaton is in Talks to Return to Batman. It “May Not Happen.”

Batman 1989

Deadline is reporting that Michael Keaton is in talks to return to the role of Batman which he appeared in two films, Batman in 1989 and Batman Returns. This is talks and often talks go nowhere, it’s not a done deal like so many clickbait sites are reporting. Even Deadline says “this deal may not happen.”

Keaton’s Batman would be a “Nick Fury-like role” starting in The Flash starring Ezra Miller. It would have him take on the role in other films like Batgirl. It also doesn’t impact Matt Reeve’s reboot The Batman which stars Robert Pattinson which may pick up the storyline from Batman Returns according to Deadline.

Andrés Muschietti is directing The Flash from a script by Birds of Prey writer Christina Hodson. Barbara Muschietti and Michael Disco are producing.

DC’s cinematic universe is taking a different approach than the Marvel one. Instead of one narrative, DC is taking an all approach. Every film, tv show, animated film, are all part of a multiverse. Each story can take place on another version of Earth and crossover when needed. Keaton’s Batman connected with the DC television world as it was shown in the recent event “Crisis on Infinite Earths.” Then, Miller’s Flash also appeared on the show making all of the entities connected. This approach allows DC more freedom to create standalone films, “hey they take place on a different Earth,” reboot franchises, or a larger vision as was originally attempted with Batman v Superman, Justice League, Aquaman, and Wonder Woman.

Around the Tubes

Ghost-Spider #1

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: Get a spooky roommate in Freaking Romance – Free comics!

Newsarama – Micheal Keaton’s Batman Suit Going Up For Auction – Does it still have Keaton’s smell? Who wants to go in on this?

Reviews

Newsarama – Absolute Carnage vs. Deadpool #1
Talking Comics –
Conan: Exodus #1
Newsarama –
Ghost-Spider #1

Movie Review: Dumbo

Dumbo

You’ve seen a housefly, you’ve seen a dragonfly, but have you ever seen a live-action remake flop? Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls of all ages (and shout out to all the gender non-binary/non-conforming people, too!), prepare yourselves for disappointment and to leave theaters scratching your heads wondering exactly what you just watched. It’s Tim Burton‘s remake of the Disney animated classic Dumbo!

The weakest part of this film is that it is trying to update and remake Dumbo, a beautiful but problematic animated film whose running time is a scant 64 minutes, and probably only 40 minutes or so once you remove all of the objectionable elements. And so Burton’s updated version here actually zooms through most of what we think of as the Dumbo story in the first hour of the film, leaving room for an additional story where our baby flying elephant goes to work for a big city circus led by Michael Keaton. Here he’s paired with a French acrobat Colette (Eva Green) and expected to make big bucks for the big circus, which transforms into a messy third act that seems to simultaneously indict capitalism and the circus as an institution as Dumbo’s human friends (of course led by two plucky children!) and a team of circus folk plot a rescue for Dumbo and his mother to set them free.

Blame screenwriter Ehren Kruger for this mess, as he is also responsible for the travesties of the worst of the Transformer movies (Revenge of the Fallen, Dark of the Moon, and Age of Extinction) Yes, the guy who gave us problematic racist sterotype robots was asked to reshape Dumbo and its problematic racist stereotype crows. PS- the film just skips over the crows.

But in skipping over some of the glaring imperfections, we’re also left with an incredibly hollow and predictable story. All of the parts of this film that are uniquely Dumbo were better done in the animated film. Pink Elephants on Parade gets a Circue de Soleil type reimagining with acrobats and giant bubble machines and pink lights put on for a cheering audience. But gone is the charm and menace of this being a hallucination brought on by a baby elephant getting drunk on champagne. Baby Mine is still sad and heartbreaking, but isn’t adding anything that the original didn’t already have.

Despite all those negatives, there are some nice spots in the film. The central idea of the precocious misfit kids (the girl wants to be a scientist like Marie Curie! How progressive!) and their bond with the misfit baby elephant is still charming. The actors’ performances are doing all they can with this lackluster script. Eva Green is as captivating as always, even if her part is woefully underwritten. And then into the third act saunters Alan Arkin as a rich investor and steals every moment he’s on screen.

Some of the best moments come from the on-screen chemistry between rival and then partner circus ringmasters Danny DeVito and Michael Keaton. They’re both a joy to watch, even if they occasionally take me out of the film reminding me this isn’t the first time I’ve seen them paired up against one another in a Tim Burton film.

And therin lies part of the crux of the problem with Dumbo. As I’ve said, the parts that are uniquely Dumbo are simply better done in the original animated film. And what’s left? Well, perhaps it would have been better as an original Tim Burton movie about a creepy circus and an attempt to free the animals from subjugation. It’s where the movie actually really shines and the only place where it feels like a Tim Burton film as we get into the cool art deco design of the (intentionally/subversively?) Disneyland-esque “Dreamland” park, and especially “Nightmare Island” where the “dangerous creatures” are kept.

Any resemblance to actual Disney theme parks, living or dead, are entirely coincidental.

There are even two long, lingering shots of Dreamland selling Dumbo plush toys, as though Burton is trying to send us a coded message that he knows this is all a pretense to sell merchandise. There are also a couple of waaaaaay inside jokes aimed at people with an intimate knowledge of the Disneyland parks of yesteryear. That’s where this movie shines, where it feels subversive and like Burton is poking fun at the cashgrab nature of his enterprise. I’m here for that Tim Burton for days. But then he intersperses it with cringeworthy moments like a cameo from Michael Buffer, and if you are familiar with his work. . . you know what’s coming. And it’s terrible.

No no. . . Dreamland isn’t at all like Disneyland. . .

And also, for god’s sake, don’t waste Danny Elfman‘s talents asking him to redo the 1941 score. It’s the most underwhelming waste of his talents since his Age of Ultron score, which he famously complained about being so limited because he was just asked to ape a temp track. It feels very much the same here.

And so, unfortunately, all I’m left with is a weird feeling that I wish I’d just watched Big Fish and the original Dumbo instead. Those are great movies: even despite Dumbo‘s problematic elements, it’s still a classic. This. . . this is just not.

I’ve been fine with most of the previous Disney live-action remakes. Each of them, up to now, at least brought something new or different to the party. Despite occasional flashes of brilliance, this does not. As so we’re left to ask, who exactly is this movie for? Fans aren’t going to get what they want, and this is by no means new or innovative or interesting enough to warrant your hard-earned money (reminder that taking a family of four to a full-price movie plus snacks can cost almost as much as a single Disneyland ticket). Stay home and pop in your copy of the original or Big Fish and enjoy yourself.

2.5 out of 5 stars

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