Tag Archives: matt wilson

Search for Hu banner ad

Review: Undiscovered Country #16

Undiscovered Country #16

Undiscovered Country has been a fascinating series taking us on a twisted tour of what makes up America. After exploring individual liberty and innovation, the series takes us to Zone Possibility where we get to examine the myths and entertainment that have spun from the country. Undiscovered Country #16 focuses on American music giving readers a condensed history. As the issue points out, there’s a hell of a history here, far too much to pack into one issue. So, we’re given the basics and shown that there’s far more creation there than any of us realize.

In search of the Anything Engine, the issue feels like it’s full of riddles and puzzles as everyone attempts to figure out what to do next. That’s everything from singing to dealing with the “One-Man Band”. Writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together an interesting issue with Undiscovered Country #16. There’s a bit less of a funhouse feel to the issue and instead it shifts to challenging the readers in some ways. Music is presented to sign that the reader can attempt to decipher along with the characters. There’s a nice tease as a drum beat is discussed and readers can guess as to its significance and what it is before the reveal. It’s an exploration of music in both reading and listening.

The visuals for the series continue to intrigue. Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi have fun with some of the music eras hinted at. A joke about disco is groan worthy but still funny. The One-Man Band is creative and creepy in its design and presentation. The duo continue to create and explore new worlds visually while keeping the series’ look coherent and consistent. Matt Wilson‘s colors continue to enhance everything as greens and pinks help create an unease about the issue. Crank!‘s lettering enhance the emotion and delivers some punch to scenes.

Undiscovered Country #16 is an interesting issue. It doesn’t quite challenge readers about America’s essence like previous issues. But, Undiscovered Country #16 does challenge readers to think about the nation’s contributions to music. It’s an issue that will hopefully spur more investigation much like the characters within must do.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Conan Makes his Last Stand this December in King Conan #1

Writer Jason Aaron, artist Mahmud Asrar, and color artist Matt Wilson will return to the saga of Conan the Barbarian this December in King Conan! The superstar creative team relaunched the tales of the Robert E. Howard hero in 2019 to critical acclaim and are back in this long awaited limited series that will take the story of Conan further than has ever been revealed in ANY media to date!

As Robert E. Howard posited, when King Conan grows restless on the throne, he sails west, toward land and adventure unknown. Now see the first step of King Conan’s fateful journey from Aquilonia, as an old and terrible danger threatens to end the saga of the Cimmerian once and for all!

Don’t dare miss the first issue of the adventure of a lifetime when King Conan #1 arrives on December 15th!

King Conan #1

Review: Undiscovered Country #15

Undiscovered Country #15

Welcome to “Zone Possibility” the latest part of a fractured United States. Undiscovered Country #15 lays out what the latest zone is about giving us the myth of America. “Zone Possibility” is an interesting one. So far, it’s populated with the stories that America is built upon. It’s a blend of “America f-yeah” full of characters who have taken on mythical proportions in the founding of our nation.

Undiscovered Country has always been an interesting series. While it has a surface level adventure, Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together a series the explores the various aspects that make up the nation. Those aspects are both good and bad. This latest “zone” looks to take that aspect and make it a literal manifestation. The nation is built upon stories and myths but underneath is something nefarious. There’s a clear exploration of the “American dream” and how that compares to the “American reality”. How far the two will take it will be interesting but so far, there’s no issue hinting at the criticism to come.

It’s hard to discuss the interesting twists but there’s a lot to ponder by the end of the issue. The direction feels pretty obvious but that doesn’t mean there’s not a lot to mine as far as ideas, exploration, and criticism. That extends to the exportation of America’s ideas and myths to the rest of the world. There’s some pretty deep reading possible with what’s presented in just this issue.

Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi deliver the art joined by Matt Wilson on color and Crank! on lettering. What’s been great about the series is that each zone explored so far has such personality but at the same time everything works together. What’s interesting with Undiscovered Country #15 is the design and what’s presented in itself tells such a story. These are interpretations of American myths and history and we see a slightly worn down and beaten version of each. It’s a subtle detail but one that fits quite well into the world and what Snyder and Soule presents.

Undiscovered Country #15 is a solid issue of the series. There’s a lot to debate and think about. Each chapter has been an interesting examination of a facet of America. Each has entertained with lots of action and excitement and at the same time also delivered multiple layers to ruminate on. This issue is no exception to that delivering a look at this new zone and one that’ll already have you examining what’s being debated.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.15 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Papergirls Gets a Compendium with New Cover Art

Image Comics has announced that the Eisner Award winning series Paper Girls by Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang with colors by Matt Wilson will be collected in its entirety into a trade paperback compendium. Paper Girls: The Complete Story will feature new cover art by Chiang and will hit shelves this Fall from Image Comics.

“Always Be My Maybe star and Baby Cobra comedian Ali Wong will join Amazon’s Paper Girls series, based on Brian K. Vaughan and Cliff Chiang’s graphic novel, from Amazon Studios, Legendary TV and Plan B. She will join series leads Sofia Rosinksy, Camryn Jones, Riley Lai Nelet and Fina Strazza. Stephany Folsom and Christopher C. Rogers will co-showrun. Vaughan, Chiang, Plan B, Christopher Cantwell and the showrunners will serve as executive producers for the series, which is set to film in Chicago this year.”

Paper Girls follows four twelve-year-old newspaper delivery girls from the year 1988 who uncover the most important story of all time. Suburban drama and otherworldly mysteries collide in this critically acclaimed series about nostalgia, first jobs, and the last days of childhood.

Paper Girls: The Complete Story trade paperback (ISBN: 978-1534319998, Diamond Code: AUG210107) will collect the complete series, issues #1-30, and be available on Wednesday, October 27 and in bookstores on Tuesday, November 2.

Paper Girls: The Complete Story

Every Issue of Radiant Black Sells Out and Heads Back to Print

Every issue so far of the new hit series Radiant Black by Kyle Higgins and Marcelo Costa has sold out at the distributor level, including Radiant Black #3. Image Comics will immediately rush all three issues back to print in order to keep up with the rapidly growing demand for the breakout series.

The third printings of Radiant Black #1 and #2 will feature new connecting cover art by Geraldo Borges and Marcelo Costa, while the Radiant Black #3 reprint will boast a new cover by Cian Tormey and Matt Wilson.

Radiant Black #3 is a departure in tone for the series and shines a spotlight on the main character’s struggle with the creative process and the many life distractions he must overcome to focus on making progress with his manuscript. 

Since its launch, Radiant Black has been compared to Higgins’ previous work revitalizing the Power Rangers brand with his thirty plus issue run on Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, including the smash hit Shattered Grid, for a contemporary superhero mentality similar to the iconic Invincible series by Robert Kirkman, Cory Walker, and Ryan Ottley. Kirkman himself calls Radiant Black, “the perfect superhero comic for anyone missing Invincible.”

Radiant Black #1-4 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, May 19:

  • Radiant Black #1, third printing cover A by Geraldo Borges and Marcelo Costa (Diamond Code MAR218473)
  • Radiant Black #1, third printing cover B, 1:10 copy incentive B&W (Diamond Code MAR218493)
  • Radiant Black #2, third printing cover A by Geraldo Borges and Marcelo Costa (Diamond Code MAR218474)
  • Radiant Black #2, third printing cover B, 1:10 copy incentive B&W (Diamond Code MAR218492)
  • Radiant Black #3, second printing cover by Cian Tormey and Matt Wilson (Diamond Code MAR218475)
  • Radiant Black #4 Cover A by Ferigato & Costa (MAR210216), Radiant Black #4 Cover B by Mason (MAR210217), and Radiant Black #4 Cover C 1:25 copy incentive by Doaly (MAR210218)

Kyle Higgins and Felipe Watanabe court divinity with Ordinary Gods

On the heels of sales beast Radiant Black, Kyle Higgins courts divinity in an upcoming collaboration with The Flash’s Felipe WatanabeOrdinary Gods. This centuries-spanning epic sci-fi/fantasy series is set to launch from Image Comics on July 7.

This monumental new series of mythic proportions will debut with an extra-length first issue. Each issue will also feature stunning, wraparound cover art from such artists as Dave Johnson, Nicola Scott, Declan Shalvey, Rod Reis, Tula Lotay, Dan Panosian, and series artist Watanabe, all with colors by the Eisner Award-winning Matt Wilson.

The Luminary. The Prodigy. The Brute. The Trickster. The Innovator. Five gods from a realm beyond our own, leaders in the “War of Immortals.” At least, they were—before they were trapped, sent to a planet made into a prison, forced into an endless cycle of human death and reincarnation.

Ordinary Gods follows 22-year-old Christopher. He’s got two loving parents and a 12-year-old sister. He works at a paint store. He’s in therapy. He’s one of the Five. Which means, in order to save everyone he cares about, Christopher will have to reconnect with his past lives and do the unthinkable: become a god again.

Ordinary Gods #1

Review: Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the adventurer’s time in Unity as the battle against Destiny Man rages and the sector surviving is in the balance. This second arc is an interesting one as it challenges some of the mission and really leaves readers pondering if Unity is the best that America has to offer.

Though it sucked the will and choice from individuals, Unity as a sector delivered peace through technology. There was no illness or poverty but there was also a technocratic hand that controlled everything. There was a calm and orderly aspect to it all but with it came a heavy and grizzly price. But, even with that we’re left wondering if it’s the best this new America has to offer.

And that’s part of the brilliance of what writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule have put together with Undiscovered Country. We’re presented with an exaggeration of the various aspects that make up the United States. Each has some good and each has some bad. In the end we’re likely going to find out none of them are ideal and ideal is the whole but that’s a ways to go. Instead, with each sector we’re shown the good and the bad and in ways left to decide for ourselves what we would do if we were on this journey. The characters are vessels by which the reader is asked questions.

The world has been masterfully crafted this way and each is clearly thought out as far as its underlying philosophy and what it brings to the table, both good and bad.

That world is help crafted by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. The duo continue to present amazing art. Each sector so far has been so different from each other but at the same time it still feels like it’s the same world. Along with color by Matt Wilson and lettering by Crank!, Undiscovered Country #12 does an amazing job of showing the corruption of the Destiny Man in Unity. The visuals play heavy into that as well as the Destiny Man’s dialogue. It all comes together to show how different he is from the “clean and orderly” Unity. The battle between forces really feels epic and ground shaking.

Undiscovered Country #12 wraps up the current arc while pointing us on our next adventure… which seems intriguing. The series continues to challenge readers to think about the ideals that make up America and shows what happens when things get unbalanced. It’s a reflection of our world and at times continues to mirror real events. It does what science fiction does best, act as a layered discussion of the world in which we live.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Review: Undiscovered Country #11

Undiscovered Country #11

Undiscovered Country has been a fascinating journey, one that feels like a spiral into madness. The journey into this new United States has been one that has been a reflection upon our real world while projecting the worst of what we are and could be. This current story arc has been a horror story in the making and Undiscovered Country #11 gives us the full picture of that horror.

Written by Scott Snyder and Charles Soule, Undiscovered Country #11 has our group of explorers still in “Unity”. They’re presented with the truth of the land and all of the negative it comes with. This, while dealing with the attacks from the Destiny Man. Beyond the reality that’s presented, what’s interesting is it presents the role of technology and innovation within US history. It’s an interesting perspective and one that focuses it a unique way. The basic idea is that the US’s technology innovation has allowed us to connect easier. By doing so it has allowed us to live a more isolated and individual life. We can travel long distances allowing us to live further apart. Communication allows us to connect from thousands of miles away.

Undiscovered Country #11 also drops the moment I’ve been expecting where paradise turns into a nightmare. It’s been clear Unity is too good to be true and now we get to see it in its true self. We also get a bit more of a tease about the journey itself and the choice our group of travelers will have to make.

The art of Undiscovered Country #11 stands out as Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi lift the veil of Unity’s true self. Gone are the white walls and clean city. In its place is something much darker and scarier. They’re joined by Matt Wilson on colors and Crank! on lettering. Together, the group has slowly driven the story narratively adding slight visual elements to tip us off as things progress.

Undiscovered Country #11 leaves us to question the nature of Unity and technological advances. Paradise was anything but. We’re also left to question the technology in our own lives. The series continues to be an interesting exploration of American ideals and America’s history giving us an exaggerated reflection of our real world.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.25 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: Undiscovered Country #10

Undiscovered Country #10

Unity is under attack by the Destiny Man as we learn more about this technologically advanced part of the new America. Undiscovered Country #10 is an interesting issue as it presents the action in the present while tying it into the revelations about the past.

Writer Scott Snyder and Charles Soule continue their impressive series exploring the different facets of modern America. The series is both a microscope and an exaggeration of our reality taking the good and bad to their extremes. Unity is a technological marvel using nano-technology to make everything a reality. But, it’s the underlying philosophy that’s an interesting one. Unity isn’t just named that, it’s something it believes in. One people working towards a goal. While the residents of it claim they act under their own free will, there’s a underlying horror and trepidation about it all.

In the previous arc, we saw what freedom and individualism run amok looks like. Unity is the opposite where the vision is one. It’s the embodiment that America is best when it works together. But, taken to an extreme it dives into questions of freedom and free will. The issue doesn’t deliver answers, instead, Undiscovered Country #10 throws out a lot of questions allowing the reader to debate it all themself.

The art by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Marcello Grassi is fantastic. There’s some imagery that’ll give you pause with designs that feel both familiar and unlike anything I’ve seen. With Matt Wilson’s mostly white palette and Crank!’s lettering, there’s something unsettling about it all. Through the tranquility there continues to be a logical coldness about it all. We get to see some of the animals that stalk in the oceans outside Unity, they’re a twist and a design that fits so well for the series and this particular area.

Undiscovered Country #10 is an interesting issue that begins to reveal the horrors that hide underneath Unity. Its philosophy is debated within without giving real answers. It does what the series does so well, shines a spotlight on an aspect of America and lets the reader decide what to think. But, Undiscovered Country #10 also keeps it entertaining and the reader on their toes. It’s a series that has yet to disappoint and when I finish an issue I have no idea what to expect next.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank!
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: Undiscovered Country #9

Undiscovered Country #9

The exploration of “Unity” continues in Undiscovered Country #9 which has the team learning more about the technological marvel. What’s been excellent of this story arc so far is that there’s clearly something ominous. There’s something not right about this territory and their promise clearly has a catch.

Writers Scott Snyder and Charles Soule continue their exploration of the United States, both literally and metaphorically. Each territory of this new United States is an aspect of what makes up America but exaggerated. This is an America run amok. Undiscovered Country #9 focuses on America’s success in innovation. The internet, the space race, so many things have either begun in the US or the US has improved upon it. But, with so much wonder there has also been terror. The nuclear bomb and so many weapons of destruction and death are perfect examples of the negative. As the characters ponder and discuss, Unity represents both the best and possibly worst of what makes the United States special.

Snyder and Soule continue to present the best of it. Unity’s technology allows anything to happen. Memories are stored and needs are met with just a thought. It’s the concept of nanobots taken to an extreme. But, for all the wonder and possibilities, the two creators also deliver some unease. We question everything we’re told. We, as readers, look for clues as to what doesn’t sit right. Like the adventurers, we the reader are skeptical as to what we’re presented. Snyder and Soule has set expectations and toyed with our trust.

Some of the fun is because of the art by Giuseppe Camuncoli and Leonardo Marcello Grassi. It’s hard to read Undiscovered Country #9 and not look for clues in the art. From the stark white setting that screams clean and disinfected, there’s a coldness about what’s presented. While it’s amazing to look at, the art team delivers a presentation that challenges us to look for clues as to what’s off. There may be nothing at all. But, we’re teased to do exactly that. Part of the dance is due to Matt Wilson‘s colors. While much of the issue is white and gray, there’s some other splashes of color drawing your eye to what’s focused on. The fact some of that is red leads to yet more of an ominous feeling towards those details. Crank!‘s lettering too delivers small clues and delivers slight punches to each scene and moment.

Undiscovered Country #9 continues to take us on an adventure much like Alice in Wonderland. We’re presented a wondrous world full of possibilities but underneath that wonder is horror. But, what’s most impressive is the series continues to hold a mirror to our reality. It may be a funhouse mirror but it’s still a twisted reflection of the world we live in. The series as a whole questions American exceptionalism and the building blocks of our nation. It challenges us to question what’s right and what’s wrong and to think about what happens if any extreme “wins”.

Story: Scott Snyder, Charles Soule Art: Giuseppe Camuncoli, Leonardo Marcello Grassi
Color: Matt Wilson Letterer: Crank! Editor: Will Dennis
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.35 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Almost American
« Older Entries