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Emilia Clark, Marguerite Bennet, and Leila Leiz Launch M.O.M.: Mothers of Madness in July

Multiple Emmy award-nominated actress Emilia Clarke will debut her first comic book series — the forthcoming M.O.M.: Mother of Madness—at Image Comics this July. This new, three-issue superhero series will be co-written by the GLAAD Media Award-nominated Marguerite Bennett with art by Leila Leiz.

In M.O.M.: Mother of Madness, the mayhem begins with Maya, under-the-weather scientist by day, over-the-top superhero by night, and badass single mom 24/7.

Deadpool action collides with Fleabag comedy when Maya activates her freakish superpowers to take on a secret sect of human traffickers. Each installment of the series will be an extra-length issue filled to the brim with comedy and chaos.

M.O.M.: Mother of Madness #1 will showcase a cover A by Jo Ratcliffe, a renowned artist whose work has been featured by a number of globally recognized brands and magazines including the likes of Vogue UK and Juxtapoz.

The Cover B for this first issue will be provided by Eisner award-winning Jen Bartel, whose clients have included such global brands as Netflix, MONDO, Adidas, LucasFilms, and more.

M.O.M.: Mother of Madness #1 by Ratcliffe (Diamond Code MAY210009) and M.O.M.: Mother of Madness #1 by Bartel (Diamond Code MAR218051) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, July 21.

M.O.M. Mother of Madness #1

The Justice League and RWBY Join Forces this April

Rooster Teeth and DC join forces once again, this time to combine the worlds of their popular anime/manga series with the World’s Greatest Super Heroes in RWBY/Justice League! RWBY/Justice League will be released in print as a monthly seven-issue series launching Tuesday, April 27. For fans wanting to jump into the story a few weeks before print issues arrive, four digital chapters of RWBY/Justice League debuted digitally this week, with new digital chapters publishing weekly on Tuesdays.

Written by Marguerite Bennett and featuring art by Aneke, Stephanie Pepper, and Emanuela Lupacchino, this seven-issue monthly miniseries brings Team RWBY face to face with DC’s paragons of justice!

RWBY/Justice League introduces fans of manga and superheroes to the Bruce Wayne, Clark Kent and Diana Prince of Remnant, fighting with Team RWBY. A new Grimm is running rampant across the island of Patch, and Ruby and Yang must team up with a young red and blue-clad farm boy to stop it! Meanwhile, Blake meets a mysterious woman who’s suddenly appeared on Menagerie, but her purpose for being there remains a secret. And why does she act like she hasn’t been around modern society?

Featuring stunning covers and character designs by Mirka Andolfo and a card stock variant cover by Simone Di Meo, this unique team up is sure to be a hit with fans of superheroes and manga alike!

RWBY/Justice League

Review: Superman: Red and Blue #1

Superman: Red and Blue #1

I’ll admit it, Superman isn’t the most exciting character to me. I find he’s one that runs hot or cold with little in-between. There’s been great stories and great runs but he’s generally not a character I get excited to read about. But, I love anthologies. So, getting to sit down with Superman: Red and Blue #1 to see what such varied creators would do had me intrigued. And, I was not disappointed. This is another homerun of an anthology for DC Comics, and one the delivers an emotional punch.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 features such varied talent as John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, and Marguerite Bennett on writing. Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, and Dani provide the art. Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan handle some of the colors, while Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, and Troy Peteri handle the lettering. I wanted to give the creators behind this their due because it’s a hell of an anthology. Every story is fantastic. The art is top-notch. The colors are used amazingly well, and the lettering is tight. This is a comic that knocks it out of the park.

But, what surprised me the most about Superman: Red and Blue #1 is how much it got to me. It’s stories made me think and delivered a bit of a punch. It’s impressive. Really impressive. DC has let their creators do what they do and it appears without fear. The stories range from lessons about childhood friendship, to condemnations of capitalism. There’s a story that tackles the failures of DC’s heroes (like Superman) from stopping the drug trade making them complicit in the deaths due to it. And, there’s a story of inspiration. Each story has highs and lows and are so unique with something to say about the character or what he represents. It’s an inspiring and thought-provoking comic.

Superman: Red and Blue #1 continues DC’s sparsely colored comics focused on red and blue like the title says. There’s also whites, blacks, and some gray thrown in but the various stories look beautiful and varied in their styles. There’s also a brilliant comic focused on colors themselves delivering a dive into what each represents.

The anthology is an inspiring endeavor and sets up such a high bar for what’s to follow. I went in knowing Superman: Red and Blue #1 was full of talent but how daring some of these stories are was not expected. To finish reading some of them a little choked up was

Story: John Ridley, Brandon Easton, Wes Craig, Dan Watters, Marguerite Bennett
Art: Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, Wes Craig, Jill Thompson, Dani
Color: Jordie Bellaire, Ron Chan
Letterer: Dave Sharpe, Clayton Cowles, Troy Peteri
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Preview: Superman: Red & Blue #1

Superman: Red & Blue #1

Written by: Marguerite Bennett, Dan Watters, Wes Craig, Brandon Easton, John Ridley
Art by: Jill Thompson, Wes Craig, Steve Lieber, Clayton Henry

This new series presents fresh new visions of the Man of Steel in his two signature colors of red and blue! Around the world, everyone knows that when they see a red and blue streak in the sky, it’s not a bird…it’s not a plane…it’s Superman.

To start things off, Academy Award-winning writer of Future State: The Next Batman John Ridley joins artist Clayton Henry (Batman/Superman) to tell a story of Clark Kent as he confronts a villain who still haunts him, in a story that shows what Superman can mean to a whole country. Then, Brandon Easton (DC Future State’s “Mister Miracle”) and Steve Lieber (Superman’s Pal Jimmy Olsen) take readers to the streets of Metropolis to show how one hero can mean so much to an individual in pain. Plus, writer/artist Wes Craig (Deadly Class) tells a tale of Superman’s early days and the man who inspired him to become the hero he is today! And Marguerite Bennett (Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman) and artist Jill Thompson give us a tale of teenage Clark Kent, while Dan Watters and Dani, the team behind Coffin Bound, bring us an outlandish fable about what happens when all colors are stolen!

Superman: Red & Blue #1

Preview: Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #2

Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #2

Written by: Marguerite Bennett
Art by: Marguerite Sauvage

The moon colony built around Superwoman’s Fortress of Solitude is under siege! Shape-shifting aliens have come to this place of peace in search of Lynari, a refugee from their homeworld. It’s a bad move on the part of these intergalactic bad guys: if Kara Zor-El offers you sanctuary, there’s no way she’s going to let anyone get their monstrous hands on you. Let’s just hope this gamble is worth it, because Lynari’s secret-the one that got her in trouble in the first place-could mean bad news for everybody!

Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #2

Review: Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1

Although she made an appearance in Future State: Superman of Metropolis’ lead story, Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1 checks in on the titular character’s new status quo. Kara is currently the pacifistic protector of Earth’s Moon where she protects outsiders and the disenfranchised, who have fled that violent planet for a new start. She is also estranged from the new Superman, Jonathan Kent, as well as the original one, Clark Kent. In this comic, writer Marguerite Bennett and artist Marguerite Sauvage show Kara mentoring Lynari, a metahuman with great abilities. They have speed, super-strength, shape-shifting, and power-draining powers that are displayed in a visually stunning way by Sauvage and are on the run from family members, who want the jewel that gives these abilities.

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1 has many good factors. First, it’s nice to see a hero, like Kara, dedicated to non-violence and using her abilities to help make life easier for the Moon colonist, or in a last resort, for self-defense. (Of course, this rule is broken on the final page when Lynari is nabbed by her evil relatives.) Also, non-binary superheroes are rare in mainstream comics, and it’s cool to see one get to have an arc unrelated to their gender identities and also do flat out cool things like use their shapeshifting to sprout multiple arms and move rocks to make a lake for water, recreation, and other fun stuff. Finally, Sauvage has a gorgeous art style that is rooted in Magical Girl manga/anime as much as traditional superheroes, and she uses beautiful full or double-page compositions to show Lynari training with Kara and building a relationship with her.

Marguerite Sauvage’s color palette also conveys strong emotion like deep reds and blues when Lynari is sad that they weren’t praised by the inhabitants of the Moon for setting up the lake. This leads to a tense conversation with Kara where Lynari says some hurtful things about Kara not being accepted by Earth or her blood family as vertical grids of a “fly and talk” erupt into a full page energy blast. Lynari has obviously been through some tough times in their life and needs a literal safe space as their relatives are on the prowl. Sauvage uses different layouts and palettes depending on the sequence going for rigid and pastels when Lynari and Kara are enjoying each other’s company and flying around the moon and going to the grid and darker shades when there’s any kind of tension. Add her detailed backgrounds with the people on the moon having very different reactions than Lynari and Kara and creativity with Lynari’s powers (The sihouette of a dragon and Kara flying is very charming.) , and this is a story that you could follow without reading the plethora of caption boxes and dialogue.

Future State: Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1

Because, yes, Kara Zor-El Superwoman is a comic that is a little bit overwritten despite Marguerite Bennett’s simple premise of Kara being in exile from Earth on the Moon and Lynari being a metahuman on the run. A lot of Bennett’s dialogue is didactic, and she includes one or two cliches about revenge, kindness, and helping others when showing Lynari helping out Kara around the Moon would get the point across. The monologue and text-heavy nature of the comic is evident from the first page when she eulogizes her deceased dog, Krypto. The fact that one of my favorite comic book canines had passed away already tugged at my heart strings, but Kara goes into great details about the moral lessons she learned from him. They are good, but basic ones like “Be kind”.

Bennett mixes these sayings with actual character-relevant captions dialogue for Kara in Kara Zor-El Superwoman as she discusses about how she was passed over for the mantle of Superman by a relative newcomer, (At least, in comics time.) and how she tries to honor the legacy of the House of El. This creates overt similarities and a natural bond between her and Lynari, who also has a destiny and long heritage that is explained in a page of exposition. Mentoring and diversifying heroes seems to be a throughline in Future State so far, either in the actual stories or in the way they’re marketed, and Kara Zor-El Superwoman #1 fits this mold, especially when Lynari and Kara are training together or having tough conversations about Kara’s non-violence with Lynari’s relatives on the way. (A shock of heat vision is the answer to that.)

When Marguerite Bennett is connecting the larger themes of Kara Zor-El Superwoman to specific incidents in characters’ lives or journeys, her writing sparkles and complements Marguerite Sauvage’s magical visuals that can occasionally be dark or playful depending on the tone of the story. However, when she’s in monologue about good deeds and virtues mode, the book loses steam and feels more like beautifully drawn and colored lecture and superhero comic. However, I love how Bennett and Sauvage craft the character of Lynari, and I hope they have staying power beyond Future State with their cool powers and emotional openness although their backstory is derivative of several characters already in the DC Universe like Amethyst of Gemworld.

Story: Marguerite Bennett Art: Marguerite Sauvage Letterer: Wes Abbott
Story: 6.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyAmazonZeus Comics

Bad Idea Has some Promotional Ideas

Bad Idea Crass Promotional Module v1

With their launch in March 2021 with ENIAC #1, Bad Idea is loading comic shops up with promotional material to get comic readers excited.

The Bad Idea Crass Promotional Module v1 gives a preview of the various series coming our way. It features 16 pages of preview content of titles including:

  • ENIAC #1 by writer Matt Kindt (Mind MGMT) & artist Doug Braithwaite (Justice)
  • TANKERS #1 by Robert Venditti (Justice League) & Juan Jose Ryp (Wolverine)
  • WHALESVILLE #1 by Matt Kindt (Mind MGMT) & Adam Pollina (X-Force)
  • THE LOT #1 by Marguerite Bennett (Animosity) & Renato Guedes (DCeased)
  • SLAY BELLS #1 by Zeb Wells (Hellions) & David Lafuente (Ultimate Spider-Man)

Plus: This bad boy also has A BUNCH OF SUPER-SECRET SURPRISES that you shouldn’t take pictures and tweet, SO DEFINITELY DON’T DO THAT!!!

Stores aren’t just a shop, they’re an art gallery — and it’s about damn time that someone treated it as such. That’s why Bad Idea is sending stores a museum-worthy framed poster. Yes, framed. And not just in one of those stylish, modern-thin black frames that looks good everywhere, but in a garish, lavishly adorned, 16×20 overly ornate gold frame that is impossible to miss. (Retailers: check your emailed instructions for the minimum required time it needs to be displayed, per “the rules.”) But don’t worry, Bad Idea will be sending a new 16×20 promo poster to pop in there every month, and they’ll be rounding out the minimum display time with one hell of a poster surprise, too!

This display stands approximately 16 inches high and handles two (count ’em!) rows of up to 25 comics apiece. That’s double-sided header cards promoting Bad Idea’s upcoming March 3, 2021 launch date and ENIAC #1, too, for once you’ve got those puppies in hand. In the meantime, you can pop your Bad Idea promo books in there or whatever in there once those run out. BUT REMEMBER: This lives on your counter. It is now an immovable part of your counter. These are the sacred rules of Bad Idea, and they are inflexible and unchanging.

Preview: Future State: Kara Zore-El, Superwoman #1

Future State: Kara Zore-El, Superwoman #1

Written by: Marguerite Bennett
Art by: Marguerite Sauvage

Kara Zor-El, Superman’s hot-tempered cousin, has finally found peace and purpose away from Earth and its heroes. Now known as Superwoman, she watches over the Moon and the refugees from across the galaxy who have congregated there. But all of that is about to change when a spaceship piloted by a runaway alien crash-lands and turns Kara’s world upside down! Does this fugitive come in peace? Or does this arrival bring war to our hero’s front door?

Future State: Kara Zore-El, Superwoman #1

Get a look into the Future with Kara Zor-El in Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #1

Kara Zor-El, the hot-tempered cousin of Superman, has finally found peace and purpose away from Earth and its heroes. Now known as Superwoman, she watches over the Moon and the refugees from across the galaxy who have congregated there.

But all of that is about to change when a spaceship piloted by a runaway alien crash lands and turns Kara’s world upside down!

Does this fugitive come in peace, or does this arrival bring war to Kara’s front door? Find out on Tuesday, January 12!

Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #1 is written by Marguerite Bennett with art by Marguerite Sauvage, a man cover by Paulina Ganucheau, and a variant by Alex Garner.

Future State: Kara Zor-El, Superwoman #1

Superman Takes Off in 2021 with a New Anthology, Superman: Red & Blue

In the spirit of DC’s iconic Eisner Award-winning Batman: Black & White anthology series, DC has announced Superman: Red & Blue, a new six-issue DC comic book mini-series presenting fresh new visions of the Man of Steel, featuring an incredible slate of comics’ most exciting and innovative storytellers creating comics pared back to Superman’s two signature colors of red and blue (magenta and cyan for the color nerds)!

Around the world, everyone knows that when they see a red and blue streak in the sky, it’s not a bird…it’s not a plane…it’s Superman!

To start things off in March’s Superman: Red & Blue #1, Academy Award-winning writer of DC Future State: The Next Batman John Ridley joins artist Clayton Henry to tell a story of Clark Kent as he confronts a villain who still haunts him, in a story that shows what Superman can mean to a whole country. Then, Brandon Easton and Steve Lieber take readers to the streets of Metropolis to show how one hero can mean so much to an individual in pain.

Plus, writer/artist Wes Craig tells a tale of Superman’s early days and the man who inspired him to become the hero he is today! And Marguerite Bennett and artist Jill Thompson give us a tale of teenage Clark Kent, while Dan Watters and Dani, the team behind Coffin Bound, bring an outlandish fable about what happens when all colors are stolen!

Superman: Red & Blue #1 (of 6), featuring 40 pages of stories by Marguerite Bennett, Wes Craig, Dani, Brandon Easton, Clayton Henry, Steve Lieber, John Ridley, Jill Thompson and Dan Watters, retails at $5.99 with a cover by Gary Frank and variant covers by Lee Bermejo and Yoshitaka AmanoSuperman: Red & Blue will ship monthly beginning on March 9 in DC’s Prestige Format binding.

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