Tag Archives: lucifer

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are you excited for? Let us know in the comments! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

Sequart Organization – “We Go Bigger”: Diving into Jonathan Hickman’s Avengers – This was a really interesting run.

Kotaku – Spider-Man’s Heist DLC Is Fun But Familiar – Who’s playing? What do you think of the new DLC?

UploadVR – Neon Wasteland Is A Gory Animated AR Comic Book – This could be very cool.

 

Reviews

Talking Comics – Black Hammer: Age of Doom #6

Comic Attack – Lucifer #1

Review: Lucifer #1

The prestigious comic imprint Vertigo is back and with it a whole new line of comics revolving around the universe of The Sandman. Lucifer #1 is the latest entry into that line of comics. Is it good for new readers? Is it worth picking up? Find out!

Lucifer #1 is by Dan Watters, Max Fiumara, Sebastian Fiumara, Dave McCaig, and Steve Wands.

Get your copy in comic shops today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
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Preview: Lucifer #1

Lucifer #1

(W) Dan Waters (A) Max Fiumara, Sebastian Fiumara (CA) Goni Montes
In Shops: Oct 17, 2018
SRP: $3.99

Lucifer is missing. Having embarked on a dangerous journey to find the mother of his abandoned son, the Prince of Lies finds himself imprisoned and crippled by mysterious forces who seek to torment him for their own terrible ends. Meanwhile: a car is crashed, two witches blind themselves, a tumor speaks its first words, and a perfectly good bowl of oatmeal is left to go cold.

Review: The Sandman Universe #1

With a flourish of alliterative narration from Lucien the Librarian, the return to the Dreaming commences in The Sandman Universe #1, a one-shot with a story credit to original Sandman creator Neil Gaiman that sets up four separate books set in this universe. Each creative team gets an opportunity to set up their stories in this comic. Gaiman, Si Spurrier, and Bilquis Evely use the fluid and ever changing nature of The Dreaming to visit the settings of the other Sandman Universe titles in a more urban fantasy and mythology driven version of all those intriguing fake trailers shown in Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez’s Grindhouse double feature. However, The Sandman Universe #1 also has an overarching narrative and final page cliffhanger and isn’t just a sampler platter.

There is Spurrier and  Evely’s The Dreaming that focuses on supporting characters of The Sandman and their hunt for Daniel, the Dream of the Endless as his realm cracks and shatters. It also acts as the framing story of Sandman Universe with Matthew the Raven traveling between physical, spiritual, and dream dimensions in his quest to find Daniel. There is also Kat Howard and Tom Fowler’s reimagining of Books of Magic featuring the boy wizard Tim Hunter and his mysterious teacher Rose, Nalo Hopkinson and Domo Stanton’s House of Whispers that introduces the New Orleans Voodoo religion to The Dreaming and has a young African-American lesbian couple as protagonists, and finally, Dan Watters, Max Fiumara, and Sebastian Fiumara‘s tortuous and twisting take on Lucifer, who must suffer to find his son and not be a absentee father like Yahweh. The framing story and three interludes have a strong narrative continuity thanks to the consistent, yet versatile colors of Mat Lopes and Simon Bowland’s Eisner-worthy letters as he takes over for the legendary Todd Klein.

Spurrier and Evely’s story that is set in The Dreaming has big ideas, humor, tragedy, and even horror as they reintroduce familiar denizens like Lucien the Librarian and Cain and Abel and introduce a new character in Dora, a female monster who can jump between dreams. Her agility is evident when Evely draws her multiple times in one panel, and Spurrier makes her a fast talker. She also has a dark side and isn’t a fan of the realm of the Dreaming because Morpheus lied to her a long time ago. The heavily inked flashback is some of Evely’s best work, gave me chills, and is the only time any members of the Endless speak in Sandman Universe. Like telling the story of a dream to a friend after the night you’ve had it, The Dreaming is all about setting chaos to order, but this seems like a tall order even though the epic quest format is pretty conventional.

After being unable to jump into the waking world via the food-laden dream of a woman with esophageal cancer, Matthew enters it via the dreams of Tim Hunter. While Bilquis Evely’s work is well-rendered and exquisite like a novel that is a masterpiece of both craft and plot, Tom Fowler’s work is messier, yet still highly detailed. Warts and all, t’s perfect for the story of an adolescent wizard, who suffers the second worst nightmare of any teen on the first day of high school. Kat Howard’s plot for this short glimpse into Hunter’s world is more Agatha Christie than JK Rowling, and it looks like Hunter will have to fend for himself for the most part even though she does give him a friend in Ellie.

Following Books of Magic, Matthew jumps into New Orleans and into a queer love story between Latoya and Maggie. However, Nalo Hopkinson and Domo Stanton immediately throw them into world of conflict between gods and goddesses, boundaries between worlds, and magical items. The Louisiana Voodoo goddess Erzulie is introduced in this story and is quite the mystery. Hopkinson and Stanton craft a true urban fantasy story as the life of a family and two young lovers intersects with forces beyond their control. There’s a lushness and beauty to Stanton’s art, and he and colorist Mat Lopes create a wonderful effect that turns the bayou into a scrying mirror.

The last story that Matthew wanders into before reaching the “end” of his quest for Daniel is Lucifer’s, and it’s told in horror tinged, nine panel grid severity by Dan Watters, Max Fiumara, and Sebastian Fiumara. The Fiumaras strip away the David Bowie Lucifer that left his kingdom to open a club in L.A. and play piano and strip him down to something more malevolent with images that evoke more contempt than sympathy for the devils like starving ravens. Lucifer is on a journey again, but it’s not a fun field trip and more of a bloody vision quest. Along the way, Watters, Fiumara, and Fiumara riff off Lucifer’s first appearance in The Sandman where Morpheus defeats him in battle using the embodiment of hope. But hope might not win this time…

With carefully crafted artwork, writing that is both intelligent and down to Earth, and stories that have a distinct feel yet are connected through the wonderful device that is the Dreaming, The Sandman Universe #1 is a fantastic return of comics’ greatest creations as its creator, Neil Gaiman, hands off the torch to other skilled creators just like Morpheus did to Daniel over two decades in the first volume of Sandman. It’s a wonderful blurring of lines between reality and fiction.

Story: Neil Gaiman, Si Spurrier, Kat Howard, Nalo Hopkinson, Dan Watters
Art: Bilquis Evely, Tom Fowler, Domo Stanton, Max Fiumara, Sebastian Fiumara
Colors: Mat Lopes Letters: Simon Bowland 

Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.8 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics/Vertigo provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

The Sandman Universe Gets Its Artists

Today Vertigo announced the incredible artists who will be bringing the Sandman Universe to life! Bilquis Evely, Dominike “Domo” Stanton, Max Fiumara, Sebastian Fiumara, and Tom Fowler will join the imprint as series artists for the recently announced Neil Gaiman-curated line of books. The Sandman Universe will kick off with the oversize special The Sandman Universe #1, followed by The Dreaming and House of Whispers in September, then Lucifer and Books of Magic in October.

Here are the creative teams behind these new series:

  • The Dreaming—written by Si Spurrier with art by Bilquis Evely

  • House of Whispers—written by Nalo Hopkinson with art by Dominike “Domo” Stanton

  • Lucifer—written by Dan Watters with art by Max Fiumara and Sebastian Fiumara

  • Books of Magic—written by Kat Howard with art by Tom Fowler

All writers and artists will collaborate on The Sandman Universe #1, available August 8, 2018. Check out artwork from all four artists, with colors by Mat Lopes above and below.

Around the Tubes

It’s a new week and we’ve got lots on tap. Our first review of Deadpool 2 goes live at 11pm tonight. While you wait for that, interviews, and more, here’s some comic news and reviews.

Bleeding Cool – No Enemy But Peace – Richard Meyer, Antarctic Press and Jawbreakers – A very good read.

Kotaku – The Real-Life Politician Running For EVE Online’s In-Game Council – Interesting. Really interesting.

U.S. News – New Ohio Exhibit Explores History of Blacks in Comic Books – Sounds interesting.

Herald Mail Media – ‘Bam!’: Washington County Museum of Fine Arts celebrates graphic novels with exhibit – Also sounds interesting.

WPXI Pittsburgh – Death Dealer painting outshines Superman comic at auction – That’s some a lot of money.

CBR – Gotham Renewed for Fifth and Final Season on Fox – Good…

Newsarama – Inhumans Cancelled – This is a surpirse?

Newsarama – Lucifer Cancelled – Booooo!

ICv2 – DC Raises Prices On Ongoing DC Universe Titles – Holding the line not so much.

ICv2 – Exclusive: Lion Forge Hires Carol Burrell as CubHouse Executive Editor – Congrats!

 

Reviews

Talking Comics – Barrier #2

Vertigo Teams Up with Neil Gaiman for “The Sandman Universe”

DC Entertainment has announced the creation of The Sandman Universe, a new Vertigo line of comic books curated by Neil Gaiman, conjuring epic storytelling, immersing readers into the evolving world of the Dreaming. The Sandman Universe begins with four new ongoing series, existing in a shared universe, building upon Gaiman’s New York Times best-selling series that lyrically weaved together stories of dreams and magic.

Each writer was hand-selected by Gaiman for the following series:

  • The Dreaming by Si Spurrier (2000AD, SUICIDE SQUAD)
  • House of Whispers by Nalo Hopkinson (Brown Girl in the Ring, Midnight Robber, New Moon’s Arms)
  • Lucifer by Dan Watters (Limbo, Assassin’s Creed comic series)
  • Books of Magic by Kat Howard (Roses and Rot, An Unkindness of Magicians)

The new line will begin August 8, 2018 with The Sandman Universe #1, a one-shot story plotted by Gaiman and co-written by the four series writers. it features art by Bilquis Evely and a cover by Jae Lee.

Daniel, the lord of Dreams, has gone missing and it causes chaos in the kingdom of dreams…

A rift between worlds has opened, revealing a space beyond the Dreaming. Meanwhile, a book from Lucien’s
library of all the unwritten books ever dreamed is discovered by a group of children in the waking world.

Simultaneously, a new House appears—the House of Whispers—joining the Houses of Secret and Mystery in the Dreaming. Its proprietor is a fortune teller called Erzulie, whom the inhabitants of the Dreaming suspect may be responsible for all the strange goings on.

Elsewhere, Lucifer has fallen again, only this time he might be in a Hell of his own design.

And in London, a young boy named Timothy Hunter sleeps, in his dreams he becomes the world’s most powerful magician, but in his nightmares, he becomes the world’s worst villain, which future will become reality?

The Dreaming by Si Spurrier features promotional art by Yanick Paquette.

There is a place where gods are born and stories are spun. But twenty-three years after he was anointed as its master, Dream of the Endless has inexplicably abandoned the dreaming. His absence triggers a series of crimes and calamities which consume the lives of those already tangled in his fate, among them Lucien the librarian, Nuala of Faerie, and Dora, a monstress without memories. But while they struggle to restore the King to his throne, they face from intrigues within and conquest from without. As usurpers circle the defenceless domain and an impossible shadow awaits its own birth beside a rip in reality, the denizens of the dreaming play out their stories of loss and love, resignation and resistance.

House of Whispers by Nalo Hopkinson features promotional art by Sean Andrew Murray.

Latoya is in a coma. Her girlfriend enlists the help of Latoya’s two younger sisters. Using the Book of Whispers, they mistakenly steal the essence of Erzulie, a deity of voodoo mythology. The psychic blowback of the spell causes her house to crash into the Dreaming, beside the Houses of Secrets and Mystery and their custodians, Cain and Abel.

In the real world, the awakened young woman suffers a mystical form of Cotard’s Delusion—she believes she is already dead, and she’s transmitting her beliefs to others, causing them to become guardians of the Gap that has appeared in the Dreaming.

Lucifer by Dan Watters features promotional art by Goñi Montes.

A few years ago, the devil vanished. Some people say he died or simply ran away, while others believe he never existed at all. But we aren’t some people. No. This is the one true story of what happened to the Prince of Lies, the Bringer of Light—Lucifer, the blind, destitute old man, who lives in a small boarding house in a quiet little town, where nothing is  quite what it seems and no one can leave. he’s trapped, you see? Trapped n a bizarre prison with no memory of how he got there or why. Meanwhile in Los Angeles, a policeman who may have brain cancer is tasked with a mission of divine importance: find and kill Lucifer.

Books of Magic by Kat Howard features promo art by Kai Carpenter.

Timothy Hunter is destined to become the most powerful magician in the universe, but that doesn’t mean he gets to cut class, skip exams, or is impervious to bullying by his mundane peers. After all, he’s still a London teenager and having magical abilities complicates things more than it helps. And while Tim’s trying to study and attract the cute girl in his class, there are cultists who want to kill him, believing his power will eventually corrupt him, turning him into a merciless mage. Luckily, the new substitute teacher for his school wants to mentor him and educate him in the magical arts so that he can discover the master behind the Books of Magic…

The Sandman Universe #1 will reintroduce the Sandman Universe and its characters, while establishing conflicts that will be examined in the monthly comic books., The Dreaming and House of Whispers will debut in September with Lucifer and Books of Magic hitting shelves in October.

Check out more concept work by Bilquis Evely below.

Vertigo is helmed by Executive Editor Mark Doyle, who returned to Vertigo last year after over-site of the Batman group of titles for DC, bringing a new editorial voice to the beloved imprint.

Review: The Wicked + the Divine 1923 AD Special

WicDiv1923CoverAs The Wicked + the Divine starts to round its final bend, writer Kieron Gillen and guest artist Aud Koch (America) return to the literal beginning, namely, the Pantheon of 1923 that graced the first pages of WicDiv #1. In keeping with the modernist mood of the time period, Gillen and Koch experiment and tell a 56 page Agatha Christie (Ananke may or may not be a stand-in for her.) drawing room mystery featuring all of the Pantheon members, who have all stayed alive to this point. There’s also a lighthouse. Most of the comic book is Gillen’s prose, which is purple-y, atmospheric, and channels several of the great modern writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, possibly Langston Hughes, and T.S. Eliot, who is racist and pretentious as hell. Large sections of text are broken up by fantastic art from Koch showing the murders is  better than telling us about them and end in a fine, kinetic tribute to one of the first motion pictures.

The issue is a meditation on the conflict between regression and progression, so-called high art and low art (Poetry and film in this case, and possibly by extension, prose and comics.), and there is a driving angst about the possibility of yet another world rending war that isn’t helped by Nazi with a German Expressionist aesthetic, Woden’s pronouncements. And beneath the lofty themes, it’s one hell of a murder mystery. WicDiv #1923 AD is technically a standalone story, but Gillen and Koch make it into a period piece remake of “The Faust Act”  and potentially the whole series complete with a whodunit about the exploding head murder of Lucifer as well as a framing narrative leading directly into WicDiv. It’s a multi-layered showcase for the prose stylings of Gillen and Koch’s ability to tell a visually arresting story in a few powerful panels or pages.

The extended length of the book allows Gillen and Koch more than adequate time to explore the personalities and even some of the personal journeys of the different Pantheon members. Lucifer dies fairly early, and his living form only appears in the drawing of the dramatis personae on the first page, but he’s perfectly Fitzgerald/Gatsby. Lucifer is very new money trying to impress blue bloods like Baal, who’s an American trying too hard to be British like a certain limp wristed anti-Semitic bank clerk, and Set, who gets a sharp, sexy design similar to Desire from Sandman and the prose of Virginia Woolf. He tries to be profound, but is all fluff just like Fitzgerald’s novels. But there’s nothing wrong with having a little cotton candy, now and then.

lighthouse

My personal favorite member of the 1923 Pantheon is Morrigan, who is obviously James Joyce with his free indirect discourse, rapid shifts from omniscient narrator to third person limited, and affinity for Guinness. Gillen uses him as a kind of loner oracle that some Pantheon members find amusing, and most find annoying. But he speaks what’s on everyone’s mind and describes everything around him in great detail letting a little truth shine in the artifice of light dancing, purple prose, and Neptune’s speech, which is the opposite of purple prose. And Koch’s drawing of his death scene is the epitome of modern art with a bleak color palette He’s too much of a wild card like modern Morrigan so Ananke had to take him off the table. This is all in the service and to ensure events run on the smooth side rather than the artsy, mass murdering side because even if she’s less of a killer than modern Ananke, the immortal Agatha Christie will do whatever it takes for the next Recurrence to occur, the Great Darkness to be staved off, and for inspiration to continue. This involves tragic sacrifices, light shows, and silent film title cards because hey, this is the Roaring Twenties, and a little party never killed anybody.

The WicDiv 1923 Special, especially the parts where Set and Baal were extolling the supremacy of poetry (And, by extension, poetry by white people.) while blasting dance and silent film aficionadoes Susanoo and Amaterasu reminded me of my second year at university, circa 2013. That was the year I switched from writing mainly poetry to mainly pop culture and to be honest, mainly comics, criticism all thanks to a professor, who enjoyed ripping student poems to shreds and uncritically banned writing “genre fiction” in our short story unit. (I included as many references to Spawn and Nintendo 64 games in my story as possible to tick her off.) In WicDiv 1923, Set and Baal are angry that the “common people” have access to art via the new medium of film and want things to go back to the good ol’ days when books were chained to desks in monasteries. (They don’t mention monks and vows of silence, but it’s implied in other words.)

This is just like the poets and reviewers of poets I knew who, for all their attempts at populism, were just writing for a small, “elite” group of other poets. But, when I write about Star Wars or Superman or even WicDiv, more people can connect to the themes and ideas in what has unfairly been called “low culture” in the past. There’s nothing wrong with making art that actually reaches people and connects to them. That’s truly how you connect and inspire people just like Amaterasu’s dancing and film, which were inspired by style and film icon, Louise Brooks. (No brooks, no bob hairstyle.)  She has a selfless, democratic approach to art while Baal and Set want to keep theirs inaccessible like the top of the lighthouse, and this is where their connection to the totalitarian Woden comes in even though they sneer at his cheap monster movies, which were super influential on modern film. Who doesn’t love German expressionism? Especially the woodcuts of Frans Masereel, who could be considered as an early comic book creator with his 1919 work Passionate Journey. Nazis should all be punched though.  This is all serves to show that art is subjective and should be for everyone and not trapped in canons and hierarchies and all those stuffy, boring old things.

In WicDiv 1923 ADKieron Gillen and Aud Koch use the setting of the 1920s and the angst of modernism and the world between the World Wars to tell a riveting murder mystery, a wonderful homage to silent film, and a kind of ars poetica for WicDiv. Koch’s ability to shift from cubism to chiaroscuro-lit expressionism and even classic compositions are unprecedented, and all her pages from this comic deserve a MoMA exhibit and eventually a retrospective. All in all, this is a comic that everyone from wannabe flappers and pretentious poets to action junkies and mystery readers can enjoy and probably spend the rest of 2018 unpacking.

Story: Kieron Gillen Art: Aud Koch
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy 

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

TV Review: Lucifer S3E7 Off the Record

A reporter seeks revenge after he discovers that Lucifer has been sleeping with his estranged wife. However, when it’s revealed that Linda is the reporter’s estranged wife, things get messy. Lucifer’s reputation and safety are on the line, especially when a serial killer from the past resurfaces.

Lucifer gives us a solid twist in the episode, actually multiple in what might be my favorite episode of the season and one of my favorites overall.

The twist of the reporter being Linda’s estranged husband is a fantastic twist and done so in a way that’s unexpected and I didn’t see coming as I didn’t read the description before the episode. So how that plays out is fantastic. Also seeing where that goes as Lucifer is stalked by the reporter in a few ways is interesting and we get another reference to Lucifer being at least bisexual with some fun back and forth as far as that.

While there’s a murder story involved in it all, that’s used for some twists and turns of this triangle more than anything else and isn’t the main focus of the story. It’s used to enhance it in this case. The fact it takes us over a large amount of time is interesting too.

Then there’s the ending, which is a fantastic way to end it all and while it’s hinted at in one part of the episode the way the show is framed in the opening and closing has me debating a bit of the episode even more and maybe there’s more to it than the first watch.

It’s that framing of the episode that’s fantastic and something that feels brand new to the series and the writers upping their game to the next level. The show has its usual charm but there’s a next level in the plot here that really feels like the series has gone to the next level with this and I’m hoping everyone can keep it up.

 

 

Overall Rating: 9.65

TV Review: Lucifer S3E5 Welcome Back, Charlotte Richards

A food chemist is found dead; Lucifer and Chloe’s investigation unexpectedly pits them against criminal defense attorney Charlotte Richards; Lucifer makes a shocking discovery that helps with the case.

Lucifer brings back Charlotte and has some fun making us guess as to whether Lucifer’s mother is still inside her body. Watching Lucifer try to figure it all out and cringe at his “mother” coming on to him is a small part of the episode.

What the episode really does is put the focus on Charlotte, continuing a trend this season of break out episodes that put the spotlight on various characters. This one is good as it helps answer some questions and resolve some plot threads as to her family and how she’s dealing with not remembering a large gap of time. The answer is not well.

Charlotte, like Lucifer, is trying to find answers as to what happened and reveals where she went when his mother took over her body. It’s an interesting episode for a character who hasn’t been the most likeable in so many ways. To see everyone reacting to her is solid as each character has their own story with her, for instance Detective Douche.

While it wraps up threads, it also feels like Charlotte is a character we’ll see more of in the rest of the season. She’s on a mission of redemption and like Lucifer attempting to figure out her role in it all.

The murder is an interesting one and while the episode follows most of the formula for that aspect, it also breaks it in some ways too, especially the final reveal.

The episode is another character driven one and is solid. The season has broken its mold a bit with these spotlight episodes and hopefully we’ll see at least one per major character to play out the rest of the season. It adds depth to each and changes things up making the show even more interesting. While “Lucifer” is the title, there’s much more than one character and this is a show that’s stronger for its whole cast.

Overall Rating: 8.35

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