Tag Archives: lettersquids

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Review: Sh*tshow #2

There was once an Age of Heroes, a time Earth was protected by the demigod hero Legend and his band of heroes called Legend’s Legion until one day, the three-headed demon Balam was summoned to the planet. In the ensuing fight, the powers were ripped away from any enabled beings on the planet — heroes and villains, alike. Battered, broken, and losing his entire Legion in the process, Legend was able to cobble together whatever remaining powered beings he could find but by that time, Balam was long gone.

This is the story of what happens after… when Balam returns!

Story: Adam Barnhardt
Art: Samir Samão
Color: Warnia K. Sahadewa
Letterer: Lettersquids

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Scout Comics
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: Sh*tshow #3

Sh*tshow #3

(W) Adam Barnhardt (A) Samir Simao (C) Warnia K. Sahadewa (L) Lettersquids
In Shops: Apr 07, 2021
SRP: $3.99

This is it, fearless readers! Balam is picking off the McCoys one by one, and Legend’s day of reckoning has arrived. Does the Principled Protector of Peace have it in him to put the demon away for good, or should we prepare ourselves to be doomed for eternity? The first story ends here!

Sh*tshow #3

Review: Sh*tshow #1

There was once an Age of Heroes, a time Earth was protected by the demigod hero Legend and his band of heroes called Legend’s Legion until one day, the three-headed demon Balam was summoned to the planet. In the ensuing fight, the powers were ripped away from any enabled beings on the planet — heroes and villains, alike. Battered, broken, and losing his entire Legion in the process, Legend was able to cobble together whatever remaining powered beings he could find but by that time, Balam was long gone.

This is the story of what happens after… when Balam returns!

Story: Adam Barnhardt
Art: Samir Samão
Color: Warnia K. Sahadewa
Letterer: Lettersquids

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Scout Comics
Zeus Comics

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Sh*tShow #1

Sh*tshow #1

In Sh*tshow #1, 1he world once had an Age of Heroes, where Legend, the Principled Protector of Peace, and his Legion defended the Earth from threats far and wide. Then, in the blink of an eye, unimaginably horrific forces catapulted the Age of Heroes into extinction! Now, as people wander aimlessly through a hero-less world, The Magnificent McCoys travel far and wide to showcase their powers for the almighty penny. Led by the drunkard Richard McCoy – the hero once known as Legend – the McCoys try to find normalcy in a world that is just slivers of what it once was. As the dust finally begins to settle, the dark force that looked to conquer the world returns to finish the job it started. Can Legend remain sober enough to put this mysterious force down once and for all?

Sometimes a comic comes along that makes you take notice for the strangest of reasons; the colour of the cover on the shelf, or the way the light catches the foil cover next to the issue you end up finding. Maybe you read a word in a blurb from one of the sites you follow, or maybe you misread the title and wonder what on earth a “shotshow” is.

Well, as you may have guessed, the comic isn’t titled Shotshow, but rather Sh*tshow with a large asterisk – I understood how I made the error, but still feel a touch embarrassed (so I’ll admit it publicly). Sh*tshow #1 is published by Scout Comics and writted by Adam Barnhardt, illustrated by Samir Simao, coloured by Wania K. Sahadewa and lettered by Lettersquids, and if you’re looking for a quick answer to whether the book is worth reading, well it is.

Why? Well allow me to tell you, dear reader.

The comic starts out with the heroes having lost. Maybe they won out in the end, but the victory came at such a cost that it may as well have been a defeat. It’s not a new concept to start the story after the heroes have lost/bad guy has won, but it’s an avenue that hasn’t been explored as much in comics – or other media – as you’d expect given the richness of ideas that we’ve seen in the stories that do start with characters moving on with their lives in the new status quo. Shitshow #1 shows us a little of how the world ended, though it’s as much to flesh out how the world crumbled as it is to show how far Richard McCoy has fallen over the decade since the heroes fell.

Bernhardt balances the before and after aspects of the comic admirably, using the brightness and the energetic hope of the Before to balance out the far more depressive After. Though there’s never any doubt what the outcome will be (because the comic opens with McCoy in a drunken stupor before eventually flashing back to the final battle) you can’t help but hope that the history is wrong as you root for the heroes to pull off the win – though the narration used is at odds with what you’re seeing leaving no doubt to the outcome.

So it is, then, that we witness Legend at his worst, as he hits the bottom of bottle after bottle, his superheroing days long behind him. Bernhardt’s ability to emphasize just how low the former hero has sunk is on full display in the dialogue between the other characters, but it’s Simao and Sahadewa’s art work that drives the final nail in the coffin. Between the moody, oppressive colours and the heavier lines and angles used the book has a real sense that things aren’t likely to get better.

Despite this, though there’s a glimmer of hope throughout Sh*tshow #1. It’s something that you can cling to, a light in the darkness that may be barely visible but is still unmistakably there holding the darkness at bay. For me, this is a comic about hope in the deepest pits of despair and depression, about a person’s fight to beat back their demons and get back to where they want to be. I don’t know where the journey will end, but I’m along for the ride.

I still don’t know what a Shotshow is.

Story: Adam Bernhardt Art: Samir Simao
Color: Wania K. Sahadewa Letterer: Lettersqiuds
Story: 8.6 Art: 8.8 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Scout Comics provided Graphic Policy a FREE copy for review


Purchase: Zeus ComicsScout Comics

Discover What it Means to Live Forever in The Eighth Immortal

Immortality and illumination. Writer Jacob Murray lures comics readers into a whole new realm of fantasy, before purgatory and undying, with The Eighth Immortal #1 from Source Point Press. Alongside the burgeoning and mystical anime artist, Alice Li Barnes, with cover art by Tiffany Turrill.

Curipan has spent her immortality protecting humanity from the threat of an ancient prophecy. But time and a secret trauma have worn her down, forcing her to choose between her duty and her sanity. The Eighth Immortal is a scandalous fantasy that asks the question, should anything last forever?

The Eighth Immortal #1 is slated for release Jan 27, 2021, with three monthly issues to follow. Letters by LetterSquids. Incentive Cover B by G. Bifulco.

The Eighth Immortal #1

Review: Frank At Home On The Farm #1

Frank At Home On The Farm #1

Frank At Home On The Farm #1 is a creepy start of a series that’ll leave you questioning what’s going on and what’s real and what’s not. Frank returns from the trenches of World War I expecting to be greeted by his loving family on their farm. What he finds instead is a dark mystery, his family missing, and only the animals there waiting for him. From there, it’s a frantic search to find his family and a questioning as to what’s going on.

Written by Jordan Thomas, Frank At Home On The Farm #1 is the start to a horror story that’s described as part The Shining and part Twin Peaks. For me, it’s a straight-up psychological horror as I’m not even convinced Frank’s family is even real or should have been at the farm to begin with. Thomas nails the unnerving build of the comic. By the end, you’re questioning Frank completely.

There’s also a desperation to it that Thomas brings as Frank attempts to find his family. While he falls a little short of a complete meltdown, the build of the search makes sense. There’s logical reasons given his family isn’t there. There’s also no sign he should be panicking at this point. But, there’s something off with Frank that Thomas keeps hinting at or is Frank fine and some other forces at work? The end had me wanting to read more and find out the truth of it all.

The art by Clark Bint is a bit mixed for me. There are times I really enjoyed it but others where the style doesn’t quite fit the horror genre. There’s a cartoonish aspect to some of the panels in both pencils and coloring. It’s an inconsistent look for the tone of the series which should bounce between ominous and peaceful. The designs of the characters and town though are solid and a nightmare sequence in the latter half of the comic is fantastic.

Frank At Home On The Farm #1 is a solid start to the mystery that’ll leave you wondering what exactly is going on. It teases enough and throws enough out there to leave readers unsure as to what exactly is going on. Is there some dark forces at work? Is this something as simple as a trip? I think Frank has done something to his family myself. No matter, I want to find out the answer and see where this mystery is going. With a unique setting and a solid setup, Frank At Home On The Farm #1 is well worth checking out for those interested in mysteries and horror.

Story: Jordan Thomas Art: Clark Bint
Letterer: LetterSquids Graphics: Daniel Gruitt
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.45 Recommendation: Read


Purchase: Scout ComicsZeus Comics

Review: Leap M

Leap M

There are many different types of crime stories. Leap M, a new one-shot from Action Lab‘s Danger Zone imprint, is one of the most original I’ve come across in a long time. It has the mood of a noir story, the emotional charge of a revenge fantasy, and the futuristic edge of a science-fiction thriller. The premise of Leap M revolves around a brutal but efficient means of controlling prison populations. This method gives new meaning to the saying, “the only real prison is your mind.” Convicted prisoners are chemically aged to match however much time they’ve been sentenced to serve. Then a virtual reality chip is inserted into the prisoner’s skull. The chip simulates the full length of their sentence within their mind and then runs a rehabilitation program.

After being framed for a murder he did not commit, Wilbur submits to his punishment and is aged forty-five years while undergoing the rehabilitation program. Once he’s released from prison, Wilber sets out to get revenge on those who framed him. Once Wilbur has been introduced and the plot details established, the story moves forward at an enthralling pace. Writer Doug Wood makes the most out of every page as Wilber works to discover who framed him and then sets out to enact his revenge. There’s a lot of visual storytelling, which I always enjoy. Wood generally keeps the dialogue to a minimum. When there is text in a panel it is narration that adds to a scene instead of just explaining what the reader is already seeing on the page. The narration sets the tone and the dialogue and action follow it seamlessly.

Artist Matt Battaglia doesn’t use the most refined or detailed style, but his illustrations fit the tone of Leap M perfectly. His heavy lines and dark shadowing are well suited for a gritty revenge story. The colors used by Battaglia in this comic differ from those of classic noir works. Instead of black and white with the occasional pop of bright red or another accent color, Battaglia uses muted greens and blues. Accent colors are used to fill in the background of panels. There’s also a flashback that is presented in full color. In the flashback, Battaglia does a great job of capturing the ferocity and direness of a battlefield.

Leap M has everything I want out of a crime story. Action that gets your adrenaline pumping, high stakes that deliver palpable tension, and a conclusion that produces an emotional response. I must confess that I’m not usually the biggest fan of the comics Action Lab puts out. However, Leap M has truly converted me. From the writing to the page layouts to the art, this one-shot is a prime example of quality comic book storytelling. 

Story: Doug Wood Art: Matt Battaglia Letters: Justin “Lettersquids”
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Action Lab provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXology

Preview: Leap M

LEAP M

Writer Name(s): Doug Wood
Artist Name(s): Matt Battaglia (Pencils, inks, and colors) and Lettersquids (Letters)
Cover Artist Name(s): Matt Battaglia
28 pgs./M/FC $2.99
Digital Release

In the future, to eliminate the overcrowding prison population, The US Government has created the Leap Machine, which ages a convict to their age of sentencing within an hour. A young dishonorably discharged veteran is framed for a crime and sentenced to the Leap. Now with the clock running out, he seeks revenge on the person who stole his life.

A tight revenge thriller in the vein of Frank Miller’s Sin City with the sci-fi revenge-edge of Rian Johnson’s Looper.

Up-and-coming writer Doug Wood, artist Matt Battaglia (colorist on Micheal Moreci’s Roche Limit), letterer Justin “Lettersquids”, and editor Nicole D’Andria team to bring to life a brutal story of revenge and time stolen.

LEAP M

Review: Maggie X, Bitch With A Chainsaw #1

Maggie X Bitch With A Chainsaw #1

As a child born in 1970s but really raised in 1980s, the movies I grew up watching what are now considered cinematic classics. The movies of Dennis Hopper and George Lucas showed two different sides of growing up in this era. Easy Rider gave birth to a generation of filmmakers whose love for storytelling gave new and exciting visions. Then there are those films made by Roger Corman and Henry Hill, which some looked at as “B” movies while others saw them as simple exploitation films.

As someone who fell in love with movies, these films entertained and kept my eyes glued to the screen. These movies, now affectionally referred to as, “Grindhouse,” were everything everyone had said about them but actually so much more. They showed fearlessness that few film auteurs dare to show today. The stories told were outrageous but fun and enjoyable. In the debut issue of Maggie X, Bitch With A Chainsaw #1, we’re taken to a post-apocalyptic world and a woman with an extraordinary skill set for taking out zombies.

Meet Maggie X, a zombie killing agent, who is going through her routine psych debrief. She’s forced to talk about all her feelings. One would think with all the blood and gore she has seen she’d be traumatized. She’s instead resolute. This world is a reality where zombies outnumber humans and the agency Maggie X works for is one with its own share of secrets. Maggie X has to take on a new partner Jed, an agent who she has had a contentious relationship within the past. They’re soon dispatched to a strip club where their intel suggests a zombie infection has spread amongst the strippers. What they discover is far worse than what they ever expected.

Overall, the debut issue is an engaging story that is both fun and gory. The comic is a must for exploitation film fans. The story by Bryce Raffle is funny, contains well-written dialogue, and is action packed. The art by the creative team is vivid and realistically drawn. Altogether, a story that gives a dose of fun into the zombie genre.

Story: Bryce Raffle Art: Beth Varni, Rodrigo Ramos, and Lettersquids
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

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