Tag Archives: katia ranalli

Review: Seven Secrets #1

Seven Secrets #1

Seven Secrets #1 is a hell of a debut. The issue is full of action that clearly has a manga influence. It’s also a lot of fun and at the same time drops in tragedy. For centuries, the Order has trusted Holders and Keepers in protecting seven secrets with the power to change the world. Now, a new force has arisen to gain the secrets and has no issues killing whomever is needed to do so.

Writer Tom Taylor nails the first issue. The start is full of action and could easily have entertained with just that. But Taylor delivers more. Instead, he dives into the tragic backstory of the narrator leading to… something. It’s interesting in that what seems like a main character is only briefly seen as a child delivering a viewpoint about the situation and our two initial main characters instead. The issue is truly a set up of what’s to come, the 15 minutes before the credits roll for the film that’s about to be viewed.

Taylor also doesn’t dive too much into what’s at play. We know the secrets are powerful things. But what exactly? That remains unclear and in that way the issue builds mystery along with its world. It throws you into the action teasing what’s to come and never quite showing its hand.

Daniele Di Nicuolo‘s art is top-notch. There’s a manga influence to it in some of the action sequences and character designs. Along with Walter Baiamonte and Katia Ranalli‘s colors and Ed Dukeshire‘s lettering, the visuals pop from the page. The character designs are all interesting with a style that’s reminiscent of the fantasy series Skullkickers. That’s not a bad thing at all as I loved that comic in every way. The art team brings a kinetic visual energy about the comic. You can “hear” the action like a big screen explosion and visualize the over the top moments. It’s a big budget debut in comic form (at least the first 15 minutes of the film).

If you can’t tell, I loved Seven Secrets #1. Taylor and the team knock it out of the park with a story that’s full of action but doesn’t forget the heart. There’s some tragedy there that a parent and a child can relate to, even if just understanding the horror, which makes the comic so much more than cool stunts and cool fights. It’s a series that was already at the top of my list of ones I was excited to read and this start makes it one of my favorite debuts of the year.

Story: Tom Taylor Art: Daniele Di Nicuolo
Color: Walter Baiamonte, Katia Ranalli Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Preview: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #49

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #49

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Ryan Parrott
Artist: Daniele di Nicuolo
Colorist: Walter Baiamonte, with Katia Ranalli
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Cover Artists:
      Main Cover:
Jamal Campbell
     Foil Cover: Goñi Montes
    Incentive Cover: Kris Anka
    Unlocked Retailer Variant: Dan Mora
Price: $3.99

NECESSARY EVIL CONTINUES! The Power Rangers are outnumbered! Even with THE OMEGA RANGERS and the POWER RANGERS reunited again, the Anointed have them surrounded. Will the arrival of an old friend—and an older enemy—turn the tide in this battle?

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #49

Preview: Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #44

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #44

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Ryan Parrott
Artist: Daniele di Nicuolo
Colorists: Walter Baiamonte, Katia Ranalli
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Cover Artists:  
Main Cover:
Jamal Campbell
    Foil Variant Cover
: Goñi Montes
Incentive Cover: Kris Anka
Price: $3.99

NECESSARY EVIL continues as the Omega Rangers return to Earth and meet the Power Rangers for the first time! But if they want to defeat Lord Zedd together, Jason, Trini and Zack will have to keep their identities a secret from their friends! Features the first appearance of the Omega Ranger Zords!

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #44

Review: Prison Witch Vol. 1 The Feral

Prison Witch Vol. 1 The Feral

It’s one of those experiences in our lives when we “meet our tribe.” Many of us who grew up hiding who we were, scared of how we would be perceived if people knew our certain quirks, our deepest desires, and love of everything geek, made many of us ostracized. It’s true that the late great Stan Lee made the world of comic books more accessible but he didn’t quite make it mainstream. It took years after that, with an influx of superhero movies, when it became something more than acceptable. It was the new normal.

I remember the first time I met like-minded people. It was in high school. Me and my friends bonded over our love for Hip Hop. Our conversations would go on for ours pontificating on the importance of rhymes over beats, the complexity of certain emcee’s flows, and the content of certain songs and their deeper meanings. I wondered how it would be for someone to find their tribe but find out that they are more than they ever thought of themselves. In Amy Shand and Pat Shand’s elegantly told Prison Witch, we meet a protagonist whose life changes dramatically in many ways when she goes to prison.

In the comic, we meet Cameron. She’s on day 34 of a 5-year jail sentence. Her acclimation to prison life is less than welcoming. This changes when she meets Tanya, who senses that Cameron is more than another inmate. A scuffle with another inmate unleashes what some believe is a demon but is the powers of a witch and catches the eye of the local troublemaker, Bean. Eventually, we’re introduced to a coven, a group of witches also in jail. They have to subdue their abilities to keep themselves safe and each has their own dark secrets.

Overall, a comic that feels like if Orange Is The New Black met Charmed. That combines and becomes something even more beautiful and twisted. The story by the Shands is heartfelt, intellectual, and beautiful.  The art by D’Urso, Campbell, and Lee is breathtaking and striking. Altogether, a story that thrives beyond genres and gives the reader a great story.

Story: Amy Shand, Pat Shand Art: Erica D’Urso, Katia Ranalli
Cover: Jenn St-Onge Letters: Jim Campbell Edited: Shannon Lee
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy