Tag Archives: joe caramagna

Preview: DuckTales: Monsters and Mayhem

DuckTales: Monsters and Mayhem

Joey Cavalieri, Steve Behling, and Joe Caramagna (w) • Emilio Urbano, Andrea Greppi, Cristina Stella, Gianfranco Florio, Ciro Canglialosi, and Luca Usai (a) • Marco Ghiglione

It’s time for more stories featuring your favorite DuckTales characters! First up, Scrooge and the kids meet Huge McDuck, another billionaire who claims to be a long-lost relative! But can he be trusted? Then, Gladstone Gander takes Donald’s place on Scrooge’s next adventure! Will he prove to be a good luck charm, or even more accident-prone than Donald? After that, Scrooge, Donald, Huey, Dewey, Louie, and Webby deal with the “Countdown to Termination” and hit the ice in “The Mighty Ducks of Duckburg!” Finally, there are monsters up to no good in a two-part tale of scary times in Duckburg! Join our friends as they realize that “The Monsters Are Due at Duck Manor!”

FC • $9.99

DuckTales: Monsters and Mayhem

Review: Invisible Woman #1

Invisible Woman #1

Invisible Woman #1 puts the spotlight on Sue Storm. The story takes her out of the Fantastic Four and into S.H.I.E.L.D. Written by Mark Waid, the debut touches upon a role she’s had in the past but not one that’s been used a lot.

Beginning with a past mission, the debut issue has a friend from the past in need of help and kids in need of rescue. It forces Sue to take matters into her own hands to do what’s right and help a friend in need.

The first issue is a fun start. Waid uses Sue’s powers well in the situations she’s put in. It has you questioning why this hasn’t been done before as it’s such a natural fit. Waid also has Sue stand out from other spy characters like Black Widow by focusing on her unwillingness to kill. Those two things make Invisible Woman #1 feel a bit differently than a Black Widow story but beyond that, it’s a pretty standard spy tale.

Where things stumble a bit is the focus on the many roles Sue has. She’s been a spy, she is a mother, a wife, and a member of the Fantastic Four. That’s a lot of hats for one person. She slips from one to the other a bit too easy though. I didn’t get a sense of her running off on this adventure impacting the rest of those responsibilities. A bit more focus on that would add a depth to the story that would make it really stand out. It’d also differentiate Sue from Black Widow beyond the invisibility and unwillingness to kill.

The art by Mattia De Iulis is interesting and rather unique. I’m not quite sure how to describe it but it’s a style that stands out from the rest of the comics on the shelf.

Invisible Woman #1 is a unique take on the character. It makes her more than the Fantastic Four though doesn’t use that to make the comic stand out from other spy adventures. Still, this is a start that seems like it’ll be a fun ride. Waid has shown he can use Sue’s powers to make the action more interesting and the art by De Iulis brings that all to life in a dynamic fashion.

The first issue didn’t blow me away. But, this is a miniseries I want to read and see where it goes. Whether that’s as single issues or together as a trade is unknown. Invisible Woman brings a unique story to the shelves that’s worth checking out.

Story: Mark Waid Art: Mattia De Iulis
Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.85 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man #25

The latest epic featuring Kraven is over but what’s next for the Wallcrawler? The Amazing Spider-Man #25 follows up on the latest story arc and begins much more to come in the future in this oversized issue!

Story: Nick Spencer, Zeb Wells, Keaton Patti
Art: Ryan Ottley, Humberto Ramos, Patrick Gleason, Kev Walker, Todd Nauck, Dan Hipp
Color: Nathan Fairbairn, Edgard Delgado, Dave Stewart, Laura Martin, Rachelle Rosenberg
Ink: Patrick Gleason, Kev Walker
Letters: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops starting July 10! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Invisible Woman #1

Invisible Woman… Agent of SHIELD? A past mission has impacted Sue Storm’s present in this new miniseries!

Story: Mark Waid
Art: Mattia De Iulis
Letters: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops starting July 10! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Uncanny X-Men #21

Uncanny X-Men #21

Uncanny X-Men #21 continues to bring things together as the finale of writer Matthew Rosenberg‘s run looms closer. That impending end, and the relaunch to follow, is both good and bad.

It’s clear whatever is to come has allowed Rosenberg to do whatever he wants with his time on the franchise. Not only is he closing up recent plot threads but he’s also killing characters left and right. At this point it feels like most of the issues have featured the death of at least one character. There’s good in that no one feels safe. That’s also bad in that it gets a little “been there done that.” Still, there’s a frenetic pace to it all which makes the comic entertaining.

And that’s the bad thing.

Uncanny X-Men #21 feels rushed as far as pacing. Scenes which should play out longer feel a bit shortened and stunted in some ways. It feels like shortened scenes instead of a more flowing narrative. There’s a “time limit” that’s working against Rosenberg’s storytelling.

The issue though features the shocks and twists we’ve come to expect in this run. Though it’s not 100% clear what O.N.E. is up to and why what is clear is that it’s a horror show and needs to be stopped. Add in major characters being changed even more and it’s another issue where anything can and does happen.

The art by Salvador Larroca is fantastic. Along with color from Guru-eFX and lettering from Joe Caramagna, the comic’s art matches the pacing of the writing. There’s an energy about it all and you can “hear” the X-Men yelling to each other to hold the line. There’s something about the art that just matches the intensity of the story.

While not perfect, the comic is a fun addition to the current run. It continues to really shake things up and throw in a lot while dealing with lingering stories.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg Art: Salvador Larroca
Color: Guru-eFX Letters: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.15 Overall: 7.65 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Aero #1

Aero #1

Aero #1 is an interesting comic. It translates one story into English for the first time and includes new material as well. The comic is the English language debut of the Filipina superheroine and delivers something that has a lot of potential.

The translated story, “Protector of the City,” is absolutely fantastic. Written by Zhou Liefen with art by Keng, the comic is amazing. The look is fresh and beautiful. The writing has an almost poetic feel about it.

Writer Greg Pak adapts the story and the combination of visuals and narrative is something fantastic. While the story is basic, stopping an otherworldly being, the presentation is top notch. It feels like a beautiful dance at times with a flow about that befitting the wind powers of its heroine.

Pak handles the writing duty for “Aero & Wave: Origins and Destinies,” with a story that feels more focused on Wave than Aero. With art by Pop Mhan, the package feels a bit duller compared to the translated portion. It lacks flow and beauty. But, the story is entertaining and gives us some drama. What it also feels like is being thrown into a well-worn world, a character whose story has been told for years and years. That’s not a bad thing and shows Pak’s skills of allowing the reader to feel welcomed. As a chapter it’s just an ok part but as part of the longer narrative, it’s the opening salvo to deliver future action and drama.

The two stories feel so wildly different in quality not only am I scoring them separately but doing separate “recommendations.” One is a story that has me wanting more right away while the other feels a bit more forgettable. Together, they “introduce” a character, and a world, that’s long overdue for the West and welcome addition. Aero #1 isn’t flawless but it has a sense of freshness about it that deserves your attention.

“Protector of the City”
Story: Zhou Liefen Art: Keng Adaptation: Greg Pak
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

‘Aero & Wave: Origins and Destinies”
Story: Greg Pak Art: Pop Mhan
Color: Federico Blee Letters: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7.25 Recommendation: Read

Comic Overall
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

Review: The Spider-Man Annual Presents Peter Porker the Spectacular Spider-Ham

Explore the world of Peter Porker, the Spectacular Spider-Ham in this Spider-Man Annual!

Story: Jason Latour, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller
Art: David Lafuente, Jason Latour
Color: Rico Renzi
Letters: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle & comiXology: https://amzn.to/2Xu2n40
TFAW: http://shrsl.com/1obvz

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Uncanny X-Men #20

Uncanny X-Men #20

Uncanny X-Men #20 works really well as a part of the bigger puzzle. Pieces come together to form the bigger picture. Key players begin to realize what’s been going on as more is revealed to them and us the reader.

The issue should make long-time readers both excited and frustrated as Matthew Rosenberg has key characters act out of character but also provides reasoning as to why. That’s a key thing with Rosenberg’s run. There are moments, many of them, that might not quite make sense but as things are revealed down the line fall into perfect place. This isn’t a run where you can pick up a single issue. This is a comic run whose entire arc needs to be ingested to enjoy.

This issue focuses on the X-Gene cure with the team turning to Dark Beast to combat it. There’s also a return of the Externals and Nasty Boys for an issues that’s as much a “this is your life” greatest enemies tour as it is wrapping up dangling plotlines. And that’s what Rosenberg’s run is like. It’s both a “celebration” of the past of the X-Men as it is dealing with recent plotlines that remain unsettled.

Rosenberg also keeps the metaphors flowing. There’s much debate about “choice” and allowing individuals to grow into what they naturally are. The groups this can be applied to are many and continues to show the X-Men are a comic creation that can fill in for so many marginalized groups and “tell” their story.

The art by Salvador Larroca is solid. Joined by Guru-eFX on color and Joe Caramagna on the lettering the art continues to look fantastic though never quite over the top. Larroca delivers great action moments but his art run can be defined by the lack of over the top splash pages. Instead, moments are compacted to a page or a few panels. Much like the story, the art feels focused and compacted with a very specific goal in mind. It forgoes the over the top visuals that take up pages without dialogue. The art continues to drive the dialogue and narrative packing in a lot in what it has to work with.

Uncanny X-Men #20 isn’t a comic to just dive in to. The reveals and story are really only going to be enjoyed by those who have followed Rosenberg’s run. It continues recent issue reveals bringing the bigger picture together and making the entire arc that much more enjoyable.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg Art: Salvador Larroca
Color: Guru-eFX Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.75 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.85 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Hulkverines!

A soldier infused with the DNA of the Hulk and Wolverine? It might sound silly but it works really well! Hulkverines collects the three issue series and brings Weapon H, the Hulk, and Wolverine together for the first time!

Story: Greg Pak
Art: Ario Anindito, Guiu Vilanova
Color: Morry Hollowell, Andrew Crossley, Chris Sotomayor
Letterer: Joe Caramagna

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on June 25! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Solo: A Star Wars Story Adaptation

Did you miss Solo: A Star Wars Story in the theater? Judging by the box office, a lot of you did. You can now read the collection of Marvel’s adaptation! It’s actually a good film and comic.

Solo: A Star Wars Story Adaptation collects issues #1-7.

Story: Robbie Thompson
Art: Will Sliney
Color: Federico Blee, Andres Mossa, Stefani Renee
Letterer: Joe Caramagna, Clayton Cowles

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores on June 18! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

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