Tag Archives: jerry siegel

Preview: Uncle Scrooge: Treasure Above the Clouds

Uncle Scrooge: Treasure Above the Clouds

Giorgio Fontana, Carlo Gentina, Evert Geradts, Carl Fallberg, Carl Barks, and Jerry Siegel (w) • Marco Mazzarello, Carlo Gentina, Carmen Perez, Marco Rota, Daan Jippes, Romano Scarpa, and Sandro Del Conte (a) • Jonathan Gray and Andrea Freccero (c)

In “Treasure Above the Clouds,” Scrooge battles playboy plutocrat John D. Rockerduck for ownership of an awesome Incan treasure! Then, it’s Valentine’s Day in Duckburg, and Scrooge faces a firestorm from two dastardly dates—Klondike goldminer Glittering Goldie and brassy business-gal Brigitta MacBridge! And in “Money is the Root of Upheaval!,” a duck tale by Jerry Siegel, Scrooge McDuck travels through time to find riches in ancient Egypt—only to wind up stranded in a dystopian future! Collects IDW’s Uncle Scrooge issues #35-37.

TPB • FC • $12.99 • 96 pages • 6” x 9” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-424-4

Uncle Scrooge: Treasure Above the Clouds

Preview: Uncle Scrooge #37

Uncle Scrooge #37

Jerry Siegel, Joe Torcivia (w) • Giorgio Cavazzano (a) • Dave Alvarez (c)

“Few and Pharoah Between!” In a new-to-USA duck tale by Jerry Siegel (Superman), Scrooge McDuck travels through time to find riches in ancient Egypt—only to wind up stranded in a dystopian future!

FC • 32 pages • $3.99

Underrated: Books On The History Of Comics.

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week:  Books On The History Of Comics.



Last week we looked at why comic book history was Underrated. This week, we’ll look at some books that, should you be interested, will help shed some light on the stories behind the stories.

Marvel Comics: The Untold Story by Sean Howe was published in 2012. Howe decided to write the book because the stories comic creators told in fanzine interview always seemed different from the official narrative. Starting with the comics published during the golden age, and the characters created by Jack Kirby, Joe Simon and Stan Lee, the book follows the publisher’s story to the new millennium up until the creation of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with upwards of 150 interviews conducted by the author.  GQ’s Joshua Rivera described the book as “one of the most comprehensive and well-researched accounts” of Marvel.

Bill The Boy Wonder written by Marc Tyler Nobleman with art by Ty Templeton. Presented as a childrens book, Bill The Boy Wonder tells the untold tale of Batman’s creation. By shining a light on who Bill Finger was, Nobleman’s extensive research led to Finger finally getting a byline credit whenever Batman appears. The book’s presentation is designed to allow as many people, of any age, to learn about Bill Finger – and it works.

Superheroes!: Capes, Cowls, and the Creation of Comic Book Culture by Laurence Maslon and Michael Kantor.  Assembled as a companion piece to the three part PBS documentary series Superheroes, this volume chronicles the effect of superheroes on American culture through the various mediums they appear in, and conversely the effect of America culture on superheroes. Featuring more than 500 full-color comic book panels, covers, sketches, photographs of both essential and rare artwork, Superheroes is an in-depth look at this powerful presence in pop culture.

Super Boys: The Amazing Adventures of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster – the Creators of Superman by Brad Ricca. Published in time for the 75th anniversary of the Man of Steel, comes the first comprehensive literary biography of Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel, the co-creators of Superman Brad Ricca’s Super Boys is the first ever full biography about Superman’s creators, and with more than ten years of research he made some interesting discoveries; the book reveals the first stories and pictures ever published by the Siegel and Shuster, where the first Superman story really came from, the template for Superman’s costume, and more than will be listed in this blurb

The Art of the Simon and Kirby Studio by Joe Simon, Mark Evanier, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. At nearly four hundred pages, this historical look at the art produced by the Simon and Kirby studio is a must for any fan of either artist. The reproduced comics allow you to actually see the corrections done to the artwork such as drawings over areas of white-out, the faint lines used as reference for writing the text, portions of the panels being pasted over with bigger pieces of paper with bigger corrected drawings, the yellowing clear tape… The look into the creative process of these men is captivating.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Ultimate Visual History by Andrew Farago. Detailing the story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from their humble beginnings in black-and-white comics to where they stand now as four of the most recognizable in animation and comics, this book features interviews with the characters creators and other key figures in the Turtle’s ascendancy. With reproduction artifacts from the Turtle’s history, including their debut, this hardcover book is worth looking into for any fan of the pizza loving teenagers.

 

This is by no means a definitive list of books to look up, but merely a selection to get you started, and there are obviously many, many more great books out there to delve into; far more than I have listed here (you’ll find a few purely from Amazon’s suggested list after looking these up). But that doesn’t mean we should stop learning about the medium’s history, eh?


Next week’s Underrated will look at some other aspect of the comic book world.

Lost Siegel And Shuster Superman Story To Be Published in New Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman Hardcover Book

A new hardcover book, Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman, is being published by DC Entertainment as part of its celebration of the one-thousandth issue of Action Comics—the longest continually published comic book of its kind in history, the series that introduced Superman to the world and the title that launched the superhero genre. The collection features a series of essays and iconic Superman stories edited by former DC Publisher Paul Levitz. Most notably, the book includes a never before published 12-page story from original Superman writer Jerry Siegel with art by the Joe Shuster Studio titled “Too Many Heroes.”

The 384-page hardcover book will cost $29.99 and hit store shelves on April 19. Highlights and key Superman stories in this collection include:

  • A new cover by legendary artist and DC Publisher Jim Lee
  • Text pieces including: an editor’s note by Paul Levitz, a tribute to Action Comics by Laura Siegel Larson (daughter of Superman co-creator Jerry Siegel), an introduction by Jules Feiffer, plus essays by Tom DeHaven (“It’s Superman!”), David Hajdu (“The Ten-Cent Plague”), Larry Tye (“Superman: The High-Flying History of America’s Most Enduring Hero”) and Gene Luen Yang (Superman, New Super-Man and the National Book Award finalist “American Born Chinese”)
  • “The Coming of Superman,” from Action Comics #1, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Joe Shuster
  • “Revolution in San Monte,” from Action Comics #2, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Joe Shuster
  • “The Terrible Toyman!,” from Action Comics #64, written by Don Cameron with art by Ed Dobrotka and George Roussos, featuring the debut of Toyman
  • “The Super-Key to Fort Superman,” from Action Comics #241, written by Jerry Coleman with art by Wayne Boring and Stan Kaye, featuring the first appearance of the Fortress of Solitude
  • “The Super-Duel in Space,” from Action Comics #242, written by Otto Binder with art by Al Plastino, featuring the debut of Brainiac
  • “The Supergirl from Krypton!,” from Action Comics #252, written by Otto Binder with art by Al Plastino, featuring the debut of Supergirl
  • “The World’s Greatest Heroine!,” from Action Comics #285, written by Jerry Siegel with art by Jim Mooney
  • “The Superman Super-Spectacular!,” from Action Comics #309, written by Edmond Hamilton with art by Curt Swan and George Klein, featuring an appearance by President John F. Kennedy
  • “Superman Takes a Wife,” from Action Comics #484, written by Cary Bates with art by Curt Swan and Joe Giella
  • “If Superman Didn’t Exist…” from Action Comics #554, written by Marv Wolfman with art by Gil Kane
  • “The Game,” a new original story written by Paul Levitz with art by Neal Adams
  • “Squatter,” from Action Comics #584, written by John Byrne with art by Byrne and Dick Giordano
  • “Ma Kent’s Photo Album,” from Action Comics #655, written by Roger Stern with art by Kerry Gammill and Dennis Janke
  • “Secrets in the Night,” from Action Comics #662, written by Roger Stern with art by Bob McLeod
  • “A Hero’s Journey,” from Action Comics #800, written by Joe Kelly with art by Pasqual Ferry, Duncan Rouleau, Lee Bermejo and others
  • “The Boy Who Stole Superman’s Cape,” from Action Comics #0, written by Grant Morrison with art by Ben Oliver
  • “The Mystery of the Freight Train Robberies,” from Action Comics #1, written by Fred Guardineer with art by Guardineer, featuring the debut of Zatara
  • “The Origin of the Vigilante,” from Action Comics #42, written by Mort Weisinger with art by Mort Meskin, featuring the debut of the Vigilante
  • “The Assassin-Express Contract!,” from Action Comics #419, written by Len Wein with art by Carmine Infantino and Dick Giordano, featuring the debut of the Human Target

Action Comics #1000: 80 Years of Superman is just part of DC’s Superman celebration, with the seminal Action Comics #1000 also released in April and a series of Superman-themed variant covers and even more to come.

Celebrate 4/20 with Dark Horse and Craig Yoe’s Reefer Madness

Today we celebrate marijuana with smoke rings puffing and pluming across the nation. Now that eight states have legalized it for recreational use and twenty-eight for medical use, it is especially fun to relive the hysteria surrounding marijuana as a perceived gateway drug from the 1930s to the 1950s and beyond. And now you can do so in the comfort of your home with Reefer Madness from Dark Horse Books.

Like the antidrug propaganda films of that era, these stories range from comically misinformed to soberly concerned about the influence of Mary Jane on the youth of America. Titles like “Teenage Dope Slaves,” “Satan’s Cigarettes,” and “Hopped-Up Killer” make it clear that the gulf in attitudes between today and the days of Reefer Madness could not be wider.

Includes an in-depth introduction discussing the campaigns against pot by the first drug czar, Harry Anslinger, and newspaperman William Randolph Hearst, with lurid covers from many of the comics and magazines of the day. The comics collected in Reefer Madness come from comic book legends like Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, Frank Frazetta, Jerry Robinson, and Jack Kirby. Eisner and Harvey Award–winning hippie Craig Yoe brings a new collection of wacky, wild, and culturally relevant comics to the mix.

Reefer Madness hits shelves summer 2017.

Preview: Superman: The Golden Age Newspaper Dailies: 1942-1944

Superman: The Golden Age Newspaper Dailies: 1942-1944

Jerry Siegel, Whitney Ellsworth (w) • Joe Shuster, Wayne Boring (a) • Pete Poplaski (c)

Our premiere volume of Golden Age Superman dailies includes all strips from February 16, 1942 through October 28, 1944, and features the first appearance of the mischievous Mr. Mxyzptlk, the menace of The Monocle, the nefarious No Name, Miss Dreamface, “King” Jimmy Olsen, and the kidnapping of Santa Claus! More than 800 daily strips that are collected for the first time since their original appearance in newspapers more than 70 years ago!

HC • B&W • $49.99 • 288 pages • 11” x 8.5” • ISBN: 978-1-63140-383-5

Immigration And Comics. It’s Our History.

ck-rocket-from-krypton-croppedA version of this originally ran January 2016.

You’d have to have been living under a rock to have avoided the refugee and, to a lesser extent, the immigration discussions occurring this past week due to the executive order signed by President Donald Trump.

As an immigrant myself, it’s a discussion that I’ve been paying some attention too.

First things first, though, is that I should clarify that my situation in no way resembled the plight of those from Syria or other war-torn regions. As a white man immigrating from the United Kingdom it would be offensive to those refugees to say that I know what they’re going through. I don’t.

I genuinely hope that I never will.

Indeed, I have been present in my new country when people start talking about “the immigrants” taking their jobs because they didn’t consider me an immigrant.  This was shortly after asking about my accent. I may be a white guy, but my accent sure isn’t from this side of the pond. That’s about as much prejudice as I have ever encountered on my end, directly, and while I found it exasperatingly funny at the time, it does go to  show the general sense that a (very) few have toward immigrants (at least in my experience, but as I said, mine is not the same as the Syrian refugees. Not even close). Even comparing a refugee to an immigrant is a slippery slope; while some immigrants such as myself arrive in a new country of their own volition, some undoubtedly feel forced out of their homes, due to escalating conflicts or tensions at home. But either way, the immigrant has a little more freedom to make the decision. A refugee has no choice in the matter; they just want their family to feel safe.

And the type of safety that the Syrian refugees are currently seeking, and the scale of the horror’s they are running from is something that many of us have no personal experience with. Hopefully we never will, but that doesn’t preclude us from having some empathy for them, either.

My family have lived in England for as long as I am aware (my Aunt traced my grandfather’s line back to around the 1700’s, give or take), so I can’t knowingly claim that there is any immigration within my family’s past (myself aside), but that’s not necessarily true of people living on this side of the pond.

There are millions of people in North American who can trace their families back across the years and the oceans to other countries, when their ancestors left their home lands for fear of persecution or simply to hope for a better life.

This is especially true when it comes to some of the early and/or influential members of the comic book community.

The Thing KirbyIndeed, many of the greatest names in American comics are often the first generation born in the new country, such as Art Speigelman (the author of Maus), Bill Finger (co-creator of Batman, Green Lantern, and many many others), Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (the men who created Superman). Even Bob Kane‘s (Batman‘s other co-creator) parents were of Eastern European Jewish descent. The point I am attempting to make here is that the sons of Jewish immigrants created some of our biggest super heroes, and some of our greatest stories.

And what of their creations? 

Superman is an alien from another planet who’s family sought refuge for their only child from the end of their world. He is far from native to any country on Earth, yet he has chosen to make the planet his  home. Far beyond just simply moving from country to country, Superman is an interplanetary immigrant that kick started the modern superhero comic. 

And he’s not the only immigrant in comics, either; Supergirl, the Martian Manhunter are but two of the early inter-planetary examples, X-O Manowar is both a geographical and chronological immigrant (it sounds confusing when typing it like that, but the character is as rich and deep as any other on this list). Howard the Duck has been trapped in a world that he’s slowly become accustomed to, but was never his own; and Thor Odinson has been protecting our world for centuries – and even without his hammer he continues to do so. The idea of a hero from the stars come to save humanity (or in the case of Howard the Duck to simply work amongst us) is an idea that as comic book fans we’re all enamored with , and in many cases these interplanetary immigrants have become some of the most beloved, and powerful, characters in the comic book reading world.

Giant-Size_X-Men_Vol_1_1In terms of the more traditional Earthbound type of immigration, the of moving between countries, look at almost the entire second team of X-Men; BansheeColossus, Nightcrawler, Sunfire, Storm and Wolverine are all from countries other than the US. You know what that makes them, eh?

If  these characters were ignored because they were immigrants, both of the interplanetary and Earthbound nature,  would comics, nay, popular culture, even have the same face? The Superman symbol is an internationally recognized symbol of truth, justice, and the American Way, and Wolverine is arguably one of the most popular characters to ever appear in a comic book. What if the parents of the previously mentioned creators, and the numerous others I haven’t named who are also descended from immigrants, were trying to escape their living conditions to provide a better life for their families today? Would we still want to turn them away?

If it wasn’t for the sons and daughters of refugees and immigrants the comic book landscape, and perhaps even our way of life would be drastically different than what we’re used too. Before you add your voice to those who say we should close up our borders, take a long hard look at your family history, at the characters you love, and tell me where you would be if the country you call home had refused to admit any new immigrants at any point in the past two or three hundred years.

Would you still be sat here reading this, if your ancestors hadn’t had the opportunity to live a new life in North America?

Immigration And Comics

ck-rocket-from-krypton-croppedYou’d have to have been living under a rock to have avoided the refugee and, to a lesser extent, the immigration discussions occurring these past few months.

As an immigrant myself, it’s a discussion that I’ve been paying some attention too.

First things first, though, is that I should clarify that my situation in no way resembled the plight of those from Syria. As a white man immigrating from the United Kingdom it would be offensive to those refugees to say that I know what they’re going through. I don’t.

I genuinely hope that I never will.

Indeed, I have been present in my new country when people start talking about “the immigrants” taking their jobs because they didn’t consider me an immigrant.  This was shortly after asking about my accent. I may be a white guy, but my accent sure isn’t from this side of the pond. That’s about as much prejudice as I have ever encountered on my end, directly, and while I found it exasperatingly funny at the time, it does go to  show the general sense that a (very) few have toward immigrants (at least in my experience, but as I said, mine is not the same as the Syrian refugees. Not even close). Even comparing a refugee to an immigrant is a slippery slope; while some immigrants such as myself arrive in a new country of their own volition, some undoubtedly feel forced out of their homes, due to escalating conflicts or tensions at home. But either way, the immigrant has a little more freedom to make the decision. A refugee has no choice in the matter; they just want their family to feel safe.

And the type of safety that the Syrian refugees are currently seeking, and the scale of the horror’s they are running from is something that many of us have no personal experience with.  Hopefully we never will, but that doesn’t preclude us from having some empathy for them, either.

My family have lived in England for as long as I am aware (my Aunt traced my grandfather’s line back to around the 1700’s, give or take), so I can’t knowingly claim that there is any immigration within my family’s past (myself aside), but that’s not necessarily true of people living on this side of the pond.

There are millions of people in North American who can trace their families back across the years and the oceans to other countries, when their ancestors left their home lands for fear of persecution or simply to hope for a better life.

This is especially true when it comes to some of the early and/or influential members of the comic book community.

The Thing KirbyIndeed, many of the greatest names in American comics are often the first generation born in the new country, such as Art Speigelman (the author of Maus), Bill Finger (co-creator of Batman, Green Lantern, and many many others), Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster (the men who created Superman). Even Bob Kane‘s (Batman‘s other co-creator) parents were of Eastern European Jewish descent. The point I am attempting to make here is that the sons of Jewish immigrants created some of our biggest super heroes, and some of our greatest stories.

And what of their creations? 

Superman is an alien from another planet who’s family sought refuge for their only child from the end of their world. He is far from native to any country on Earth, yet he has chosen to make the planet his  home. Far beyond just simply moving from country to country, Superman is an interplanetary immigrant that kick started the modern superhero comic. 

And he’s not the only immigrant in comics, either; Supergirl, the Martian Manhunter are but two of the early inter-planetary examples, X-O Manowar is both a geographical and chronological immigrant (it sounds confusing when typing it like that, but the character is as rich and deep as any other on this list). Howard the Duck has been trapped in a world that he’s slowly become accustomed to, but was never his own; and Thor Odinson has been protecting our world for centuries – and even without his hammer he continues to do so. The idea of a hero from the stars come to save humanity (or in the case of Howard the Duck to simply work amongst us) is an idea that as comic book fans we’re all enamored with , and in many cases these interplanetary immigrants have become some of the most beloved, and powerful, characters in the comic book reading world.

Giant-Size_X-Men_Vol_1_1In terms of the more traditional Earthbound type of immigration, the of moving between countries, look at almost the entire second team of X-Men; BansheeColossus, Nightcrawler, Sunfire, Storm and Wolverine are all from countries other than the US. You know what that makes them, eh?

If  these characters were ignored because they were immigrants, both of the interplanetary and Earthbound nature,  would comics, nay, popular culture, even have the same face? The Superman symbol is an internationally recognized symbol of truth, justice, and the American Way, and Wolverine is arguably one of the most popular characters to ever appear in a comic book. What if the parents of the previously mentioned creators, and the numerous others I haven’t named who are also descended from immigrants, were trying to escape their living conditions to provide a better life for their families today? Would we still want to turn them away?

If it wasn’t for the sons and daughters of refugees and immigrants the comic book landscape, and perhaps even our way of life would be drastically different than what we’re used too. Before you add your voice to those who say we should close up our borders, take a long hard look at your family history, at the characters you love, and tell me where you would be if the country you call home had refused to admit any new immigrants at any point in the past two or three hundred years.

Would you still be sat here reading this, if your ancestors hadn’t had the opportunity to live a new life in North America?

Cleveland Celebrates Superman’s 75th Birthday

Cleveland, Ohio plays a special role in the creation of Superman. The city was the home of Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster and, of course, Joanne Siegel (the inspiration for Lois Lane). Siegel and Shuster are better known as the creators of the iconic super hero. While Superman might have lived in Smallville, the blue-collar city considers itself his real home.

Today marks the 75th anniversary of Action Comics #1, the debut of the Man of Steel. To mark that event Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson has declared it Superman Day in the city.

The city also has some super plans to celebrate its connection with this global icon.

May and June: The Cleveland Public Library, Main Library, 325 Superior Ave., where Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster spent countless hours reading and researching, will have an exhibit honoring Superman and the creators. Free.

May 4: An exclusive, new Superman comic will be given out on Free Comic Book Day at comic shops all over the world, including in Northeast Ohio.

May 26: The fourth annual Lake Effect Comic Book Convention will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Atlas Cinemas Great Lakes Stadium 16, in Mentor’s Great Lakes Mall. Free admission. Guests include comic writers and artists Craig Tucker, Gary Dumm, Sean Forney, Chris Lambert and others. Costume Contest at 3 p.m. Visit http://comicsandfriends.org/lakeeffectcomiccon/

June 1-8: Terminal Tower will be lit with red, yellow and blue lights in honor of the anniversary.

June 4: Launch party for Brad Ricca’s “Super Boys” (St. Martin’s Press, $27.99), the biography of Siegel, Shuster and Superman, will be at the Barnes & Noble store in Westlake’s Crocker Park at 7 p.m. Ricca, who teaches at Case Western Reserve University, will speak and sign books. Visit www.super-boys.com for more area signings and information.

June 8: Capitol Theatre, 1390 West 65th St., (216) 651-7295, will show superhero cartoons for free all day as part of the Party in Gordon Square celebration.

The instant store, “The Planet,” will stay open into the night at 6706 Detroit Ave., as part of the Gordon Square festival. The shop will host comic dealers, local artists, caricaturists, and a toy shop including lots of Superman memorabilia.

June 14: “The Man of Steel” Superman movie starring Henry Cavill opens. The Siegel and Shuster Society will host a 7 p.m. showing at the Capitol Theatre, 1390 West 65th St. Society members will speak before the film. Free comics will be distributed. Noted artist Derek Hess will give away and sign a print he will create for the event.

June 16-23: The Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage will celebrate Superman and his creators with events for adults and kids. Check www.maltzmuseum.org for details. The museum is at 2929 Richmond Road, Beachwood. 216-593-0575.

June 22: Superman family day at the Cleveland Public Library, Glenville branch, 11900 St. Clair Ave. Mike Barr, noted DC Comics author; Michael Savene, promoter of the Akron Comicon; and Mike Olszewski, Siegel and Shuster Society president, will appear. Kids can create their own superhero capes, masks and comic books. Free.

June 23: History of Superman in Cleveland Lolly the Trolley tour from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. A drive around the city with stops at important Superman sites, including the former homes of Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. Tour will be narrated by Olszewski and Plain Dealer Comics Columnist Michael Sangiacomo.

June 26: Free Superman event at the Akron Public Library, 60 South High Street, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. with Superman panel. Superman costume contest and trivia game.

July 8 to 14: The Great Lakes Science Center will host a speaker from NASA who will speak on “The Science of Superman” at the center, 6011 Erieside Ave., Cleveland.

Nov. 9: Akron Comicon will be at the University of Akron Quaker Station, 135 South Broadway Street, with special guest, legendary Superman Golden Age artist Al Plastino. Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 at the door. Also appearing will be comic artists and writers Chris Sprouse, Mike Barr, Tom Batiuk, Adam Beechen, Tony Isabella, Marc Sumerak, Chris Yambar and Thom Zahler. For more information, visit

While their original home might no longer be standing Cleveland makes it clear the history that was made there.

supermanhouse

Around the Tubes

It’s the weekend, so I plan on relaxing, no idea about you. Enjoy this round-up of interesting stories from around the internet.

Around the Tubes

Robot 6 – Voice of John Stewart speaks out on Green Lantern death decreeI like how we’re plotting by committee now.

The Beat – Siegel Superman case ends (almost)And then everyone gets a bunny.

The Beat – Sullivan’s Sluggers is back on IndieGogoMore and more I wish I hadn’t contributed to this.

Comics Alliance – DC Announces 1966 ‘Batman’ Comic By Jeff Parker, Jonathan Case and Michael AllredWasn’t a fan of the show, so yeah.

The Mary Sue – Was Robert Redford Just Added To The Cast Of Captain America?Ok… Only if it includes the rest of the cast of Sneakers.

Around the Tubes Reviews

Talking Comics – Five Ghosts, The Haunting of Fabian Gray #1

CBR – Saga #11

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