Tag Archives: jennie wood

Red Stylo’s Cosmic Love Inspired by Florence + the Machine is Live on Kickstarter

Red Stylo Media‘s all about love this February with Cosmic Love, an anthology inspired by Florence + the Machine.

Contributors were challenged to create original comic stories and vignettes inspired by songs from Florence + the Machine. The result is a collection of original stories celebrating love in all of its glorious forms.

The book features stories and art by:

  • Rachel Perciphone
  • Jennie Wood + Josh Segal
  • Vita Ayala + Kat Taylor
  • Seth Greenwood + Angela Zhang
  • Enrica Jang + Y. Sanders + Jan Velazquez + Mark Mullaney
  • Mario Candelaria + Adam Ferris + Lesley Atlansky + Scott Ewan
  • Zack Rocklin-Waltch + Taren Beatrice

The Kickstarter campaign runs until March 1, 2019.

Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The stories are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Advance Review: All We Ever Wanted

When it comes to how the future will look, most creators these days only show us how worse the world can get. This direction may be attributed to the decline of the environment and the primal predilection of man. Things don’t exactly look all that great for us. The stories usually involves zombies like The Walking Dead or the widening of the gap between the poor and rich like The Hunger Games. Rarely do they involve utopias as dystopias create the more interesting conflicts that drives our entertainment.

The thing is there was a time and place where we looked to the stars and though of the possibilities. This is why Back to The Future II was one of the most indelible movies of 1980s and probably most talked about out of that franchise. It gave us hope of what the world could be. Utopias for some reason seem out of reach to the modern imagination. In the latest anthology form A Wave Blue World, All We Ever Wanted, we get several different visions of life in the future where life can be better.

In “The Pilot,” a pilot controls a ship her VR glasses only to encounter an alien queen and her earthbound ally. In “The Weight of Time,” one scientist uses time travel to try and wipe out anti LGBTQ backlash but instead realizes the problem is actually ahead. In “Una,” an alien wins the hearts and minds of the citizens she protects, eventually becoming a citizen because of it. In “Seventeen Souls,” one hero risks it all to save one girl from certain death. In “It Looked like Our Dreams,” two siblings wonder about a future where humanity does save itself. In “Gaea,” mother nature and technology defeat an alien invader in which one protagonist uses to her advantage.  In “Bombs Away,” a world is imagined where violence no longer leads to advantages or problem solving but unity as it was always intended.  In “And The Rest Was Magic,” one woman finds out how it is when one doesn’t buy into the propaganda of a dire future. In “Everything I Own,” one self-admitted pariah slowly builds a community around herself while at the same time, evolving. In “The Inventor’s Daughter,” one woman reunites with her mother after death and returns her to the essence. In “Blackstar,” one man helps people see their future for a cost. In “Life’s A Devil’s Bargain,” one woman shows how hate is more of a choice than one realizes. In “Chat Room,” one awkward girl finds solace with a friend that met online. In “Can you See it Now,” one couple finds out an evil corporation is behind a friend’s death. In “Just Like Heaven,” one young man’s defiance leads to him finding out the secret to the utopia he is living in. In “Alternica,” a man wakes up from being frozen to a world where money doesn’t exist. In “Owning Up To The Past,” one man admits to his daughter, the unjust violence he committed. In “Good Time,” one man’s wish is to see his daughter years after he is released from jail. In “Day At The Park,” a young girl teaches a robot how to fly a kite. In “Choice,” one man designed a robot to have the power of free will, to only regret his decision immediately. In “Seeds,” the grim reaper reminds a retired superhero that there is more to life than regrets.  In “Two Left Feet,” two thieves steal for the love of dance.

Overall, the anthology is an excellent collection of stories that shows that the future can be bright and we all should wear shades. The story are as diverse and extraordinary as each contributor showing off a wide range of voices and visions. The art by each creator is magnetic, alluring, and vivid. Altogether, the world needs more visions of utopias and this book more than proves it.

Story: Matt Miner, Eric Palicki, Tyler Chin- Tanner, Lucia Fasano, Tess Fowler, Eliot Rahal, Jason Copland, Jennie Wood, Vasilis Pozios, Chris Visions, Lela Gwenn, Alex Paknadel, Chris Peterson, Alisa Kwitney, Mauricet, Josh Gorfain, Matt Lejuene, Howard Mackie, Dean Trippe, Justin Zimmerman, Wendy Chin-Tanner, Toby Cypress, Paul Allor, Jarrett Melendez, Taylor Hoffman, Jonathan Brandon Sawyer, Rich Douek, James Maddox, Gavin Smith, Nadia Shammas, Erik Burnham, Kay Honda, Maria Frohlich
Art: Dean Trippe, Danica Brine, Chris Peterson, Robbi Rodriguez, Michael Wiggam, Maria Frohlich, David Stoll, Ryan Lee, Juan Romera, Tony Gregori, Tess Fowler, Chris Visions, Ethan Claunch, Jude Vigants,  K.R.Whalen, Matt Horak, Jeff McComsey,  Gavin Smith, Ryan Cody, Liana Kangas, Anthony Marques, Jason Copland, Eryk Donovan, Micah Meyers, Josh Jensen, Nick Wentland, Taylor Esposito, Matt Krotzer, Zakk Saam
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

A Wave Blue World provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Flutter Vol. 3 Drops October 21st!

215 Ink’s critically acclaimed, award-winning graphic novel series Flutter wraps up with the release of its final volume later this month. Flutter, Volume Three: Rid of Me will be released on October 21, making its debut at the Massachusetts Independent Comics Expo (MICE). In this final volume, teenage shapeshifter Lily gets trapped in the body of the President of the United States who is also Lily’s estranged mother. Forced to see the world through her mother’s eyes, and through the eyes of someone with great responsibility, Lily finally embraces who she is and what she’s capable of doing.

MICE is the first comic convention where Jennie Wood exhibited Flutter five years ago so it’s the perfect place for her to debut the final volume of the series. MICE is free and located at University Hall in Porter Square, Lesley University, 1815 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA. Jennie will be exhibiting at MICE both days, October 21 and 22, with copies of this brand new 110-page full color graphic novel. A limited number of signed Flutter prints will be available for free with a purchase of any Flutter graphic novel.

Flutter, Volume Three will be featured in Diamond previews in November along with the two previous volumes so tell your favorite comic stores to order copies.

Flutter is currently being developed for television by Dark Horse Entertainment and Universal Cable Productions. Featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and on Law & Order: SVU, Flutter is one of the best LGBT graphic novels of 2013 and 2015, according to The Advocate. Flutter, Volume Two: Don’t Let Me Die Nervous is an INDIEFAB Book of the Year finalist and a Virginia Library Association Diversity Honor Book. Flutter can be found in The New York Times best-selling, Eisner award-winning anthology Love is Love.

Review: Baroque Pop Anthology

Baroque Pop is a carefully curated set of comic book stories and portraits from writer/editor Mario Candelaria, who assembles a lineup of talented writers, artists, and colorists to spin stories of death, love, and heartbreak inspired by the songs of lounge pop/sadcore singer Lana Del Rey. It’s part worship session, part extended meditation (Especially some of the portraits), and finally yet another piece of the connection between music and comics as Lana’s music is transposed to a variety of settings from a posthumanist lead off comic from Eric Palicki (No Angel), Daniel Earls, and Scott Ewen to a rock’n’roll suicide epilogue from Jennie Wood (Flutter) and Chris Goodwin. It could also act as a rich introduction to the world of comics for fans of pop music with each story acting as a kind of flesh and blood “fan video” for a Lana Del Rey song, with many tracks selected from her latest album Honeymoon.

Palicki, Earls and Ewen’s “Body Electric” is an interesting choice to kick off Baroque Pop. It’s more of a Warren Ellis-esque transhumanism slice of life than an ode to Walt Whitman or Americana as it follows the life of a woman, who keeps replacing parts of her body with mechanical limbs despite people around her judging her. “Body Electric” firmly has an eye on a kind of utopian future where people don’t care if we decide to have cybernetic limbs to get around easier or even transplant our heads. Daniel Earls’ art is bold and blocky just like Eric Palicki’s choice to tell a futuristic story influenced by the music of Lana Del Rey, who is so steeped in the sounds, ideas, and fashion of the past that she would have been a better choice for Daisy Buchanan in Baz Luhrman’s The Great Gatsby than Carey Mulligan.

God and Jesus are important figures in Lana Del Rey’s song so it’s fitting that Michael Lynch and Mira Mortal did “God Knows I Try” from the POV of the archangel Michael, who is tired of his charges failing on his watch even though the story may be a little hard to follow in the early going for non-former/current churchgoing folks. Mortal’s art and colors reminded me of Renaissance era ecclestiastical art, but with a focus on ordinary people instead of wealthy Italian or Flemish aristocrats. Lynch’s plot is super emotional as the angel Michael is willing to throw away a life of immortal bliss to save the soul of young woman, whose boyfriend has made her rob a convenience store for money. There are long passages of beauty and pain interspersed by staccato bursts of violence, which could also describe Lana Del Rey’s dark pop discography. For every sweet kiss, there is the corpse of a violent, problematic man or a young girl getting dragged off to boarding school. (See “This is What Makes Us Girls” or “High by the Beach”)

Enrica Jang and Jan Velazquez’s “That Medicine I Need” is haunting portrait of a ride or die female rockstar living large and then dying of cancer with the leather jacket wearing ghost of Jim Morrison watching her as she withers away. So, the medicine in the title isn’t something glamorous, like coke or ecstasy, but chemo drugs. Velazquez can do glam though with the early pages showing a gorgeous singer at her peak living the high life with a MTV-rapid progression of images that turn slow and labored as she gets sicker and sick before evaporating into red, black, and shadow. It’s a bittersweet tale, and there isn’t a lot of dialogue from Enrica Jang, but she nails the story’s triumphant tone in the midst of darkness with the line “I’m not sorry I lived. I loved every fucking minute.” Stories like this are why The Wicked + the Divine is an amazing comic, and Holy Bible by the Manic Street Preachers is an amazing album. (RIP Richey Edwards.)

A word that critics like to use Lana Del Rey’s music is “noir pop”, and Dan Charles, Ashley St Lawrence, and Scott Ewen introduce Baroque Pop‘s first femme fatale in the retro stylings of “Summer Sadness”. This story feels like a forgotten cut from Del Rey’s Ultraviolence album with St. Lawrence reveling in gunplay and explosions before slowing into linger in a twist ending. It’s about a man with a secret and a car on the run like the third act of a 1960s spy movie. But it’s all thriller and no filler with Charles giving us just enough connective tissue before getting to the next setpiece. Red is a color that gets mentioned a lot in Lana Del Rey’s music, and it’s present in the palette of ST Lawrence and Ewen’s art in a variety of forms from a dress to a car and even a soda bottle. And, of course, this story has a bloody, glorious end like a shot of pure adrenaline or a sugar high.

Death is more of a pink color in Mario Candelaria and Kasia Witerscheim’s “Cacciatore”, a short story about a beautiful woman’s final days based on the Lana Del Rey song “Salvatore”. A man has caught his girlfriend with another man and is about to execute her, but lets her have one last bite of ice cream while wearing a soft, pink dress. Candelaria’s writing voice is similar to the verbal asides in Lana Del Rey’s songs and music videos and heavy on allusion to the pop culture and music of the past, including Billie Holiday. It’s a lean, tragic narrative and one of the highlights in the anthology

And what anthology wouldn’t be complete without a little experimentation. Chuck Harrison and Luke Marrone adapt T.S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, which are seminal poems about potential and what could have been through the lens of “Burnt Norton”, an interlude track from Lana Del Rey’s latest album. The comic is hand lettered and done on a canvas type background with a rougher art style from Marrone and a looser narrative than the others in the anthology. It’s a moment of poetry sandwiched between more traditional narratives.

The final story in Baroque Pop is one of its most ambitious, and Jennie Wood and Chris Goodwin’s tale of a rock star mom committing suicide and watching her husband try to honor her legacy in a world where women are the privileged gender could easily spawn a mini or ongoing series. (A throwaway line about “the first male president” could lead to so many storytelling possibilities.) Goodwin’s art captures the rockstar highs, but also a rough kind of sadness as the main character’s husband is framed for using heroin around their baby leading to negative media pressure and her eventually death. “Religion” captures the highs and power of music, but also its destructive power just like the songs of Lana Del Rey.

My final note is that the portraits that mark breaks between stories should definitely be used by Lana Del Rey herself on posters or merchandise. They capture her beauty and sadness just like the various stories in Baroque Pop. If you like your pop music darker and a little more retro, then the songs of Lana Del Rey and the Baroque Pop anthology are definitely for you.

Story: Eric Palicki, Michael Lynch, Enrica Jang, Dan Charles, Mario Candelaria, Chuck Harrison, Jennie Wood Art: Daniel Earls, Scott Ewen, Mira Mortal, Adam Ferris, Lesley Atlansky, Jan Velazquez, Ashley St Lawrence, Jim Towe, Kasia Witerscheim, Hoyt Silva, Luke Marrone, Chris Goodwin, John Keaveney
Story: 8.8 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

Baroque Pop, a Lana Del Rey Anthology Debuts at C2E2

Red Stylo Media will debut a new comic anthology inspired by the music of Lana Del Rey, at Chicago Comic and Entertainment Expo (C2E2.) Baroque Pop is a carefully curated selection of short-form comics and illustrations celebrating love, loss, success, and change by comic creators who came together after finding mutual solace and inspiration in Lana Del Rey’s music. The collection is edited by comics writer, Mario Candelaria.

In keeping with the music theme, the book itself is printed at 7×7 inches to physically resemble a 45 RPM record cover. The project was funded earlier this year via Kickstarter, and is published under Red Stylo Media’s group publishing imprint, Red Stylo Press.

Baroque Pop features seven short comics and portraits by:

  • Chuck Harrison & Luke Marrone
  • Daniel Charles & Ashley St. Lawrence (with Scott Ewen)
  • Jennie Wood & Chris Goodwin
  • Enrica Jang & Jan Velazquez
  • Mario Candelaria & KasiaWiterscheim
  • Michael Lynch & Mira Mortal
  • Eric Palicki & Daniel Earls (with Scott Ewen)
  • Jim Towe
  • Adam Ferris (feat. Lesley Atlansky)
  • John Keaveney
  • Hoyt Silva
  • Fabian Lelay (feat Lesley Atlansky)

Red Stylo Media will be at C2E2, table N8 in artist alley. Their other titles inspired by rock music include, Angel With a Bullet, a collection inspired by the music of Tom Waits; Killer Queen, comics inspired by the discography of Queen; and The 27 Club, comics inspired by Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, Jimi Hendrix and other music artists who died age twenty‐seven. The 27 Club was co‐published with Action Lab Comics and was nominated for a Harvey Award for Best Anthology in 2016.

Cover by Jim Towe

Illustration by Adam Ferris (with Lesley Atlansky)

Illustration by Kasia Witerscheim

Preview: The 27 Club: A Comic Anthology

THE 27 CLUB: A COMIC ANTHOLOGY

Writer(s): edited by Enrica Jang
Artist Name(s):  57 contributors, Introduction by Dianna Kenny
Mario Candelaria, Alex Cormack, Chuck Harrison, Shaun Manning , Ryan Schrodt, Erica Schultz, Jennie Wood, Jeremy Whitley
Cover Artist(s): Mark Mullaney
250 pages/ Mature Readers/ FC
$39.99

Stars burn bright and then go out forever, but their light shines on for ages after. Members of the “27 Club” reached musical stardom before dying at 27, including Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, and Amy Winehouse. This collection of original comic stories pays tribute to these lost stars and their tragic legacy.

27Club_Cover-01 (1)

Flutter Vol. 2 Out September 25th!

Flutter215 Ink has announced that Flutter, Volume Two: Don’t Let Me Die Nervous will be released on Sept. 25, 2015. Don’t Let Me Die Nervous is the second graphic novel in the Flutter series. In Volume Two, Lily learns that even a 15 year-old shape-shifter can’t run away from her problems. With her loved ones in danger, she returns to St. Charles to live as Jesse and try to repair the damage she’s done. But knowing her capabilities and potential, can Lily be content as a popular high school varsity quarterback?

To celebrate Volume Two’s release, three members of the creative team behind Flutter, Jennie Wood, Jeff McComsey, and Jeff McClelland will do a signing together at Baltimore Comic Con, Sept. 25 – 27, 2015. The exact time and location of the signing will be announced in September.

In the meantime, Flutter, Volume Two, can be preordered here at a discounted price for a limited time. The preorder discount and a mini comic preview of Volume Two are also available at Boston Comic Con, July 31 – Aug. 2. If you’re at Boston Comic Con, stop by the Flutter table (# D321), which Jennie Wood is sharing with Boots & Pup creator John Yuskaitis. Along with a preview of Flutter, Volume Two, Jennie will have copies of Flutter, Volume 1, A Boy Like Me, and a limited edition FUBAR Jennie Wood collection comic.

SDCC 2014: 215 Ink’s Jennie Wood and Flutter

jennie wood flutter215 Ink’s Jennie Wood, creator of Flutter, is coming to San Diego Comic-Con 2014. You can meet her at the Flutter booth, located at M-06 in the small press section.

Chuck Dixon and Jeff McClelland will be joining Wood at the Flutter booth for a FUBAR signing too!

FUBAR is the award-winning, New York Times best-selling zombie anthology series. Stop by the booth for more information, including the exact day and time of the signing.

While at Comic-Con International, Wood will have copies of Flutter, Volume One: Hell Can Wait, which The Advocate calls one of the best LGBT graphic novels of 2013.

Wood will also have info on her upcoming 215 Ink release, the YA novel, A Boy Like Me, due out 9/4/2014, and a sneak peak of Flutter, Volume Two: Don’t Let Me Die Nervous.