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Review: The Silver Coin #4

The Silver Coin #4

The Silver Coin is an anthology centered around different people finding a silver coin and getting great power as well as being cursed by it. Each issue features art from Michael Walsh and a script from a different writer, who also tells a story in a different genre. The Silver Coin #4 is written by Jeff Lemire and is a sci-fi dystopia story more in the vein of his series Descender than Vertigo’s Sweet Tooth. It’s set in 2467 AD where the difference between rich and poor is almost cartoonish, technological enhancements abound, and a woman is trying to get away from the cops with a few credits she nabbed from another poor soul on the outskirts of the city when she discovers, yep, the Silver Coin, and madness ensues.

My overall thoughts about The Silver Coin #4 are that I enjoy the world and setting of the comic, and Walsh and co-colorist Toni Marie Griffin turn in some damn good chase sequences, but I feel like I didn’t get to know this story’s protagonist and felt a little unsatisfied by how this story wrapped up. Also, the comic despite its “twist” ending really cries out to be a two-parter to see more of the effects of the Silver Coin on the main character. She’s like patient zero, and I want to how she fares in the big, rich city. I guess wanting more is a sign of a good entry in a serial series, but The Silver Coin is connected one-shots. Also, despite being a standard length comic book, The Silver Coin #4 felt shorter than its page length even though I definitely lingered on the gorgeous storytelling and horrifying details of Michael Walsh’s art.

Seeing a talented storyteller cut loose in different genres has been the main highlight of The Silver Coin, and this issue is no exception with Walsh and Griffin getting down to the nitty gritty of designing and chronicling a futuristic world where the income gap is beyond literal. His approach to cybernetics is very body horror with characters using worm-like appendages to “hack” into other characters and take their or money or even their lives. Humans and machines may or may not symbiotic throughout The Silver Coin #4 with the police character treating his tech like another toy at his disposal to protect the wealthy .001 percenters while our protagonist almost holds her breath as she waits for a transaction to go through for her getaway bike. That fear of having enough money in your bank account or that the technology/app just writes is a modern fear writ even larger in the post-apocalyptic wasteland setting.

And speaking of wasteland, Michael Walsh lays out one hell of a chase scene with Jeff Lemire plotting out plenty of tension and obstacles along the way and creating a couple kinds of conflict with the police officer chasing the protagonist as well as her cybernetics taking her away that doesn’t look like a smooth getaway. (It’s relatable for anyone who has opted to take that “shortcut” in Waze instead of staying on the main roads.) Walsh uses speed lines, diagonal panels, and big red and blue color schemes to build up intensity while using smaller panels with close-up of characters’ faces to create a sense of hopelessness that only a magical/haunted/cursed item like The Silver Coin could get the protagonist out of this bind as she surrounded, out-teched, and outgunned.

The energy of the chase doesn’t level out when the protagonist ditches her bike and goes on foot, and Michael Walsh and Toni Marie Griffin introduce a faded grey color palette and a setting that reminds me a lot of 1980s New York (Sans the people) in the first Valerian and Laureline volume. The greys create feelings of nostalgia and recognition as it has a similar vibe to the previous issues when their protagonists find The Silver Coin, and the premonition starts to sink in. Then, Lemire and Walsh kick into epic mode to show the final confrontation between the cop and the protagonist with black bars framing the action as the lines between science fiction and horror blur. However, as I mentioned earlier, the ending of The Silver Coin #4 seems more like a cliffhanger than powerful conclusion.

The Silver Coin #4 isn’t my favorite installment of the anthology, has a pretty one-dimensional protagonist, and a conclusion that had me going, “Wait, that was it.” However, Jeff Lemire, Michael Walsh, and Toni Marie Griffin craft a memorable dystopian hellscape, and there are some cool chase scenes, action bits, and seriously creepy panels of techno-horror. But this is more part one of a two part sci-fi TV show pilot than Tharg’s Future Shocks with extra pages.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art/Letters: Michael Walsh
Colors: Michael Walsh and Toni Marie Griffin
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino Launch Primordial in September

Green Arrow, Old Man Logan, and Eisner Award-winning Gideon Falls’ creative team Jeff Lemire and artist Andrea Sorrentino will reunite for an all-new, upcoming six-issue miniseries titled, Primordial. This mind-bending sci-fi/Cold War thriller mashup will launch from Image Comics this September.

Primordial reveals to readers that In 1957, the USSR launched the dog, Laika, into Earth’s orbit. Two years later, the USA responded with two monkeys, Able and Baker. These animals never returned. But, unbeknownst to everyone, they did not die in orbit…they were taken. And now they are coming home.

Primordial #1 will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, September 15:

  • Cover A by Sorrentino – Diamond Code JUL210009   
  • Cover B by Christian Ward – Diamond Code JUL210010
  • Cover C by Dustin Nguyen – Diamond Code JUL210011
  • Cover D by Yuko Shimizu – Diamond Code JUL210012 
  • Cover E blank – Diamond Code JUL210013
  • Cover F (1:25) virgin incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210014
  • Cover G (1:50) raw virgin B&W incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210015
  • Cover H (1:75) Moon Footprint incentive copy – Diamond Code JUL210016 
  • Cover I (1:100) incentive copy by Lemire – Diamond Code JUL210017
Primordial #1

Review: Snow Angels Season Two #1

Snow Angels Season Two #1

Snow Angels Season Two #1 kicks off the second season of Snow Angels begins here. It starts the final six issues of the series. Milli and Mae have now left the trench for an unknown frozen world. They have no idea what may be ahead of them and must deal with blistering cold and snow on their journey into the unknown.

Written by Jeff Lemire, the issue seems to embrace the white void and unknown. Without missing a beat, the girls have entered a new world for them. They have no idea what’s ahead for them and what hides in the snow that surrounds them. It’s a fight for survival that reminds us over and over what odds the girls are up against. The issue also brilliantly teases that the world is so much more than what we’ve seen so far.

Lemire doesn’t forget the threats he’s already set up. The issue circles back on the mysterious Snowman. Its world is opened up delivering shocking hints at the being’s origin. It also shows that the Trench we’ve seen is a sliver of something so much more. It’s a tease as to where the second part of this series is going and the revelations to come.

The art continues to be amazing. Jock handles the art with Steve Wands lettering. The duo use every part of the page to emphasize the vast whiteness that envelops the girls on their journey. With the use of blues, grays, black, and white, Jock delivers a snowy world that feels deadly and sad in so many ways. Wands’ lettering is solid as he moves from dialogue to narration and the lettering too feels like it emphasizes the coldness of it all.

Snow Angels Season Two #1 is an issue full of surprises. It plays with its concepts of expanding the world by limiting what the girls, and we, can see. But, it also greatly builds things out with the revelations about the Snowman and what the girls discover in their journey. It’s an issue that sets the series on its next adventure and shows us there’s a massive world beyond the Trench.

Story: Jeff Lemire Art: Jock Letterer: Steve Wands
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

ComiXology provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindle

Preview: Snow Angels Season Two #1

Snow Angels Season Two #1

Written by Jeff Lemire
Art by Jock
Colored by Jock
Edited by Will Dennis
Purchase: comiXologyKindle

Season Two begins! The final 6 issues of the 10-part science fiction adventure story set in a brutal world like no other starts here!

Part of the comiXology Originals line of exclusive digital content only available on comiXology and Kindle. Read for free as part of your subscription to comiXology Unlimited, Kindle Unlimited or Amazon Prime. Also available for purchase via comiXology and Kindle.

Snow Angels Season Two #1

Jeff Lemire’s Mazebook Heads to Dark Horse

From Jeff Lemire, the creator of Sweet Tooth and New York Times bestselling and Eisner award-winning Black Hammer comes Mazebook, an ambitious and haunting comic series about family, grief, and loss.      

A lonely building inspector still grieving the loss of his puzzle-loving daughter receives a mysterious phone call one night from a girl claiming to be her, trapped in the middle of a labyrinth. Convinced that his child is contacting him from beyond this world, he uses an unfinished maze from one of her journals and a map of the city to trace an intricate path through a different plane of reality, and embarks on an intense and melancholic adventure to bring his daughter back home.

Mazebook #1 (of five) will be in comic shops on September 8, 2021.

Jeff Lemire Gets the Spotlight with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale!

Before its debut on Netflix, you can catch up on Sweet Tooth and explore more of Jeff Lemire‘s work. Save with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale.

There’s 291 items on sale including Sweet Tooth, Animal Man, Green Arrow, and more.

Save up to 67% on collections and get single issues for just $0.99.

The sale runs until June 7 so hurry up and save!

Sweet Tooth #1

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Jeff Lemire Gets the Spotlight with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale!

Before its debut on Netflix, you can catch up on Sweet Tooth and explore more of Jeff Lemire‘s work. Save with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale.

There’s 291 items on sale including Sweet Tooth, Animal Man, Green Arrow, and more.

Save up to 67% on collections and get single issues for just $0.99.

The sale runs until June 7 so hurry up and save!

Sweet Tooth #1

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Jeff Lemire Gets the Spotlight with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale!

Before its debut on Netflix, you can catch up on Sweet Tooth and explore more of Jeff Lemire‘s work. Save with the DC Spotlight Jeff Lemire and Sweet Tooth Sale.

There’s 291 items on sale including Sweet Tooth, Animal Man, Green Arrow, and more.

Save up to 67% on collections and get single issues for just $0.99.

The sale runs until June 7 so hurry up and save!

Sweet Tooth #1

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

TV Review: Sweet Tooth S1E2 Sorry About All the Dead People

Sweet Tooth Sorry About All the Dead People

The second episode of Sweet Tooth, “Sorry About All the Dead People“, focuses on Aimee, played by Dania Ramirez. It’s an interesting opening as it not only introduces a new character but gives us the world from another perspective. Much like the first episode, there’s a sadness and something magical about it all.

Aimee’s story, begins here.

Gus and Tommy’s adventure begins hitting some bumps and forcing them to find help introducing three new individuals who have been hiding out from the pandemic.

Yes, pandemic.

There’s something unerving and weird watching Sweet Tooth as we continue to experience one ourselves. Characters wear masks much like so many of us have done over the year. It’s a weird experience and in some ways Sweet Tooth feels like the first major film and show to feel like a response to our current life. Sweet Tooth was actually written in 2009.

The episode’s an interesting one as we see Gus interact with a kid his own age. It’s an interaction that feels like something so many of us will be experiencing over the next year as we reintegrate into society. The entire segment is one of fun and joy, a glimpse of hope in a world devestated.

The episode also adds a lot to the world and series. We get hints as to the villains that’ll be faced. And we get some depth to the characters as well. It’s just a fantastic follow-up full of action and emotion. “Sorry About All the Dead People” is a damn near-perfect second episode. It continues the emotional journey and adventure while expanding the world and danger.

Overall Rating: 10

TV Review: Sweet Tooth S1E1 Out of the Deep Woods

Sweet Tooth Out of the Deep Woods

Adapting the beloved and praised comic series from Jeff Lemire (along with letterer Pat Brosseau and colorist Jose Villarrubia), Sweet Tooth‘s debut, “Out of the Deep Woods“, takes us to a magical world and the beginning of a magical journey.

The world has been devestated by an unknown illness. In the destruction, a new race is being born, one that’s half human and half animal. These hybrids face hatred and racism from the survivors who blame them for what has happened.

Sweet Tooth tells the story of Gus, a half human and half deer. Gus is hidden away by his father, played by Will Forte, in an attempt to protect him from the chaos. After his father dies, Gus is forced to step into an unknown and dangerous world.

Played by Christian Convery in a star-making role, Gus has the bright-eyed wonder that makes interacting with kids so enjoyable. Convery delivers a performance that’ll have viewers going through a series of emotions in the debut. There’s a sweet innocence that feels natural and honest. It’s a believable delivery that’ll have you wanting to protect Gus from the dangers he faces.

The series knows at its core is heart. The interaction between Will Forte (as Gus’ father) and Convery is sweet. Forte’s delivery of a paranoid father attempting to protect his son shows a depth not often seen in his comedic offerings. It’s a father and son interaction that is both protective and somewhat scary as Gus’ father spirals in his fear.

Convery stands out but maybe more so is Nonso Anozie as Tommy Jepperd, his unexpected protector. Anozie delivers a tough but vulnerable character. He’s torn about his own survival and is the tough guy with the heart of gold. He could easily hurt Gus, aka Sweet Tooth, and help himself, but he has limits as he states. It’s a performance that will have viewers feeling for Jepperd’s clear sadness and wanting him as their protector and guide.

Sweet Tooth‘s debut is one that’ll have you returning to your childhood roots. “Out of the Deep Woods” feels like the heir to Jim Henson’s films and shows of the 1980s. There’s an adult nature to a story that so far is accessable for younger viewers. It’s a story of exploration and finding more about oneself. It’s a hell of a start and maybe one of the best comic adaptations ever.

Gus’ story, begins here.

Overall Rating: 10

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