Tag Archives: jeff lemire

Preview: Joker: Killer Smile #3 (of 3)

Joker: Killer Smile #3 (of 3)

(W) Jeff Lemire (A/CA) Andrea Sorrentino
In Shops: Feb 19, 2020
SRP: $5.99

DC Black Label Prestige Plus 8.5″ x 10.875″
Everything Dr. Ben Arnell knew is wrong. Who can he turn to? The Joker waits with open arms…and all he needs from Ben is open cell doors! The unbelievable psychological thriller from the creators of Gideon Falls hits a fever pitch and crashes to its decisive finale…or does it?

Joker: Killer Smile #3 (of 3)

DC Celebrates 80 Years of Green Lantern with a 100-Page Spectacular

In brightest day, in blackest night,
No evil shall escape my sight.
Let those who worship evil’s might,
Beware my power, Green Lantern’s light.

Since the first Green Lantern was introduced in All-American Comics #16 in May 1940 by artist Martin Nodell and writer Bill Finger, the Green Lanterns have been fan-favorite characters with millions of comic book fans. From that first ring-wielding Lantern to the latest, and every strong-willed Super Hero in-between, many have spoken the Green Lantern oath and pledged to defend their home sector from evils of every nature. Now, in 2020, this corps of extraterrestrial space police built up from all alien races and places are celebrating 80 years of keeping the DC universe safe!

To commemorate the 80th anniversary of the original Green Lantern, Alan Scott, DC will be publishing Green Lantern 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 on May 20, 2020. The special issue features tales of all of the universe’s most legendary Green Lanterns: Alan Scott, Hal Jordan, John Stewart, Guy Gardner, Kyle Rayner, Jessica Cruz, and Simon Baz, plus appearances from other cosmic favorites!

In addition to a dynamic cover by Liam Sharp, fans and collectors can also look forward to eight variant covers spotlighting Lanterns throughout the decades, drawn by some of comics’ premier artists:

  • 1940’s variant cover by Nicola Scott
  • 1950’s variant cover by Matt Taylor
  • 1960’s variant cover by Doug Mahnke
  • 1970’s variant cover by Neal Adams
  • 1980’s variant cover by David Finch
  • 1990’s variant cover by Philip Tan
  • 2000’s variant cover by Ivan Reis and Oclair Albert
  • 2010’s variant cover by Jim Lee and Scott Williams 

The legendary lineup of creators contributing their talents to Green Lantern 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular include Geoff Johns, Darryl Banks, Charlotte Fullerton McDuffie, Sina Grace, Mike Grell, Jeff Lemire, Ron Marz, Denny O’Neil, Fernando Pasarin, Ivan Reis, Rafa Sandoval, Mariko Tamaki, Peter J. Tomasi, James Tynion IV, Robert Venditti, and more—all with the goal to keep the galaxy glowing bright!

Green Lantern 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1 is a prestige format comic book retailing for $9.99 and available at local comic retailers and digital retailers on May 20, 2020.

Green Lantern 80th Anniversary 100-Page Super Spectacular #1

Bad Idea Has Some Very Interesting Ideas for the Comic Industry

Yesterday, the new comic publisher Bad Idea was announced and teased. Today, we have more details on what to expect.

Debuting in May 2020, the publisher will release one or two single issues per month in a “pristinely designed, prestige-format package” for $3.99. There will be no variants and the issues will not be released digitally, collected into trade paperbacks, hardcovers, or other “bookshelf formats.” That means there will only be single-issue comics.

But, there’s a catch! The comics won’t be available everywhere. Instead, Bad Idea will self-distribute the series to an initial 20 comic book shop who will qualify based on “a unique system of criteria” that includes extra promotional commitments and a “strictly enforced ‘limit one per customer'” policy for Bad Idea comics, among other stipulations. More retailers will be admitted throughout the year to eventually bring that number up to around 50 stores by the end of 2020.

Megalith

The first series will be ENIAC by Matt Kindt and Doug Braithwaite. Other projects are coming from Marguerite Bennett, Mae Catt, Joshua Dysart, Tomas Giorello, Eric Heisserer, Jody Houser, Lewis LaRosa, Jeff Lemire, Peter Milligan, Adam Pollina, Robert Venditti, Zeb Wells, and more. In the announcement, Megalith was also teased with a cover by Lewis LaRosa. Projects have been worked on for the past year in “secret.”

First issues will usually be oversized with page counts exceeding the standard 22 pages or feature “hidden features” and other surprises not mentioned in public.

The goal is to get people into comic shops making each release an event.

Bad Idea is the brainchild of the five team members that rebuilt Valiant and developed the forthcoming Bloodshot feature film. Dinesh Shamdasani and Warren Simons will share the roles of Co-CEO & Co-Chief Creative Officer, Hunter Gorinson will serve as Publisher, Joshua Johns will serve as Director of Marketing, and Atom Freeman has returned as a Sales Consultant.

Family Tree #2 and Family Tree #3 Get New Printings

Image Comics has fast-tracked reprints of both Family Tree issues #2 and #3 by Eisner Award winning Jeff Lemire and Phil Hester in order to keep up with the frenzied fan enthusiasm for the bestselling body horror title.

In Family Tree #2, Loretta and her family are surrounded by deadly cultists and running out of time when Grandpa Judd arrives toting his ornery attitude and his trusty shotgun. But what good is a gun against a mysterious ailment turning his granddaughter into a tree?

In Family Tree #3, the characters follow a lead into the dark alleys of New York City’s Chinatown in search of a cure, while Meg begins to embrace her burgeoning transformation.

Family Tree #3, second printing (Diamond Code DEC198679) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, February 26.

Family Tree #2, second printing (Diamond Code DEC198678) will be available at comic book shops on Wednesday, February 26.

Family Tree #1 (Diamond Code SEP190021) is available at comic book shops now.

Family Tree #2, second printing
Family Tree #3, second printing

Review: The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2

The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2

Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor explore yet another “life” of The Question in The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2. The issue is mainly set in Hub City during the 1880s aka the Wild West. However, this isn’t some John Wayne redux. It probes deep into the racial violence that characterized this time period in the United States. The protagonist, Charlie (who later becomes the Western version of the Question) deals with the guilt of his actions during the Comanche War.

Sotomayor uses plenty of reds and blacks in his palette to contribute to the book’s bleak tone. It complements Sienkiewicz’s scratchy inks. I went back and glanced at The Question #1, and Cowan’s art style is utterly different. Empty spaces, bursts of violence, and shamanistic quests for meaning contrast with non-stop media commentary in the previous issue. Cowan still uses plenty of grids in the comic. However, their purpose seems to be to slow down and focus on pivotal moments in the story. An example is Charlie talking to some witch figure about a primal conflict between good and evil or his friend, Booker, about to be hung in a racially motivated, kangaroo court and not to simulate TV or smartphone screens. Cowan’s storytelling is impeccable. It’s easy to follow the action on the page while mentally trying to pull together Lemire’s reincarnation-driven plot.

The themes of rigid, Randian objectivism versus a more fluid zen Buddhist ideology continue in The Question #2. Lemire and Cowan have traded out philosophizing for gunslinging. (Lemire writes Charlie as super-reflective though.) For all its hallucinations and “deep” observations, the plot of the comic is about a man, who has done bad, making up for it by doing some good. It’s a white hat shooting a black hat, someone more tolerantly minded pitted against a racist.

The traditional Western with a bit of political commentary baked-in part of The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2 resonated with me stronger than the part of the story where he’s seen as more of an archetypal figure. Yes, it’s a great plot device on Jeff Lemire’s part. It allows Cowan, Sienkiewicz, and Sotomayor depict the Question and his ideology in different eras. However, it’s not as memorable as Charlie riding back to his old town in the twilight reminiscing on his genocidal past and how he is going to avenge a good man and his wife. The process page in the back of the comic shows how much black spot inking Sienkiewicz added to Cowan’s pencils. Chris Sotomayor’s rusty palette show that Charlie’s return isn’t triumphant, but a reckoning. He wants to kill the devil and find peace.

Jeff Lemire, Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz, and Chris Sotomayor use the creative freedom of the Black Label imprint to tell what is a damn fine dark Western with some mystical elements. They show how shitty the 1880s were with a loose, gruesome approach to the violence instead of something more stylized. In the bigger picture of the miniseries, it digs into Charlie/Vic/The Question’s identity a little bit more setting upcoming ideas and revelations as Lemire and Cowan continues to jump eras in both plot and visuals.

Story: Jeff Lemire Pencils: Denys Cowan  Inks: Bill Sienkiewicz
Colors: Chris Sotomayor Letters: Willie Schubert
Story: 7.8 Art: 9.0 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics/Black Label provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2 (of 4)

The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2 (of 4)

(W) Jeff Lemire (A/CA) Denys Cowan, Bill Sienkiewicz
In Shops: Jan 15, 2020
SRP: $6.99

DC Black Label, Prestige Plus, 8.5″ x 10.875″
In modern-day Hub City, Vic Sage died. And then he woke up. In Hub City…in the 1800s! The legend of the Man with No Face rides across the Old West, discovering a shocking connection running through history all the way to the day he died…and pointing to more carnage yet to come!

The Question: The Deaths of Vic Sage #2 (of 4)

Things Get Weird as Colonel Weird: Cosmagog Spins Out of Black Hammer

From the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer series comes a bizarre, sci-fi adventure origin story! Black Hammer writer and co-creator Jeff Lemire and acclaimed artist Tyler Crook bring the next story from the world of Black HammerColonel Weird: Cosmagog.

Wacky space adventurer Colonel Randall Weird leaves the Black Hammer farm and embarks on a strange journey through space and time for something that he’s long forgotten with his sanity and life at stake!

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog #1 (of four) goes on sale on April 22, 2020.

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog #1

Preview: Joker: Killer Smile #2 (of 3)

Joker: Killer Smile #2 (of 3)

(W) Jeff Lemire (A/CA) Andrea Sorrentino
In Shops: Dec 18, 2019
SRP: $5.99

DC BLACK LABEL – PRESTIGE PLUS FORMAT – APPROX. 8.5″ x 10.875″

Ben Arnell promised his wife and child one thing: even though he spends his days attempting to reach the bottom of The Joker’s insanity, he would never bring that madness home. No matter how dark the work gets, he would never allow The Joker’s craziness to tear their family apart.

And in that, he failed.

The Eisner-winning creative team of Gideon Falls kick their blackhearted chronicle of The Joker’s destructive influence into high gear with an issue that turns the entire story on its head, with disastrous consequences for Dr. Arnell!

Joker: Killer Smile #2 (of 3)

Review: Sentient

Sentient

As powerful a behemoth the Marvel Cinematic Universe is, it cannot be understated how much it has changed the way we look at heroes. The mere reverberations that Avengers: Endgame has had on our collective consciousness is both heartbreaking and eye-opening. The movie showed the world that heroes may be superpowered but mortal. The movie killed three of the most impactful entities of the MCU to that point, leaving audiences in a gasp and many in tears.

This was not the first time the MCU had fans in tears and it probably won’t be the last. It’s the first time I remember seeing a heartfelt story onscreen was Next Avengers: Heroes Of Tomorrow.  The movie centers around the children of the Avengers in a dystopian future. It’s a world where Ultron has killed all their parents. The movie asks a very important question, “Have you prepared your children for a life without you?” Jeff Lemire and Gabriel Walta’s thought-provoking Sentient is a similar premise to that animated movie and explores that very question.

We’re taken to the USS Montgomery a ship that houses a crew and their family along with artificial intelligence, Valeria, that watches over them. Separatists dissent on the Earth colony has the Space Navy and the Montgomery sees betrayal among its own. Post tragedy, the story shifts to one of survival as the surviving children of the Montgomery must learn to function in a ship without their parents and adapt to their new situation. It’s a story of survival in the physical and emotional sense.

Sentient is a truly original science fiction story that borrows traces of Lord of the Flies and Bicentennial Man infused with the human journey to beat insurmountable odds. The story by Lemire is heartfelt, harrowing, and redemptive. The art by Walta, Wands, Fletcher, and Powell is superb. Altogether, a story that shows the answer to the question, that if you can ever prepare your children for the unthinkable and to trust that you that your nurture leads to their better natures.

Story: Jeff Lemire
Art: Gabriel Walta, Steve Wands, Jared K Fletcher, and Jeff Powell
Story: 10 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: Inferior Five #4 (of 12)

Inferior Five #4 (of 12)

(W) Keith Giffen, Jeff Lemire, Jeff Lemire (A) Keith Giffen, Michelle Delecki, Jeff Lemire (CA) Scott Koblish
In Shops: Dec 04, 2019
SRP: $3.99

Seems like old times…or does it? In the days following the Invasion, the Tasmanian Devil pulverizes a certain cosmic starfish from space (and gets pulverized in return!), while the Peacemaker streaks across Russian skies to battle the Rocket Reds! And when you see the alien monsters descend on Dangerfield, Arizona, it’ll be more like “screams like old times!”

Inferior Five #4 (of 12)
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