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Review: Kaiju Score #4

The heist is off the rails but will it be pulled off while two kaiju fight to the death? Kaiju Score #4 wraps up the entertaining twist of a crime comic.

Story: James Patrick
Art: Rem Broo
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics

AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: The Kaiju Score #4

THE KAIJU SCORE #4

Writer: James Patrick 
Artist and Colorist: Rem Broo 
Letterer: Dave Sharpe 
Main Cover: Rem Broo
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 02.24.21

MORE STORY! MORE ART! MORE KAIJU! 

The good news is that the crew for the Kaiju Score is very close to pulling off a heist that will set them up for the rest of their lives. The bad news is that two kaiju are tearing the city apart as they try to finish the job. It’s all on the line now: tens of millions in art, their very lives, and even their souls. It’s going to end one way or another, and not everyone is going to make it out alive.  

The final chapter in the first story arc of this exciting franchise being developed as a film by Sony Pictures!

THE KAIJU SCORE #4

Review: Kaiju Score #3

Take your typical story about an elaborate robbery but add in the obstacle of a Kaiju attack. That’s the concept of Kaiju Score, a series whose buzz is well justified.

Story: James Patrick
Art: Rem Broo
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Kaiju Score #2

Kaiju Score #2

Kaiju Score takes the typical heist story and gives it a twist with kaiju being the real obstacle to success. Kaiju Score #1 did a solid job of setting up the crime, the characters, and the stakes. Kaiju Score #2 twists things a bit by throwing in obstacles many of which are unexpected and all add to the over-the-top nature of the concept.

Written by James Patrick, the second goes as expected but does so in unexpected ways. There’s some solid work done in the storytelling aspect that adds details that makes things a bit more “believable”. Our team of thieves has to prepare for their score and wait for the perfect time to do their thing. By adding the fact that they had to wait and there were false starts makes things a bit easier to accept and swallow as a concept. That sort of detail grounds the story in some ways.

Patrick has foreshadowed the series pretty clearly. This is a heist that’s going to go off the rails and we as readers are supposed to just enjoy the disaster of a ride. Each character has a fault and each can bring it all to an end. The question is, which one will be the cause of things going wrong and how? It’s all not an if but a when.

Kaiju Score #2 delivers some of that as things quickly begin to go wrong and it’s far more than just one thing. Patrick takes our expectations and the obvious and twists it a bunch delivering obstacles we didn’t expect. There’s a bit of a feint to it all and it works really well.

Everything looks slick and cool due to the art of Rem Broo who’s joined by Dave Sharpe. The art style is distinct and unique. It gives Kaiju Score #2 an interesting look that plays off the pulp heist aspect of it all. The characters look good, the action is solid, and even the team waiting around is interesting. There’s small details that add to the experience and punctuate the laughs. I’m note sure the series would work as well with a different art style, this is one that just works and works really well with the tone of it all.

Kaiju Score #2 takes us in an expected direction but does it in a way that’s not expected at all. We know things are going to go wrong. The issue delivers that relatively quickly and then piles onto it all and does so in a direction that’s not what was set up. It’s a fun second issue that keeps the reader on their toes awaiting the next trap to go off and up the difficulty level of the heist.

Story: James Patrick Art: Rem Broo Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.1 Art: 8.1 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Buy

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Review: Kaiju Score #1

Take your typical story about an elaborate robbery but add in the obstacle of a Kaiju attack. That’s the concept of Kaiju Score, a new series whose buzz is well justified.

Story: James Patrick
Art: Rem Broo
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Exclusive Preview: The Kaiju Score #1

THE KAIJU SCORE #1

Writer: James Patrick 
Artist and Colorist: Rem Broo 
Letterer: Dave Sharpe 
Cover: Rem Broo 
Incentive Cover: Mark Nelson
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale November 25th

It’s the most dangerous heist ever attempted. Four desperate criminals are going all in on a once-in-a-lifetime chance to steal millions in art and turn their miserable lives around. The catch? They have to pull it off under the nose of a one thousand-ton Kaiju. And a giant monster might just be the least of their problems.  

Brought to you by James Patrick (Grimm Fairy Tales, Death Comes to Dillinger, The Monsters of Jimmy Crumb) and Rem Broo (The End Times of Bram and Ben, Terminal Protocol), THE KAIJU SCORE is what happens when a Quentin Tarantino film takes place smack in the middle of a Godzilla movie.

THE KAIJU SCORE#1

Sony Nabs The Kaiju Score from James Patrick, Rem Broo, Dave Sharpe, and AfterShock

AfterShock has announced that Sony has cut a deal to bring The Kaiju Score to the big screen. Being published by AfterShock, the comic is by writer James Patrick, artist and colorist Rem Broo, and letterer Dave Sharpe. The comic releases in November and is described as:

It’s the most dangerous heist ever attempted. Four desperate criminals are going all in on a once-in-a-lifetime chance to steal millions in art and turn their miserable lives around. The catch? They have to pull it off under the nose of a one thousand-ton kaiju. And a giant monster might just be the least of their problems.

Escape Artists’ Todd Black, Jason Blumenthal, and Steve Tisch will produce, along with Tony Shaw who brought the property into Sony. AfterShock Comics’ Lee Kramer and Jon Kramer will also produce.

Jiao Chen is overseeing the project for Sony Pictures. Sony Pictures’ Drew Reed and Jake Bauman were instrumental in the deal, as was Rive Gauche Television with Steve Burkow of Ziffren, Brittenham, who negotiated on behalf of AfterShock.

The Kaiju Score

How Do You Steal from a Kaiju? Found Out in The Kaiju Score!

It’s the most dangerous heist ever attempted. Four desperate criminals are going all in on a once-in-a-lifetime chance to steal millions in art and turn their miserable lives around. The catch? They have to pull it off under the nose of a one thousand-ton kaiju. And a giant monster might just be the least of their problems.

AfterShock has announced The Kaiju Score, a new comic series coming to stores this November.

The Kaiju Score is by writer James Patrick, artist and colorist Rem Broo, letterer Dave Sharpe, and featuring a cover by Broo. The Kaiju Score is out on November 25, 2020.

The Kaiju Score

Review: Imposter #1

port_imposter_coverOne of the most exciting publishers to have emerged over the past months is 21 Pulp. Their first miniseries, Hero Hourly is effortlessly funny, and is well worth tracking the eventual trade when it’s released.

Now before we go any further, this review will not be entirely spoiler free. I’ll do my best not to ruin the first issue, but if you want a completely spoiler free review, then you can check out the advanced review here. Or you can buy the book; it’s brilliant, and I’m going to tell you now that you’re going to want to add Imposter to your pull list.

I said in the advance review that the back of the comic says;

The Centipede is Black City’s crime vigilante. Captain Apex is Earth’s cosmic defender. Dr. Oculus is a sorcerer who fights demons from other realms. And Jungle Jack is the hero of the Wild Lands. All four of them are connected by a dangerous secret that could destroy the world, and Hale Barker just learned what it is.

And oh boy, what a secret! While I won’t tell you what it is (even in a slightly spoiler filled review, I still can’t bring myself to reveal what it is. The secret is revealed – or at least strongly hinted at – on the publisher’s website, however), what I will say is that the reveal is both incredibly well handled, and the secret itself is actually remarkably original. At least, as far as I’m aware; read the book, and if I’m wrong let me know in the comments below.

Imposter #1 is a very well written, brilliantly illustrated comic with a central plot point that I want to talk about that I want to discuss in at least a small amount of detail, but that’ll be in another review. To get a feeling of this series, the opening issue has an almost Batman like feel with an added dash of the pulp vigilantes from the 30’s, and yet the comic transcends that comparison in so many ways.

Having read the first issue of this series more than a month ago, I can honestly say that I was excited to open the digital file again for this review (and I’m really looking forward to getting two print versions on Wednesday – one for myself and one for a friend), only to find that the comic was as good as I remember it being. I especially  enjoyed the teaser of Jetpack Jump in the back of the issue, too, and it’s nice to see the first few pages of what looks to be an interesting comic.

This first issue of Imposter is every bit as good as 21 Pulp‘s other series Hero Hourly, which I have a LOT of love for. Despite being written by the same man, the only things that Imposter has in common with Hero Hourly is that they’re both bloody brilliant.

Story: James Patrick Pencils and Inks: Martin Szymanski Colors: Omscaro Valladao 
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Although 21 Pulp provided Graphic Policy a FREE copy for review, I’m buying it anyway.

James Patrick Talks To Us About 21 Pulp’s Exciting New Line Of Comics

HERO HOURLY COVERDo you know who one of the best new publishers, and pound for pound one of the best around period, are? If you guessed 21 Pulp, you’d be absolutely right. While I admit that with only two comics published as of the end of January (although I was able to read the first issue of Imposter – it’s great), that may seem like an overly inflated hyperbolic statement, but you tell me if you think I’m wrong after you’ve read the two issues of Hero Hourly that are out right now.

Alex had the opportunity to talk with the man behind 21 Pulp, and the writer of the publisher’s first two comics, James Patrick, about where things stood, and how things have progressed since we last checked in back in September.

Graphic Policy: It’s been a few months since we last spoke; how have things over at 21 Pulp been?

James Patrick: Really good. I guess that’s how to best sum it up. There are good things, and there are things we’re trying to improve as a company.

The good has been reaction to our books. The people who’ve read them genuinely seem to be enjoying them or are ecstatic about them. Hero Hourly‘s reaction, the pre-release reaction to Imposter by the few who’ve read it, and people who are anticipating our other books like Planet of the Dinosaurs.

If I were to say there’s been a disappointment it’s that the quantity of reaction. And that may just be us being impatient. We only have a few books out, we’re slowly getting traction, and that comes with time. Especially when you’re not coming out of the gate with names like Warren Ellis or Jim Lee. When you’re building on the hooks of your products and what we feel is the quality. It’s a mountain to climb. It’s also why we’re not releasing a whole bunch of books at once. We want everyone to read our books whether they’ll love or hate them, though – to give them a shot.

A good example of this has been reviews, which have been stellar, but which there haven’t been a ton of. There’s just so much product out there competing, new companies popping up all the time, and everyone wants to run reviews of books that will get them hits, recognized books, and they honestly don’t trust us yet.

But I’ll also say that when those books get into people’s hands, we see results. In other areas other than just readers.
Like how we’ve seen success with distribution avenues outside of Diamond, how retailers have responded, how our numbers keep growing – it’s all been very fascinating. Every single one of our books has been in one or multiple subscription boxes. We feel like that’s because of their quality and their shelf/box appeal.

So yeah, good things in certain places, improvement needed in others.

GP: How different was funding and publishing the first issue of Hero Hourly through Kickstarter compared with the first issue of Imposter?

JP: Very, since Hero Hourly was successful and Imposter wasn’t. Heh.

Firstly, funding isn’t necessarily the goal of our Kickstarters, and I’m only saying this so I can give the most accurate answer as possible. We see Kickstarters as a way to do some market research, general marketing, a unique way to provide extras for fans with the books, and, yes, partly revenue. And the reason I’m saying this is because if you look at Imposter it wasn’t funded, but it’s still being published. So we don’t rely on the Kickstarters, but they offer a piece to the puzzle, so to speak – and if we can learn to do it effectively, then it’s a great bonus to what we’re doing.

But the two were vastly different from start to finish. Imposter actually went on Kickstarter before Hero Hourly, and we learned from that that we weren’t marketing it properly. We also learned a way not to approach a Kickstarter. Our approach with Imposter turned out to be confusing, not marketing savvy, and was insight maybe to which books work on Kickstarter and which don’t – at least for us.

Now, either we took what we learned from Imposter, or Hero Hourly was just a better candidate for Kickstarter, or a combination of those two things, and we went out and did very well with a Hero Hourly Kickstarter. We had a great hook and we explained it simply and in a way people could relate. The difference was success. None of the means Hero Hourly is a better book, just that different books may have different audiences and different ways to be presented.

HERO HOURLY PREVIEW PAGE 01GP: With two issues of Hero Hourly published, the third on the way, how has the reaction been for the comic?

JP: Stellar, with the disclaimer of what I said above. We hear a lot of “this is what the industry is missing” and “this is the funniest book out.” People are relating to it, too. Connecting with Saul’s trouble, the situations he finds at work, which are basically any job.

The few criticisms are it’s too raunchy, but we understood when you put a book that foul-mouthed out there that’s one of the risks.

New reviews pop up frequently and people are just glad to have discovered it. We really do want to build enough word-of-mouth and momentum to do a sequel, but time will tell.

GP: So what you’re saying is that even though 21 Pulp isn’t focusing on a long running series yet, that doesn’t mean we won’t revisit the world of Hero Hourly for some new stories down the road?

JP: Correct. I’m ready to go if we feel Hero Hourly justifies a sequel. Saul‘s story is done, though – for now. It would be a different character or character with a new story in that world, at that employer.

Imposter has the option to go long-form as well. It all works as both. But Imposter is made so that the long-form continues a more natural arc, if need be.

GP: Yeah, the buzz for Hero Hourly that I’ve seen both online and heard in my local comic shop has been phenomenal. I understand that both issues have sold out at Diamond; are there any plans to do a second printing, or collect the series in a trade paperback down the road?

JP: The trade follows the singles, yes. It’s already been solicited and will come out after Issue 3 sometime, about a month later.

We don’t feel the need to go to second printings yet – partially because there’s a trade coming.

imposter_cover.jpgGP: You have Imposter debuting in a couple of weeks [February 10th]; I was fortunate enough to read an advance copy, and I really enjoyed it. What can you tell us about the comic without verging onto spoiler territory?

JP: Wow. That’s hard. There’s so much I can say about Imposter. The easiest way to describe it is that there a bunch of different archetype characters – a crime vigilante like Batman or the Spirit, a sc-fi character like Buck Rogers, a Dr. Strange-like character, and a jungle adventurer – and they’re all connected by a secret.

I guess I’ll just say that what makes it unique is that it crosses into so many genres. Each issue can be a different genre and story that supports the overall story, or it can seamlessly cut between the genres. That and that it’s a dense story told on a huge canvas – all while being about one thing. How lies can erode a person and the people around them. The consequences of having to tell lies to make the world a safer place.

If you want a crime, sci-fi, sorcery, and jungle adventure all in one, I guess it’s the perfect book for people. Ha.

jetpackjump_cover GP: Jetpack Jump is the next book your releasing, and from the sneak peak we saw in the back of Imposter, it looks like it’s an entirely different setting for the story than the two series released already. I know you said the last time we spoke that you goal was to release excellent comics (and that’s certainly been the case so far), are you also aiming to publish stories in multiple genres as well, or is that a happy coincidence?

JP: We have a brand that we’re inching towards perfecting, but I’m not going to completely reveal what that is yet. All I’ll say for now is that that brand isn’t necessarily a genre or a style. And if you look at Jetpack Jump, it’s a lot of fun and different in tone from Imposter or Hero Hourly. It’s like a suped up Saturday morning cartoon. It’s all out action and high-octane. Right now we’re making the best books we can and chiseling into what we want to be.

Sorry to be so cryptic :) but we really are just about making the best books and building who we are with the parts that add up to it, rather than saying, we are this or that. At least not yet.

GP: There’s actually a lot I want to ask you about Imposter, but I’ll hold off on that so folks can get a chance to read an issue or two… so moving before I slip up and do that; with Imposter #1 hitting the racks on February 10th, and Hero Hourly #3 later that month, when can we expect the debut issues of Jetpack Jump and Planet of the Dinosaurs to hit the physical and digital racks?

JP: Jetpack Jump Issue 1 will be available online when Imposter #1 hits shelves. So by Feb 10th. It’s four issues, It’s a bit of an experiment as the previews in the back of Imposter and Hero Hourly #3 throw back to it. Planet of the Dinosaurs is penciled in to follow Imposter.

We had a far more aggressive approach to publishing, but we’re learning to let people get to know us first rather than releasing books too soon and before we have the potential exposure of our brand.

It’s always an evolving thing as we learn more each day.

GP: The last time we spoke, when given the choice of pirates, ninjas, cowboys and aliens, you went for Frank Miller ninjas. What if vikings replaced ninjas?

JP: Cowboys. Aren’t enough freakin’ cowboys in comics.

GP: I really appreciate your time James, thank you!


Imposter #1 is due to hit shelves February 10th. Do you have your copy reserved?

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