Tag Archives: irene koh

FlameCon 2018: The Panels

To go along with an environment free of toxicity and full of heartfelt enthusiasm to go with the water stations, pronoun stickers, and the best press lounge in my five years of covering conventions, Flame Con also had nuanced panels on a variety of comics and pop culture topics with panelists, who represented a broad spectrum of voices and experiences. I attended three panels at the con: “Fan Activists Assemble!” about practical ways members of fandom can effect sociopolitical change, “Fangirl… But then Make It Fashion” an entertaining, yet wide ranging panel about the larger cultural context of character designs and costumes, and “Telling All Ages Queer Stories” about LGBTQ representation in all ages comics.

Jay Edidin and Elana Levin

Fan Activists Assemble! (Saturday)

Fan Activists Assemble” was hosted by Elana Levin of Graphic Policy Radio, who also trains digital organizes and is a new media mentor and also featured a guest appearance from journalist and podcaster Jay Edidin of Jay and Miles X-Plain the X-Men fame. Pop culture has always been intertwined with her activism beginning with her love for the X-Men comics, and her current passion is bridging those two worlds via the tool of the Internet. She also talked about how social media and the ability for protests to “trend” has helped the way they are viewed in society unlike in the past when protesters were arrested or beat up by the police, and their narrative was shaped by traditional news media.

As Stephen Duncombe said, “Scratch an activist, and you’re apt to find a fan.” At the beginning of her talk, Elana Levin stated many strengths that fans can bring to the world of activism, including community building, thinking beyond the world we exist in, and practical skills like art, writing, social media posting, and even meme and GIF making. Fans don’t have to reinvent the wheel and form their own organization and can bring their talents and fresh POV to existing organizations from larger ones like GLAAD or the ACLU to smaller, local ones.

Next, Levin brought in Jay Edidin as a case study of fan activism when he confronted Dark Horse Comics for having healthcare that excluded any coverage “…related to gender dysphoria and transition” while claiming to be an LGBTQ friendly company and featuring the Pride flag on their Twitter profile. Edidin used to be an employee of Dark Horse Comics and has been a journalist since 2007. He couldn’t go public for a while because his ex-husband worked for Dark Horse, but seeing the company’s Pride Day tweet led to him confronting the company. With the help of comic book creator, Mariah McCourt, an open letter stating a demand for expanding Dark Horse’s healthcare coverage was drafted and signed by many comics professionals. Dark Horse changed their policy a day before the letter went public.

Elana Levin showed that this action fit an effective four part organizational strategy. There was the goal, which was for Dark Horse Comics to have trans inclusive healthcare, the target was upper management because they have the power to effect change in the company, the “ask” was for comics creators to sign the open letter, and the message was for Dark Horse to basically put their money where their mouth is and support the LGBTQ community through their actions and not just through rainbow logos. Jay Edidin added that using the letter format was important because comics creators are vulnerable on their own.

Later, in the panel, Elana Levin gave examples of how social media and hashtags are able to shape discussions like the conversation around having an Asian American Iron Fist that cast a shadow over Finn Jones’ eventual casting as him in the Marvel Netflix show. Even if this didn’t end in a “win”, it started a conversation, and Marvel later did some race bent casting by having Tessa Thompson play Valkyrie in Thor Ragnarok and Zazie Beetz play Domino in Deadpool 2. Levin also laid out practical rules for hashtags, including keeping them short and simple and only using two per tweet. An example was using #WakandatheVote and #BlackPanther in a tweet about registering voters who were in line for the Black Panther film. She also reiterated the importance of having a specific goal, targeting decision makers, and having a clear ask in online activism using the Harry Potter Alliance’s efforts of having the franchise’s chocolate frogs made with fair trade chocolate and opposing North Carolina’s anti-trans HB2 “bathroom bill”.

The panel concluded with Levin engaging the audience in their own activism brainstorming session with an audience member discussing the need for more asexual representation in pop culture and comics and using FlameCon as a venue to make a case for this.  This led to a side discussion about the importance of fun in activism and helping keep people engaged in cause from free pizza and T-shirts to crafting GIFs like one of the Dora Milaje from Black Panther metaphorically confronting ICE.

Little Corvus, Yoshi Yoshitani, Aaron Reese, Terry Blas, Jen Bartel, Irene Koh

“Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion!” (Saturday)

“Fan Activists Assemble” was immediately followed by the “Fangirl… But Then Make It Fashion” panel, which was moderated by Geeks Out’s Aaron Reese. The panelists were comic book creators Little Corvus (Deja Brew), Yoshi Yoshitani (Jem and the Holograms), Terry Blas (Dead Weight), Irene Koh (The Legend of Korra), and Jen Bartel (America). After breaking the ice with a fun discussion about favorite candies, Reese started out by asking about the difference between cultural inspiration and appropriation in character outfits. Bartel stressed the importance of “cultural and historical context” in fashion while Koh gave the positive example of the Bangladeshi character she introduced in the Legend of Korra comics as well as time periods where there was “cultural exchange” between European and Asian cultures.

A negative example given by Koh was Queen Amidala’s outfits in Star Wars, which she said were inspired by North Asian and Mongolian fashions and demeaned the original culture. Reese added that Padme had dreadlocks in a deleted scene from Revenge of the Sith, which led to the realization that most of the design and fashion choices in Star Wars are cultural appropriation beginning with the “white guys dressed like ninjas” that Terry Blas used to describe the Jedi Knights. Blas said that unlike Star Wars which exoticizes or “others” its Asian influences, Avatar: The Last Airbender respected Asian cultures even though it wasn’t created by Asians and was superhero stories for people who didn’t have superheroes that looked like them.

The discussion then turned to the popular video game Overwatch where Yoshi Yoshitani criticized the character Doomfist, whose map and character is supposedly inspired by Nigerian culture, but he is half naked, has tusks, and looks like the creators never did research on actual Nigerian fashion. She said that Hanzo and Symmetra had good designs while Irene Koh poked fun at Hanzo’s obsession with honor. Aaron Reese said that the issue with Overwatch was that the game designers focused on environments instead of character looks.

The next topic was body positivity, and Reese gave a shout out to Rose Quartz and the curviness and softness of characters in Steven Universe as well as the strength of Antiope from the Wonder Woman film and the other athletic “hunter/gatherer” Amazon women. His bad example was Psylocke, and a slide showed an example from both the comics and Olivia Munn playing her in X-Men: Apocalypse. Little Corvus made a good point that the difficulty that the panel had thinking of examples was a big problem in pop culture. Terry Blas used the example of his comic Dead Weight about a murder mystery at a fat camp where the characters are drawn as fat in different ways that reflects their character instead of just having the same body shape.

Bartel said that she had done covers for the character Faith from Valiant Comics and liked her as a representative of body positivity, but said that she wished she could redesign her costume into something that the superheroine would actually wear. In connection with this, Blas said that some male comic book artists spend hours of research getting a jet engine part right, but don’t consider fashion in their work. This led to a discussion about female superhero body types with Yoshitani saying that there was pressure on female superheroes to be perfect for everyone. Irene Koh said that she wished superhero artists took inspiration from ESPN: The Body Issue, which shows how different kinds of athletes have different body types.

Other topics discussed by the panel, included gender expression and how this was handled better in anime than in Western comics with Little Corvus making an excellent point about how Mulan could be non-binary as she explores different gender presentations in the 1998 Disney film. Another topic was color washing where Reese and Koh strongly criticized writers who described people of color like food.  The panel ended on a positive note with Reese, Blas, and Little Corvus talking about how the Runaways from the Hulu TV show and America were good representations of teenage fashion and their clothing choices made them seem like they were real people.

This panel reinforced the idea that careful attention to a character’s heritage even through something like a piece of clothing makes for a richer reading or viewing experience, and it also challenged me to look at media that I have taken for granted for instances of cultural appropriation. Star Wars was a big one.

Steve Fox, Chad Sell, Barbara Perez Marquez, Molly Ostertag, Lilah Sturges, James Tynion IV

“Telling All Ages Queer Stories” (Sunday)

The final panel I attended was on Sunday and was about all ages comics created by LGBTQ creators. The panel was moderated by Paste’s Steve Foxe and featured Chad Sell (Cardboard Kingdom), Barbara Perez Marquez (Cardboard Kingdom), Molly Ostertag (Witch Boy), Lilah Sturges (Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass), and James Tynion IV (Justice League Dark)Foxe began by asking what kind of LGBTQ characters whether positive or negative the panelists came across when they were young adults.

Tynion said that he mainly read superhero comics growing up where there wasn’t a lot of LGBTQ representation except for homophobic jokes and said he connected to the X-Men as well as webcomics with gay characters when he was in middle school. Sell said that an issue of Superman from the early 1990s scared him into possibly not coming out when two gay men were chased out of town and then rescued by Superman. The point he got from this story is that if he came out as gay, he would be forced to run away. Sturges’ first experience with a trans character in media was The Crying Game, but she said until Lana Wachowski made her 2012 speech that trans characters were portrayed as either pathetic or deceivers. She said that she enjoyed writing Jo as a happy trans kid in Lumberjanes. Perez Marquez talked about how she didn’t grow up with LGBTQ characters, but did connect with queer coded” characters like Spinelli from Recess.

Foxe’s next question was that in writing stories about LGBT youth that the panelists drew on their own childhood or an idealized one. James Tynion said that his science fiction series The Woods about a school being transported to a different planet drew on his own experiences as an out queer high schooler while his series The Backstagers about theater kids was more idealized. Molly Ostertag said that she wasn’t out as a lesbian in high school, and her upcoming queer high school girl romance was a vision of what she wanted as a teenager. However, she didn’t want to talk down to teens or avoid the realities of homophobia. Lilah Sturges said she felt a moment of doubt writing about the happy romance between Mal and Molly in Lumberjanes, but said she was able to write it because Lumberjanes like their relationship is a true utopian vision. Barbara Perez Marquez’s work on Cardboard Kingdom was more true to her life as a young queer Dominican girl while her webcomic Order of the Belfry was pure wish fulfillment about lady knights who kiss.

The discussion shifted to queer content filtering and pushback about LGBTQ content from editors and publishers. Tynion made a good point about how companies realized there was money in queer audiences and said he got some pushback in his superhero books and relatively none in his all ages comics for BOOM! Ostertag said it was easier to “push the envelope” in regards to LGBTQ content in comics versus television where she rarely interacted with the people who pulled the strings. So, it was much easier for her to explore gender roles in Witch Boy where a boy wants to try girl magic and not boy magic and harder to have a same gender couple holding hands in the background of an animated show. Sell and Perez Marquez talked about the “sneaky” representation of Cardboard Kingdom which are stories geared to 9-12 year olds and don’t have labels, but do explore things like same sex attraction and gender nonconformity.

Then, the panel basically transformed into a pure celebration of LGBTQ YA stories. James Tynion talked about how in Backstagers that he began with subtle representation and then had two of his leads, Jory and Hunter, become boyfriends by the end of the series. Lilah Sturges said that she enjoyed writing a pre-teen trans coming of age story in Lumberjanes because it’s not sexual and is a pure statement about what does it mean to have a gender. She also revealed something adorable that will make fans of the series smile when they read her graphic novel. Chad Sell talked about how he chose writers for The Cardboard Kingdom based on their own personal experiences that they could bring to the “neighborhood” of stories.

The panel ended in Q and A where an audience member asked about how the creators as adults captured the voices of today’s young people in their comics. Barbara Perez Marquez made the excellent suggestion of having kids or teens like in a public library’s graphic novel or anime club to beta read their scripts and give notes on what they liked about the scripts.

Vault Comics Gives Readers Free First Issues of Cult Classic & Songs For The Dead

Vault Comics is giving readers free copies of Cult Classic: Return to Whisper #1 and Songs For The Dead #1 as free digital downloads.

After an internal problem at Diamond Comic Distributors delayed the release of Cult Classic: Return to Whisper #2 and Songs for the Dead #2 by one week, Vault Comics decided to offer digital copies of the first issues for free as a thank you to readers for their patience. Because of the delay, physical copies of both Cult Classic #2 and Songs for the Dead #2 will now hit store shelves on Wednesday, April 25th.

Cult Classic: Return to Whisper is the flagship series in a creator-owned, shared universe of interwoven stories published by Vault Comics beginning in 2018. Created and curated by writer Eliot Rahal, the Cult Classic universe will feature a wide array of today’s hottest new creators, including Jackson Lanzing, Collin Kelly, John Bivens, Leah Williams, Katy Rex, Grace Thomas, Jenna Cha, Tim Daniel, Alejandro Aragon, Marissa Louise, and many more to be announced. Cult Clasic: Return to Whisper is written by Eliot Rahal, drawn by Felipe Cunha, colored by Dee Cunniffe, and lettered by Taylor Esposito, with cover art by Irene Koh.

Songs for The Dead is a cult-hit fantasy comic book series that follows Bethany, a minstrel with a heart full of adventure, a would-be hero determined to find a missing boy from the town of Llyne, and a friend to all woodland critters. But mostly the dead ones. Because Bethany is also a necromancer. Captured by the vile Lord Rolland, Bethany will make an unlikely friend, who is all-too-good at providing more corpses to raise. Songs or The Dead is written by Andrea Fort and Michael Christopher Heron, illustrated by Sam Beck, and letterer Deron Bennett.

Hunters, a New Comic Anthology from Lion Forge

Lion Forge Comics builds on its promise of “Comics for Everyone” with the announcement of Hunters, an all-new fantasy epic told through a diverse cast of today’s top creative talent!

Famed warrior Azarias has gathered a small army of varied adventurers on a quest to gather the dust of a distant island god in order to save the life of their king. Along the way, they encounter numerous beasts and monsters, all in the process of gathering artifacts necessary to locate the island god before ultimately defeating it. Throughout the course of the adventure, the band disperses into small groups with individual objectives in order to cover more ground in shorter order. These individual side-story adventures reveal more about each of the many unique and intriguing characters and their different interactions in different combinations.

This very intricate and original fantasy universe is filled with a large cast of intriguing, complex, and diverse warriors deserving stories of their own, building to the ultimate encounter. While the primary storyline is told by series co-director Josh Tierney and illustrated by Miguel Valderrama, the individual short tales are told by a variety of their celebrated comic-industry peers in different visual styles.

Co-created by Paul Maybury and Josh Tierney, this epic anthology taps Miguel Valderrama, Carlos Valderrama, Afu Chan, Devin Kraft, Niami, Meg Gandy, Jared Morgan, Irene Koh, Kyla Vanderklugt, Benjamin Marra, Alexis Ziritt, Travel Foreman, Carlos Carrasco, Vlad Gusev, and Ramon Sierra for an epic high fantasy tale.

Hunters is published in partnership with Buño Books and is slated for release in June.

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts is Collected in September 2018

Foodies and horror fanatics rejoice! Dark Horse is pleased to reveal that Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts hardcover collection is now available for preorder!

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts features terrifying tales cooked up by the best-selling author and veteran chef, Anthony Bourdain and acclaimed novelist Joel Rose, back again from their New York Times #1 bestseller, Get Jiro!. This collection also contains all-new, original recipes prepared by Bourdain himself, plus a guide to the ghostly legendary spirits behind these horrifying tales.

Inspired by the Japanese Edo Period game Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai or 100 Candles, played by samurai warriors to test their courage, Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts reimagines this classic game of dread and terror as a circle of international chefs invoke modern tales of horror, terrifying yokai, yorei, and obake, all with the common thread of food—and pray that they survive the night.

This horror anthology features art from stellar artists Sebastian Cabrol, Francesco Francavilla, Irene Koh, Leonardo Manco, Alberto Ponticelli, Paul Pope, Vanesa Del Rey, and Mateus Santolouco with fantastic color by Jose Villarrubia, and a drop-dead cover by Paul Pope.

Anthony Bourdain’s Hungry Ghosts goes on sale September 19, 2018.

Cult Classic: Return to Whisper #1 Sells Out, Rushed to Second Print

On the day of release, Cult Classic: Return to Whisper #1 from Vault Comics has sold out at the distributor level, and is being rushed to a second printing to meet high demand.

Cult Classic: Return to Whisper is the flagship series in a creator-owned, shared universe of interwoven stories published by Vault Comics beginning in 2018. Created and curated by writer Eliot Rahal, the Cult Classic universe will feature a wide array of today’s hottest new creators, including Jackson Lanzing, Collin Kelly, John Bivens, Leah Williams, Katy Rex, Grace Thomas, Jenna Cha, Tim Daniel, Alejandro Aragon, Marissa Louise, and many more to be announced.

Cult Clasic: Return to Whisper is written by Eliot Rahal, drawn by Felipe Cunha, colored by Dee Cunniffe, and lettered by Taylor Esposito, with cover art by Irene Koh.

Vault’s Cult Classic: Return of the Graveyard Gang is now Cult Classic: Return to Whisper

Vault Comics has announced their forthcoming series, Cult Classic: Return of the Graveyard Gang, will be re-titled as Cult Classic: Return to Whisper. 

Why the change in title? Cult Classic: Return to Whisper creator Eliot Rahal had this to say:

It’s simple really…The Graveyard Gang was taken! I mean our title was originally a little longer, but there was a web series we were unaware of called “The Graveyard Gang” and both Vault and I decided it’d be best to respect that creator’s work. Comics can be a small place sometimes, and the last thing any of us want to do is create ill will in the community. So here we are with a new title, Cult Classic: Return to Whisper! No muss, no fuss! That’s a thing people say, right? Please let it be a thing people say.

Cult Classic: Return to Whisper is the flagship series in a creator-owned, shared universe of interwoven stories that will published by Vault Comics beginning in 2018. Created and curated by writer Eliot Rahal, the Cult Classic universe will feature a wide array of today’s hottest new creators.

Cult Classic: Return to Whisper is written by Eliot Rahal, drawn by Felipe Cunha, colored by Dee Cunniffe, and lettered by Taylor Esposito, with cover art by Irene Koh. It will be in stores for only $1.99 on February 28th, 2018.

Preview: Another Castle #1

ANOTHER CASTLE #1

(W) Andrew Wheeler
(A/C/CA) Paulina Ganucheau
Retailer incentive variant cover illustrated by Irene Koh
Price: $3.99
Age Range: 8 and up
Genre: Fantasy

Princess Misty of Beldora longs for a more exciting life, but gets more than she bargained for when she is captured by Lord Badlug, the ruler of the neighboring kingdom of Grimoire. He intends to marry her and conquer Beldora, leading the land into ruin and chaos. Together with the long-suffering citizens of Grimoire and a certain bumbling prince, Misty must fight to protect her kingdom and free both realms from Badlug’s tyrannical rule.

ACASTLE-#1-MARKETING_preview-1

Dark Horse to Publish The Secret Loves of Geek Girls

Dark Horse Comics has announced plans to publish the highly anticipated anthology The Secret Loves of Geek Girls. Editor Hope Nicholson has assembled a dazzling mix of prose, comics, and illustrated stories about love, dating, and sex featuring more than fifty creators, including Booker Award–winning novelist Margaret Atwood, Mariko Tamaki, Trina Robbins, Gisèle Lagacé, Marguerite Bennett, Marjorie Liu, and Carla Speed McNeil. It also features a foreword by Kelly Sue DeConnick and a new cover by Noelle Stevenson.

The anthology was originally funded through Kickstarter and will be published through Dark Horse in October 2016.

The Secret Loves of Geek Girls includes:

  • Cartoons by award-winning novelist Margaret Atwood that detail her personal experiences as a young woman
  • A comic by Fionna Adams and Jen Vaughn about what it’s like being a trans woman trying to figure out romantic and sexual inclinations while entrenched in comics
  • A story by Mariko Tamaki and Fiona Smyth in which a seventeen-year-old Tamaki dreams of being Montreal’s first chubby Asian Frank N. Furter
  • A story by Marguerite Bennett about fandom and how it allows us to say what we feel to our loved ones
  • New comics by Meaghan Carter, Megan Kearney, ALB, Meags Fitzgerald, Gillian G., Diana Nock, Roberta Gregory, Laura Neubert, Sarah Winifred Searle, Natalie Smith, Jenn Woodall, and Irene Koh
  • Illustrated stories by Janet Hetherington, Sam Maggs and Selena Goulding, Megan Lavey-Heaton and Isabelle Melançon, Cherelle Ann Sarah Higgins and Rachael Wells, Annie Mok, and Stephanie Cooke and Deena Pagliarello
  • Prose stories by Brandy Dawley, Diana McCallum, Jen Aprahamian, Katie West, Adrienne Kress, Soha Kareem, Loretta Jean, J. M. Frey, Trina Robbins, Twiggy Tallant, Hope Nicholson, Crystal Skillman, Emma Woolley, Gita Jackson, Natalie Zina Walschots, Alicia Contestabile, Tini Howard, Cara Ellison, Jessica Oliver Proulx, and Erin Cossar

SLGG CVR SOL 4x6

Review: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Casey & April TPB

Layout 1As a child of the 80s, I remembered the first time I became aware of who the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were. I can recall, one of my friends at school, was talking how cool they were, and how the show was not only funny but had ninjas and mutants and was set in New York. At this time, the only cartoon that pretty much me , my friends and my cousins could talk about was Ghostbusters and SilverHawks, and could not see any other cartoon taking my attention away from those two. I was never as wrong about anything up to that point, as I immediately got immersed in this cartoon, and became a disciple soon after.

I eventually watched every single episode of the original series and watched all the movies, and yes even the Michael Bay, which left much to be desired. I eventually wanted more than what the TV show gave, and got into the original comics that inspired the TV series in the first place. I found out what most comic book fans find out about their heroes, which their stories are better told in panels. I found Eastman’s and Laird’s stories to not only be engrossing but much funnier, and have much more of an adult sensibility that the cartoons did not have.

The comics’ journey to this point has been an interesting one, as the folks are not only staying faithful to the mythology but are expanding its canon by leaps and bounds. Most of the stories center the fearsome foursome, on their many journeys and battles with Shredder and his Foot Soldiers. I always wondered how the story would play out with any of the supporting characters like Splinter, or Casey or especially April. This miniseries by Mariko Tamaki and Irene Koh, is another entry into the canon, and definitely not a filler story, as this is a story which finds Casey and April go on a journey to find the Pantheon, which is the genesis to how the Turtles and Splinter became who they are but also some of Shredder’s soldiers Like Bebop and Rocksteady. By story’s end, the reader has not only found out more about the TMNT’s mythology but also about Casey and April.

Overall, a solids miniseries, which has definitely renewed my interest in these characters in so many ways, even had me digging for some of my old comics. The story by Tamaki, shows how much of a master storyteller she is, as she definitely proves that she is a fan of the source material. The art by Koh, is suspenseful and beautiful, and shows these characters in lights and shades which has never been shown before. Altogether, a magnificently told and drawn story that should not only make fans of the TMNT and their universe but also of these excellent creators.

Story: Mariko Tamaki Artist: Irene Koh
Story:  9 Art: 9 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Stela: Comics for your Phone

There’s been a lot of recent news about digital comics, and one of the more interesting (and unexpected) is the announcement of the launch of a new mobile comics platform in 2016.

Stela is the “premiere mobile comics platform” designed from the ground up with original content by award-winning writers and illustrators. Whether at home or on the go, Stela is the only app that delivers comics designed and optimized for your smartphone, all in the palm of your hand with new content every weekday.

The Stela library includes work from acclaimed creators including Evan Dorkin, Sarah Dyer, Joe Casey, Irene Koh, Brian Wood, Ron Wimberly, Stuart Moore, and many more.

The app promises new content every day optimized for the mobile platform. More interesting, the app also mentions the focus on community whether it’s interacting with authors, illustrators, or fellow readers. You’ll be able to post your reactions and comments in real-time, and discuss the latest chapters in the Stela library.

This is one to watch for in 2016.

Stela

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