Tag Archives: idw

Underrated: Comics Not In Diamond’s Top 100 For June ’19

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Comics not in Diamond’s top 400 sellers for June 2019


This week we’re going to be looking at a list of comics that are all pretty good, but don’t get the attention that they deserve. Now I’m not even going to pretend to have a definitively exhaustive list of underrated comics here, because we’re hoping  that you decide to check at least one of these series out next time you’re looking for something new either online or at your LCS, and giving you a huge list to check out would be counter productive to that. Instead, you’ll find four to six comics that are worth your attention that failed to crack the top 100 in sales. The only hard stipulation for this week: not one of the comics made it into the top 400 (yeah, I went for books that hardly any of you have read for whatever reason) for this month’s comic sales, according to Comichron, which is why they’re Underrated.


Banjax #1 (Action Lab)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 319/2,730
Why You Should Read It:
A story about a hero who hit rock bottom, struggling with addiction and falling out of favour after a very brutal public murder, who has recently been diagnosed with a cancer caused by the use of his powers. So what does a fallen hero with nothing to lose do when faced with a very finite time left on this world? He decides to go out in a blaze of glory.

Beasts Of Burden: Presence of Others #2 (Dark Horse)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 264/4,276
Why You Should Read It: 
The second part of a two part story that helps flesh out one of the most charmingly disturbing worlds; Evan Dorkin’s story about the animals of Burden Hill and the surprising supernatural adventures they get involved in to keep their corner of the world just a little safer. A comic from this series is always a highlight of my week

The Life And Death Of Toyo Harada #4 (Valiant)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 250/4,850
Why You Should Read It: 
A character who can easily be seen as either hero or villain depending on whose story you’re reading, Joshua Dysart’s current Valiant project pulls to a close the writer’s time with the Harbinger villain as we witness his fall from power. I truly think this is a masterpiece in waiting.

TMNT: Urban Legends #14 (IDW)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 241/5,404
Why You Should Read It:
I often feel that IDW’s TMNT comics are often written off as kids stories. While some are targeted to a younger audience, I’ve yet to read one that I didn’t enjoy. Give ’em a chance when you next see one on the racks.

Punk Mambo #3 (Valiant)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 219/6,304
Why You Should Read It:
A snarky British magic practitioner, Punk Mambo has been pulled into a world she doesn’t really care about in order to help save the Voodoo gods. She’s more pissed because the villain stole something from her, and makes no secret of her disdain for the old ways. Think Constantine, but angrier.

The Crow: Hack Slash #1 (IDW)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 199/8,163
Why You Should Read It:
As a huge fan of The Crow, I’m usually the first in line to grab any new story set in O’Barr’s universe, and this is an enjoyable entry point. It may not be the best comic in your pile this week, but I enjoyed the hell out of it.

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Unless the comics industry ceases any and all publication look for a future installment of Underrated to cover more comics that aren’t cracking the top 100.

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 6/29

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Batman: Damned #3 (DC/Black Label)** – Remember this thing? Well, it’s back, just in time to finally end. Brian Azzarello puts forth minimal “effort” on the script, Lee Bermejo busts his ass on the art, and the end result is some seriously middling stuff. They probably should have just released it as a wordless art portfolio, as the dialogue and captions just clutter up the grim-but-beautiful pictures. Overall: 5 Recommendation: Give it a look, but not a read. 

Detective Comics #1006 (DC)** – Another one that would have been better served released sans script, as Peter Tomasi’s Batman/Spectre team-up is an absolutely unreadable mess, but Kyle Hotz just plain kills it on the art. What’s with the Bat-books this week, anyway? Same story as far as the scoring goes for this one. Overall: 4 Recommendation: Give it a look, but not a read

Major X #6 (Marvel) **– The big draw for this final issue is Rob Liefeld returning to handle the art as well as the scripting duties. And, of course, that’s the big problem, as well. A comic that’s exactly what you think it is. Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass

X-Men Grand Design: X-Tinction #2 (Marvel) **– This, too, is exactly what you think it is — only in this case that means it’s absolutely great. Sorry to see Ed Piskor’s “X-history” come to an end, but what a breathtakingly refreshing take on it all this series has been. Marvel needs to give this guy another grand-scale project ASAP. Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

X Men Grand Design: Xtinction #2 ( Marvel) – Ed Piskor is at it again with the second issue of this monumental book, giving readers snapshots from the X-men’s vast history. As I am fan of his, and what he is doing in this book, I wholeheartedly recommend this book. Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars Age of Rebellion: Darth Vader #1 (Marvel) – In probably the most interesting story from this series, we finally get a solo Darth Vader story. As Vader finds his way, a power hungry Governor tries to show him up in front of the Emperor. As he gets sent on a few missions where if it was not the villain we know, he would have been killed by now. By issue’s end, he gets rid of a threat and the Governor and ultimately gaining favor with The Emperor once again. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Logan

Marilyn Manor #1 (IDW/Black Crown)– Marilyn Manor #1 is a high concept comic about the First Daughter throwing a New Wave rager in the White House while her parents are gone. Magdalene Visaggio writes the protagonist Marilyn as a little bit insufferable and a little bit of a rebel hero while Marley Zarcone nails the period fashions and nooks and crannies of the White House. Irma Kniivila’s flat colors fit the tone of story too, and there’s a really expensive 1980s music video vibe to some of the ways the panels are staged like when Marilyn is laying in JFK and her namesake Marilyn Monroe’s old love nest. Marilyn Manor has a lot of energy and a fun tone, but the first issue lacks a real hook for the rest of the series beyond the party and some supernatural stuff. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

Wolverine Exit Wounds #1 (Marvel) Three legendary Wolverine creators, Larry Hama, Chris Claremont, and Sam Kieth, return to tell stories about him with the help of artists Scot Eaton and Salvador Larroca. Hama and Eaton’s story, which is set in the Weapon X days, is the most long winded and least memorable as Dr. Cornelius triggers Wolverine’s past memories to make him kill a bear without remorse. The story is an okay dark Wolverine yarn, but Eaton is unfortunately no Barry Windsor-Smith. In the second story, Claremont and Larroca, who is sporting a looser and less stiff art style, check in with Wolverine and Kitty Pryde in Japan as he protects the secrets of ramen recipe from some gangsters. The story is fun because you get to see Wolverine make ramen even if the “twist” at the end is a bit of head scratcher. It’s nice to see Wolverine settle back into his classic role as ronin even if Kitty Pryde is annoying as hell. The final story is the best one as Kieth writes and draws a simple one on one battle between Wolverine and Venom. There’s violence, wacky proportions, and the fight is choreographed like a dance. Kieth even gets to use his painted style in one of the best depictions of Wolverine’s berserker rage. Overall: 7.3 Verdict: Read


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 6/22

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Logan

Glow #2 (IDW)– I wish to bestow this book with the highest compliment you can give a licensed comic: I wish it was a plotline on the Glow TV show. Tini Howard and Hannah Templer pit the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling against La Prima, who are wrestlers being wrestlers, not actors being wrestlers. This issue is full of attempts at bonding with their opponents as Ruth wants to prove that they’re legit. The best character beat is Carmen sharing a sweet moment and some power bomb lessons with Desdemona, who is from a family of luchadors and is someone she can relate to. As far as visuals, Templer hits that sweet spot between capturing characters likenesses and being expressive for dramatic or (mostly) comedy purposes. Howard has a fantastic handle on all these women’s voices, and this comic is the perfect thing to tide fans over who are waiting for Glow Season 3 as well as a swan song to their Southern California days. Overall: 8.8 Verdict: Buy

Superman Year One #1 (DC/Black Label)– Woo, the discourse has been spicy about Superman Year One, but Frank Miller’s poetic inner monologue nails Clark’s adolescent discomfort with his abilities and status as an alien on Earth. I got a press copy of the comic, but actually want to pony up the dough to get a physical copy because I want to see how John Romita Jr’s wide open panels and muscular poses look in the prestige format.Also, Clark joining the navy is a smart bit of revisionism because to many young people in rural areas, the military seems to be the best way to escape their small towns and see the world. I might be reading too much into it, but it’s clever foreshadowing at Superman’s future role as a weapon of war/Reagan stooge in Dark Knight Returns. (I would love to see Miller/Romita’s take on Superman and Batman’s 1st meeting.) Rating: 9.0 Overall Verdict: Buy

Excellence #2 (Image)– Brandon Thomas and Khary Randolph craft an intoxicating world of magic, consequences, legacy, and daddy issues in Excellence #2. The protagonist, Spencer, has just come into his own as a magic user and earned a rare hug from his dad when his grandmother becomes ill, and there’s nothing he can do. Or is there. Excellence is a comic about breaking boundaries and hierarchies, and the connection between magic and emotion. It perfectly fits Randolph’s high energy art style and Emilio Lopez’s crescendo of colors. I really felt for Spencer throughout this comic as his main fear isn’t losing his powers, but his father’s disapproval. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Elana

Glow #2 (IDW) Can’t wait for more of the humor, warmth, wild 80s wrestling aesthetics and believable women’s community of the Netflix show GLOW? This comic is absolutely for us! Writer Tini Howard perfectly channels the voice of each character in the show. It’s truly uncanny. Is she in the writers room? Can she be? Artist Hannah Templer has a lively style and her take on the costumes and clothes is exuberant, fun and 80s as hell. This month’s issue focuses on Carmen and gives her a chance to succeed in a space where the other women are fumbling. It’s gratifying and fun.
Recommendation: Must read! 

Ryan C

Superman: Year One #1 (DC)** – As bad as you’ve heard. Maybe even worse. Is it okay to hope this version of Clark Kent gets killed in combat when he joins the navy? Also, “Year One”? Huh? This issue alone covers like 18 years of his life. I’m done talking about — hell, even thinking about — this thing. Overall: 0 Recommendation: Pass. I purchased my copy. That was a stupid idea.

American Carnage #8 (DC/Vertigo)** – This series has been great, and with just one issue left, Bryan Hill and Leandro Fernandez are setting the stage for a barn-burner of a conclusion. If you’ve been passing on this in singles, get the trade — and if Vertigo’s going out, as rumored, at least it’s going out with a bang. Not that anyone’s really paying attention. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Clue: Candlestick #3 (IDW)** – Dash Shaw is doing more just-plain clever and inventive stuff with this modest three-parter than mainstream comics have seen in forever. Superb cartooning that I dearly hope gets more folks to pay attention to his small-press work. This guy is the real deal. Overall: 10. Recommendation: Buy

Batman #73 (DC)** – Mikel Janin delivers some astonishing art here, particularly with a double-page spread that’ll knock your socks off. Tom King mails in a lazy script that wastes a rather intriguing “Batman and his dad in the desert” premise. You know the drill by now. Overall: 5 Recommendation: Look at it, then put it back on the comic store shelf.


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Underrated: Comics Not In Diamond’s Top 400 For May ’19

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Comics not in Diamond’s top 400 sellers for May 2019


This week we’re going to be looking at a list of comics that are all pretty good, but don’t get the attention that they deserve. Now I’m not even going to pretend to have a definitively exhaustive list of underrated comics here, because we’re hoping  that you decide to check at least one of these series out next time you’re looking for something new either online or at your LCS, and giving you a huge list to check out would be counter productive to that. Instead, you’ll find four to six comics that are worth your attention that failed to crack the top 100 in sales. The only hard stipulation for this week: not one of the comics made it into the top 400 (yeah, I went for books that hardly any of you have read for whatever reason) for this month’s comic sales, according to Comichron, which is why they’re Underrated.


Voracious: Appetite For Destruction #1 (Action Lab)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 509/1,194
Why You Should Read It:
The beginning of the end for one of my favourite stories, this comic features a time travelling dinosaur hunting chef, a dinosaur detective and a giant monster. The series has evolved over time to cross genre boundaries and blend them into one great melting pot of awesomeness.

Britannia: Dollar Debut #1 (Valiant)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 441/1,698
Why You Should Read It: 
Because for a dollar, you really can’t go wrong with this Roman era detective story that’s packed full of insanely detailed action and imagery.

Grumble #6 (Albatross Funnybooks)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 430/1,810
Why You Should Read It: 
Another criminally under read series on this list, Grumble is easily one of my favourite comics being published at the moment (and another one is the first on this list). The art is vibrant and beautiful, and the story has a surprisingly dark undertone beneath the good feelings that you’ll get in your stomach watching the characters connect.

From Hell: Master Edition #5 (IDW)
Sales Rank/Units Sold: 406/2,163
Why You Should Read It:
If you have never read Alan Moore’s From Hell, then you should. These Master Editions are a great way for you to do that without splurging on the huge trade (and they’re much easier to hold). This is a great book set around the times of Jack the Ripper, and another reason Alan Moore has the reputation for greatness that he does.

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Unless the comics industry ceases any and all publication look for a future installment of Underrated to cover more comics that aren’t cracking the top 100.

Review: Eve Stranger #1

Eve Stranger #1

The premise of David Barnett, Philip Bond, and Eva de la Cruz’s Eve Stranger #1 is basically “What if Jason Bourne was a girl with blue hair?” There’s also a little bit of Luc Besson’s “tiny girl assassin with one name kicks ass” in its DNA. This first issue follows the amnesiac Eve as she goes forward with her first “mission” that involves traveling to hotels, saving kids from human traffickers, and lots of sad, but cute childhood flashbacks. With occasional digressions to show how Eve’s blood is basically a commodity, Barnett keeps the plotting linear, yet mysterious like Eve Stranger’s past. And it’s all contradicted by his and Liz Prince’s backup story, which seems like a joke/cheeky political satire, but is it?

The real highlight of Eve Stranger #1 is Philip Bond’s artwork complemented by bright pops of blue and yellow from Eva de la Cruz to add intrigue and action to the hum drum of modern living. Bond worked on Deadline in the 1990s with Jamie Hewlett of Tank Girl and Gorillaz and collaborated on Grant Morrison classics like Kill Your Boyfriend and Invisibles. His style is a hybrid between the smooth lines of Frank Quitely and Hewlett’s cartoon anarchy. It works well for a slick spy caper with just the hint of attitude as Eve isn’t a monosyllabic Bourne or Terminator and beams with glee when she buys yet another Rolls Royce motorcycle.

Bond has a real gift for crafting cool action moments like when Eve kicks the room service attendant right in the tray after lazing in bed for the previous few pages or the bit of gunplay that goes down later in the issue. But he and David Barnett don’t skimp on the emotion creating a connection between Eve and her real (?) dad that continues throughout the comic. Any time, Eve sees a child, there is a flashback to her childhood with her dad and a group of kids that were probably trained to be assassins too. It’s a quick visual reminder that Eve is a teenager and not just a weapon, and the use of Herge Tintin eyes on the kid characters allows for the reader to identify with them..

And the teenage part especially shines in Barnett and Prince’s backup story to Eve Stranger #1 whose ending leads into the beginning of the issue and gets a wee bit meta with references to other Black Crown stories. It’s a sweet story about Eve as a girl reporter, who because she can only observe events and can’t interfere, has to wait for sexy shirtless fireman to rescue her elderly neighbor’s cat. Prince has a cute, humorous art style with big gestures and faces that lulls you into a false sense of security while Barnett makes the connection to the main story.

Eve Stranger #1’s story is a tad derivative of the action movies that I mentioned in the first paragraph, but David Barnett and Philip Bond seem to be just as concerned with their protagonist’s emotion and quest for autonomy as showing her doing cool things. Plus the art and colors are stylish, distinct, and the opposite of house style, which has been one of the strengths of the Black Crown imprint as a whole.

Story: David Barnett Art: Philip Bond
Colors: Eva de la Cruz Letters: Jane Heir
Backup Art: Liz Prince
Story:7 Art: 9 Overall: 7.7 Recommendation: Read

IDW/Black Crown provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 4/27

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ryan C

Detective Comics #1002 (DC)** – I don’t have much good to say about Tom King’s “Batman,” but right now this book might even be worse. Bard Walker’s art is nice, but Peter Tomasi’s script is so uninspired that the big “villain takes his helmet off to reveal his true identity” cliffhanger is just completely flat.If you don’t care what happens on the first 20-ish pages, you won’t care what happens on the last one, either. Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass


Freedom Fighters #5 (DC)** – Thank goodness for Eddy Barrows’ art, because Robert Venditti’s scripting on this book is just lazy as stupid. Uncle Sam is back and he gets in some fights but he’s weak — and the cliffhanger is a re-introduction of a villain introduced earlier in the same issue. It’s like he’s not even trying. Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass


 Dial H For Hero #2 (DC/Wonder Comics)** – This book’s been fun so far, if nothing amazing. Sam Humphries has a nice handle on his principal characters, if not the premise of the “H Dial” itself, and Joe Quinones elevates the proceedings with his fluid, crisp art that he employs — successfully — to “ape” several different styles. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read


Books Of Magic #7 (DV/Vertigo)** – After an uptick for a couple of issues, writer Kat Howard is just going through the motions here again, the whole installment being an extended set-up for re-introducing Titania, Queen of Faerie. Tom Fowler draws her well — hell, he draws everything well — but this was just a paper-thin issue in terms of story. Overall: 3 Recommendation: Pass

Logan

Thanos #1 (Marvel)– Tini Howard and a rejuvenated Ariel Olivetti tell the story of how Thanos met Gamora just in time for Avengers Endgame. Howard switches from POV to POV when writing about the Mad Titan showing doubts about his purpose to court Lady Death while his Butcher Squadron begins to suspect something is up when members of their team end up missing. She and Olivetti also set up a nice rivalry between Thanos and Magus aka Adam Warlock, whose church matches up against Thanos and his army of killers and pirates. It’s the macro-threat while it looks like the series will mainly focus on Thanos and Gamora’s relationship. Ariel Olivetti’s art is a real find in this series as he’s dropped his usual painted style for something looser, yet with the same level of detail on ships and tech. Overall: 8. Recommendation: Buy

Dick Tracy Forever #1 (IDW)– Writer/artist Michael Oeming is the perfect fit for comic strip hero Dick Tracy with his square jaw, Art Deco cityscapes, and pulpy dialogue.Dick Tracy Forever #1 has three stories (Plus fun activities like an old school comic), two one and dones and one serialized one. The first one is an ode to silent film, especially Chaplin, the second one pays homage to radio serials, and the third one furthers the plot, I guess. But Dick Tracy Forever isn’t a total nostalgia-fest as Oeming satirizes the law and order detective’s inability to stop systemic crime and corruption that can’t be stopped with a right hook, tommy gun, or some space age gadget. Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

War Of the Realms: Uncanny X-men #1(Marvel)- As Malekith has raised cane in the Nine Realms, with adversity at every corner. As he enters the 10th realm, he unfortunately has to deal with what’s left of the X-men. As Cyclops assemble a formidable team to battle Malekith’s army. By issue’s end, what no one saw coming is [redacted]’s entry into the story. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge #1 (Marvel)– Being this is the first comic book that I read which is used to promote a theme park, I assumed it would be subpar. I was glad to be wrong, as the book unfolds with Han and Chewie setto go to a certain outpost for a job, one that Chewie already senses as trouble. Soon after they get there, their potential employer seemingly has set them up,as we find out about Han’s aversion to Sarlacs. By issue’s end, Chewie’s predilections are more than true, setting the scene for thr entrance of a character from one of the most hotly debated points of contention in the Star Wars mythology. Overall: 9.4 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 1/26

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Joe Hesh

Superman #7 (DC) This is a week late but flu and such is life. This tale comes to you by the hyperbole filled mind of Brian Michael Bendis and the power pencil of Ivan Reis. The book opens with a returned from space Jon Kent and Clark clutching his sontight in mid air over Metropolis. It’s a touching scene and any father who missed his kid can identify. I love moments like this where Superman is shown his humanity. However Jon has come back aged several years and begins to tell his story. Here we hear about Lois, Jon and Jor-El and their time in the cosmos. It was pretty cool to see Lois in a Superman suit and it was beautifully rendered by Ivan Reis. They go to a near by planet and while they are walking Lois is revered as royalty because of her marriage to Kal El. Its a pretty slow issue and not too much but it is the set up for the big story to come. We get a quick pass through with Lobo encountering Jon and it is entertaining. The rest is just Jon filling in the blanks for his folks as the next task is they need to stop Grampa Jor-El as everything depends on it. Like i said the issue was pretty light but it was still enjoyable in parts. Overall: a quick pitstop on the next adventure but still well done. Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

Logan

Crypt of Shadows #1 (Marvel)– Al Ewing and artists Garry Brown, Stephen Green, and Djibril Morrissette-Pham revive Marvel’s classic horror tradition in a pretty messed up one-shot about man, who has a phobia of dogs, marriage problems, and his therapist isn’t super helpful. They successfully turn some of the world’s cutest creatures into bloodthirsty hellhounds beginning with the first page, a ferocious nine panel grid of dogs with teeth bared. These images continue as the protagonist (almost) literally digs a hole for himself, and the comic’s best scenes happen at the titular crypt. Crypt of Shadows is more nostalgic and less groundbreaking, but is an excellent bit of psychological horror with a fucked up twist that should really be a monthly title. Overall: 8.5 Verdict: Buy

Blossoms: 666 #1 (Archie) Jason and Cheryl Blossom join the Archie Horror family as initiates of a Satanic cult in Blossoms: 666 #1. Laura Braga’s depiction of Cheryl exudes evil as she seduces the timid Dilton and tries to get him to act more confidently and stand up for himself. But she’s really using him. Jason’s scheme is not so memorable, and Cullen Bunn and Braga’s comic doesn’t have the immediate hook of Vampironica or Jughead: The Hunger. However, Braga does a nice job showing the contrast in space between the crowded, mundane halls of Riverdale High and the wide, mysterious environs of the Blossoms’ mansion. It’s a cool setting, and Cheryl shines visually and personality-wise, but it’s just a standard Archie comic with hoods and pentagrams in the end. Overall: 7 Verdict: Read

Shazam #2 (DC) Marco Santucci’s art is pretty generic house style stuff, but Geoff Johns does an excellent job creating a new story for the Shazam Family in a modern setting while expanding Shazam’s lore like he did with Green Lantern and Aquaman. In this issue, the Shazam family take a magical subway ride to Funlands, which is the border between super fun and super creepy. There’s an ease to the interactions between the family and stealthily this is a team, not a solo book. And Johns and Santucci don’t skimp on the bad guys either and slowly reintroduce one of the best classic Captain Marvel villains and connect him to the new lore. There are lots of plates spinning plot-wise and the art doesn’t stand out, but Shazam #2 is magical family fun for the most part. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

Ryan C

Batman #63 (DC)** – Always nice to see Mikel Janin back on art, but Tom King’s scripting is still falling flat, especially in this “Batman’s worst nightmares come to life” arc. Plus, what is it with his obsession with killing or otherwise destroying the women that his protagonists love, in this case repeatedly? Something’s not right there, and it’s becoming a very problematic pattern in King’s work. Overall: 2 Recommendation: Pass

Freedom Fighters #2 (DC)** – I must be a glutton for punishment, because the first issue of this 12-parter was embarrassingly bad, yet here I am, back for one more round. And you know what? It’s no better, and may even be worse. Problem number one is that the cover features a battle from LAST issue, not THIS one, and problem two is — everything else. Nothing much happens in Robert Venditti’s script apart from one long fight that sees the new Freedom Fighters beat a giant Nazi police robot, and we get to witness the sudden potential rebirth of Uncle Sam, who apparently resides in the Alan Moore-esque “extradimensional realm of ideas.” Where the fuck did that come from? A lame cliffhanger rounds out another “Razzie”-level comic, but at least Eddy Barrows and Eber Ferreira turn in art that’s up to their usual high standard here. That’s worth a point right there, but that’s it. Overall: 1 Recommendation: Pass. I purchased my copy, which was a really stupid mistake.

The Wild Storm #19 (DC/WildStorm)** – Really nice to see this series back after a bit of a hiatus, and it’s back with a bang — yeah, Warren Ellis’ script is something of an “info-dump,” but it’s a gripping and intriguing one that finally fills in so many of the blanks with just five issues to go. Jon Davis-Hunt turns in his best art to date, which is high praise indeed (there’s a double-page spread early on that will positively knock your socks off), and all in all everything is really ramping up for a memorable “third act.” Not to be missed under any circumstances! Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

American Carnage #3 (DC/Vertigo)** – A high-octane installment in this promising new title that sees writer Bryan Hill, artist Leandro Fernandez, and colorist Dean White all running like a finely-tuned machine, as the momentum of the script kicks up a notch without sacrificing on the action, the illustration ups the ante on dynamic fluidity, and the colors — well, they’re just plain spectacular. This is a fun, reasonably thought-provoking series that seems to be hitting a nice stride very early in what will hopefully be a nice, lengthy run. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

War Is Hell #1 (Marvel) In a return to the old War Comics the House of Ideas became famous for, thus one shot serves fans a book that suffice this comic book fan. in the first story ” Swing Verboten”, Howard Chaykin gives us a story about a Jazz loving Nazi pilot whose love for the music outweighs his patriotism to Nazi Germany. In ” War Devil”, we get a touch of the supernatural as an evil spirit inhabits different people only to survive another day. Overall, a great book that evokes those old comics like The Nam, but with a modern update. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Joe Ryan

Guardians of the Galaxy #1 (Marvel) – I have been hyped for this since Cates/Shaw were announced as the creative team. It’s the God Country team for crying out loud! One of the best series in the last few years, and Cates does wild and fun better than most anyone. This issue didn’t disappoint. It wasn’t the greatest thing ever, but it didn’t have to be. It was an awesome action packed wild ride with Beta Ray Bill, Cosmic Ghost Rider and Silver Surfer all hanging out, I mean what more does one need!? This book is only going to get better. Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Crypt of Shadows #1 (Marvel) – I have been going off about Al Ewing ever since he started his run on Immortal Hulk, and loved him back on Ultimates as well. He has been underrated for too long, but not any longer. Between this and Hulk, he has shown he is a master at writing classic horror. We get different artists teaming up with Ewing for a classic horror tale that felt straight out of the old horror comics Marvel themselves produced. This was absolutely a great representation of Marvel’s 80 years!. Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Batman #63 (DC) – I loved seeing Constantine walk into King’s world, and after we get more answers as to what is happening in this issue, I may change my score. I enjoyed the issue, and have been pleasantly surprised at these “filler” issues, which feel like they aren’t filler at all, while Williamson prepares to take over and we resume the “main” story a few issues later. Janin kills it on art as usual, and overall this was a decent entry and added a bunch of mystery to the series. King does have an odd thing for imagining bumping off his heroes significant others between this and Superman #7 Giant size though. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Buy

Naomi #1 (Wonder Comics) – The opening spread of Superman vs. Mongul drawn by Campbell is jaw dropping. I love his layouts and panel work on this book. It’s creative, and so is this story. It was fun to step into the perspective of a young girl who keeps missing the most famous hero save the day in her small town where nothing happens. The end gives us a nice cliffhanger and a fun ending to a good first issue. I loved the optimism in this comic, and it was a nice change of pace. Walker was made for this book. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

War is Hell #1 (Marvel) – We get two stories in this nod to Marvel’s 80 years, and an nod to the old war comics that share the same name. The first by Chaykin was interesting, and gave another perspective to WW2 and a fan of jazz, while Phillip KennedyJohnson and Alberqueue give us a prose driven dark tale in Afghanistan that fits the title of this book. I did enjoy the book for the most part, and it was a solid one shot. Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Mini Reviews For The Week Ending 1/19

Sometimes, the staff at Graphic Policy read more comics than we’re able to get reviewed. When that happens you’ll see a weekly feature compiling short reviews from the staff of the comics, or graphic novels, we just didn’t get a chance to write a full review for.

These are Graphic Policy’s Mini Reviews.


Ashley

Euthanauts #5 (IDW/Black Crown) – The first arc of Tini Howard and Nick Robles’ series on death and the afterlife has ended and I hope it isn’t the last. With Circe dead, our intrepid heroes struggle to find the answers to why. With a final broadcast from Mercy, the issue takes us through an exhilarating ride though Deathspace to tie up loose ends while also setting up for potential later issues. By the time I was finished with the issue, I immediately went and preordered the trade because I am not ready for this series to end. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Die #2 (Image) – Since I never got into D&D, I never expected to be so into a comic that plays so heavily with the lore. But Kieron Gillen and Stephanie Hans pulled it off that I’m am completely engrossed in the comic and mad about it. Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Captain Marvel #1 (Marvel) – New Year, New Movie, so that means New Comic for Carol Danvers. Which, as it turns out, is super fun! The comic features Carol Danvers returning to the Avengers full time after nearly two years in space and time away to take care of her brother in The Life of Captain Marvel. Most of the issue shows Carol adjusting to life back in New York and juggling a million different balls. Suddenly, the issue takes a turn and leaves a hell of a hook for future issues. Kelly Thompson’s writing is quick witted and sassy, making her the perfect successor to Deconnick and Stohl, and Carmen Carnero and Tamra Bonvillain are probably the best art team for Carol since Kris Anka and Matt Wilson. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy

The Wicked + The Divine #41 (Image) – So much of everything since issue #5 has been building up to this issue. With as much shocks and heartbreaks the series has had over the years, having an issue that has this much payoff is practically euphoric. Along with being masterfully written by Gillen per usual, McKelvie’s art plays the emotions of the scenes with such subtlety and grace. There were panels in this issue that made me tear up with facial expressions alone. Overall, this was one of the most satisfying issues of WicDiv so far. Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Ryan C

Days Of Hate #12 (Image)** – Ales Kot and Danijel Zezelj close out their year-long series with another installment that continues the downward trajectory this thing has been on from issue two onwards. More an epilogue than a conclusion, Kot here uses some admittedly effective emotional “beats” to less-than-cleverly disguise that he hasn’t actually wrapped up a damn thing. Gorgeous art from Zezelj, as always, but this entire series was a complete waste of time and money. Overall: 2 Recommendation: PassR

Gideon Falls #10 (Image)** – Moving in exactly the opposite direction, Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino continue the upward trajectory that they’ve been on from issue two onwards with their most visually and conceptually stunning issue yet, one which sees the two competing plotlines finally converge in a very literal, and memorable, sense. This is a book that just keeps on getting more coherent and more confident month after month. Overall: 9 Recommendation: Buy


Evolution #13 (Image/Skybound)** – The second-best horror series at Image begins its final arc with a pretty breakneck piece of convergence/dovetailing of its own as the threat, and the action, begins to center firmly in the Los Angeles area. Joe Infurnari’s Eurocomics-style art continues to be absolutely breathtaking, and the small army of writers — James Asmus, Christopher Sebela, and Jospeh Keatinge — produce yet another script that feels so seamless it could fool you into thinking it was written by one person. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Deadly Class #36 (Image/Giant Generator) **– Rick Remender and Wes Craig revive their series after a long hiatus on the very same day the TV show premieres (just a coincidence, I’m sure) with a very “new-reader-friendly” issue that sees Marcus struggle with his internal demons and plot a bold course forward. Lots here for veterans and newbies alike to enjoy, and the art in this book has seriously never been better. Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Shean

Star Wars Age Of Republic Special #1(Marvel)-In a trio of short stories, we find some popular side characters take the forefront. In one tale, we find Mace Windu taken but it is his first lesson as a Padawan which enables him to best captors. In the second tale, Asajj Ventress empathy for a pair of street kids leases to her to act as the hero for once. In the last take, we find Rex and Jar Jar, outgunned but not outsmarted. Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Conan The Barbarian #2(Marvel)- In what can be best explained as Conan’s ” Dances with Wolves” experience, we find the Cimirrian becoming part of a tribe he once swore was his enemy. We find Conan prisoned by this warring tribe and eventually becoming one of them. As a final battle against a greater evil, proves he can change.Aaron’s storytelling in this series is masterful as he is at his best in this story. Overall: 9 Recommendation: 9.5

Jon

Conan the Barbarian #2 (Marvel) The second issue of Marvel’s Conan improves upon the first by including a more nuanced looked at the Picts, a culture Howard used as an analog for the stereotypical version of native Americans found in most westerns. Conan must help them to defeat the ghost snakes. In the end je must choose between living with them as an equal or returning to the Aquilonian frontier where he is considered only marginally more civilized. One of the things I find interesting about Conan is that while he does enjoy some degree of privilege within his society he is still a member of a marginalized. It was good to see Aaron play with this dichotomy as it added a lot of depth to what otherwise could have been a shallow story. It was also nice to read an issue that largely stands on its own. This is another good introduction to the character for those who may have missed the debut. Asrar’s art is as on point as ever. If the creators can maintain this level of quality this will be one of the best books of the year. Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy.


Goddess Mode #2 (DC/Vertigo) My opinion is still divided on this series. While issue two adds some much needed exposition as Cassandra learns who the Tall Poppies are and what it means to be an Oracle, the story still seems to stutter in places. It feels like Zoe Quinn and Robbi Rodriguez are playing a riff on Grant Morrison and Sean Murphy. Quinn and Rodriguez may have the talent but lacking the experience the product of their effort is missing the polish I expect from Vertigo. Still there is still a lot of potential for an interesting story about how virtual worlds and coping with trauma sometimes move hand in hand. It’s a difficult book to read but it may well be worth it in the long run. Only time will tell. Rating: 6. Recommendation: Skip

House of Whispers #5 (DC/Vertigo) Too much happens in this issue for a summary to do it justice. Suffice to say Nalo Hopinkson brings the threads she’s been weaving since Sandman Universe #1 together and the glimpse we get of the tapestry being created is magnificent. If you’ve been reading The Dreaming but avoiding this title, go out and get caught up; House of Whispers is proving to be just as essential and just as good. I do hope that Dan Watters writing credit is there because Hopkinson need assistance turning out the extra-large installment; hers is a powerful and unique voice that comics need more of. DOMO Stanton’s art remains superb. Rating: 9 Recommendation: Buy

Superman #7 (DC) Brian Bendis’ run on Superman has been a mixed bag. While he does a really good job of teasing revelations that make you want to read the next issue, the impact of those revelations never quite lives up to the expectation you build upin your head. This is a good case in point as we learn a bit of what Jon Kent has been up to in the seven years he’s been exploring outer space with Jor El. And it turns out to have been kind of boring. There are times when Bendis’ decompressed style works wonders but this is not one of them. He’s had over a year’s worth of issues between this and Action and very little to show for it. The sight of Lois Lane wearing the super-suit might almost be worth it if not for her milk toast demeanor and the fact that the pages drawn by fill in artist Brandon Peterson, while competent, are not up to the standard we’ve come to expect from Ivan Reis. This book is a regrettable waste of talent. I expect more from everyone involved. Rating: 6. Recommendation: Skip.

Logan

Goddess Mode #2 (Vertigo) Bookended by frenzied, colorful action from artists Robbi Rodriguez and Rico Renzi, Goddess Mode #2 digs into the personalities of the “Tall Poppies” aka the witch, cyberpunk oracle things that rescued the protagonist Cassandra in the first issue. Zoe Quinn and Rodriguez use things like a group chat cut between scenes of the Tall Poppies doing their favorite activities to give insight into them while frantically trying to exposit the nature of their world. Goddess Mode has a very fever dream quality to it, but at least, we now (sort of) have a cast of characters to follow and latch onto in their epic, magical battles. It’s a strong book on the visual side, but there is room to improve. Overall: 7.7 Verdict: Read

Invaders #1 (Marvel) Chip Zdarsky, Carlos Magno, and wonderful WWII flashback artist Butch Guice focus on Namor in the first issue of the new Invaders series. Guice’s work is visceral and heartbreaking in the opening sequence where for all his great powers, Namor is unable to save his soldier friend, Tommy, from the Nazis in World War 2. This continues to the present day where Namor has been behaving erratically and is planning a giant invasion of the surface world. Instead of just forcing a team-up, Zdarsky and Magno add psychological depth to the relationships between Captain America, Bucky, Namor, and Jim Hammond along with an air of mystery to the time between the Golden and Silver Age of Comics when Namor was an amnesiac. Moral ambiguity in war is the through-line of this book as Cap goes against Tony and the Avengers to talk and empathize with Namor instead of punching him. I’m really excited to see what Zdarsky does with Namor’s character as he is more than just a villain and has unique connections to all corners of the Marvel Universe from the Golden Age era heroes and even the X-Men. Overall: 8.4 Verdict: Buy

Black Widow #1 (Marvel) So, Black Widow’s current status quo is that she is cloned from the one killed by HYDRA Cap, who was the really Captain America, or maybe not. Yeah, it’s a little complicated, but except for the first scene, none of that matters in Black Widow #1 by horror film directors the Soska Sisters and artist Flaviano, who brings the cartooning and can lay out an action scene. Basically, because she’s “dead”, Natasha has gone no holds barred and leaves her buddies in the Avengers, including Cap, to fight and potential kill some messed up criminals in Madripoor while rocking an eye patch like Wolverine in his Patch days. Having Natasha almost completely give into her bloodthirsty instincts is a compelling moral narrative, and the Soskas give her plenty of snarky, deadpan one-liners and roast Secret Empire while paying homage to the Russos’ action filmmaking in Captain America: Winter Soldier. She still has spy skills, but this story takes a turn into becoming a psychological thriller towards the end. It’s nice to see creators from other mediums do something different with Black Widow and explore in dark side in a more fun way that dreary grim darkness. Overall: 8.7 Verdict: Buy

Joe Ryan

Invaders #1 (Marvel) What a great first issue, and a pleasant surprise from Zdarsky and Magno. I love Zdarsky as a writer, but usually he shines in the comedic styles his books are usually shown in, but as he had shown in moments of Marvel 2 In 1, he can get serious, and this book was very serious. I am a big Namor fan, and I bought all of the dialogue and all of the big moments between Cap, Namor, Bucky, the original Human Torch, and the soldiers. This is really a war book, and it was awesome. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Fantastic Four #6 (Marvel) I am a big Aaron Kuder fan, and I am so happy he is on this book. He drew Mr. Fantastic and company so well, and I already love his version of Doom. Speaking of Doom, Dan Slott gives us classic campy mega bad Dr. Doom and I couldn’t be happier. The dialogue from his evil metal masked mouth just drips with that classic Marvel Lee/Kirby charm. This book has been solid, but this issue took it to the next level. Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Uncanny X-Men #10 (Marvel) – The book is overpriced, released too frequently, and the $8 #1 and #11 issues are silly, as is the annual coming next week after 10 weeks of the book being out. That being said, Rosenberg, Brisson, and Thompson have done a solid job so far, and I enjoyed Perez’s art. Now while I have liked this so far, we are in the Age of X-Man officially, so it could get good or bad from here. I will say the final panels of the book have me hyped! Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Buy


The Batman Who Laughs #2 (DC) – Scott Snyder and Jock on Batman are fantastic, and this is no different. I will say he really likes to punish Bats and the DC heroes (Metal anyone?), and you can tell he REALLY loves The Batman Who Laughs, and making it seem like the bad guys win a lot. Jock on art is of course fantastic on this book, and Snyder does a great job of only teasing The Grim Knight as the issues go on. This is shaping up to be a classic tale, and I have high hopes. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy


Detective Comics #996 (DC) – This was another great Bat-book this week. With only three issues in, Mankhe and Tomasi are doing such a great job on this story. I cannot wait to see where we are with The Arkham Knight and everything else that has happened by issue #1000 which isn’t far away. I highly recommend you jump on this series now, as it’s just going to get better. Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy


Well, there you have it, folks. The reviews we didn’t quite get a chance to write. See you next week!

Please note that with some of the above comics, Graphic Policy was provided FREE copies for review. Where we purchased the comics, you’ll see an asterisk (*). If you don’t see that, you can infer the comic was a review copy. In cases where we were provided a review copy and we also purchased the comic you’ll see two asterisks (**).

Alex’s Best Comics of 2018

Now that 2018 is in the history books, it’s time to have a look back at some of the comics, movies and events that really stood out for me during the year. Remember that this is all based on what I’ve read, and if your favourite comic isn’t here, it may be because I may not have read it, not because I didn’t like it.

Now that 2018 is in the history books, it’s time to have a look back at some of the comics, movies and events that really stood out for me during the year. Remember that this is all based on what I’ve read, and if your favourite comic isn’t here, it may be because I may not have read it, not because I didn’t like it.

In a break from last year, we’re just looking at comics (ongoing or miniseries). Eight of them in fact, that for one reason or another rocked my socks off.

 Eight

Black Badge (Boom) The only reason that this book is number eight and not higher is because I’m trying to be cautious of Recency Bias – that phenomenon where the most recent thing you’ve read swiftly becomes the best thing you’ve read. Although this series is six issues deep, I only started reading after the end of 2018 (which puts this in a grey area anyway, but the majority of the issues out thus far were released in 2018, so I’m counting it). In short, the two things that sold me on this was the short blurb from Brett “boy scouts being trained as assassins” and the fact that Matt Kindt is the writer.

Seven

Grumble (Albatross Funny Books) Although only a relatively new series, Grumble has captured my imagination and numbers highly on my anticipation list each month. Whether it’s the talking pug, the urban magic or the brilliant visual and verbal humour I don’t know. But I do know I can’t get enough of it.

 Six

Ninja-K (Valiant) The easiest way to describe this series is as a blending of James Bond and Batman with a liberal dose of ninja flavouring (which should be obvious by the title). Christos Gage’s run on this series delved into the back story of MI6’s Ninja Programme and exposed the manipulation and programming the agents (Ninjas A through J) had been subject too; often in the most subtle of ways, all to keep them as more effective weapons. Ninja-K, or Ninjak, gets thrown through the emotional gamut, and it’s fascinating reading.

 Five

The Immortal Hulk  (Marvel) I’m not generally a horror fan, nor do I regularly read Hulk comics with any real regularity, but there’s something about this series that struck a chord with me. This is how Hulk should be handled. As a monster barely constrained, ever deadly and with a massive presence.

 Four

X-O Manowar  (Valiant) A series that was really good in 2017, but swiftly became the best thing I was reading. Even with Valiant’s stumble with Harbinger Wars II didn’t affect the series despite the character featuring heavily in the story, and the series returned with a pair of arcs that went from strength to strength as Matt Kindt redefined what it means to be a hero and a superhuman (emphasis on human).

 Three

Old Man Logan (Marvel)  Old Man Logan was never going to live forever, especially not with the younger Wolverine returning at some point in the next year or so. We’ve known for awhile that there wouldn’t be much chance Marvel would keep both around (aside from an interesting interaction or two, I’m hoping there was a lesson learned from bringing the Original Six X-Men to the future), which has meant that the battles Old Man Logan has found himself in have been genuinely tense – a rarity these days in comic books.

 Two

The Highest House (IDW) Were it not for the fact that my top pick also had my favourite issue of the year, then The Highest House would have been much more likely to peak. A book about slavery, and how one’s circumstances don’t have to stay one’s circumstances, this is a hauntingly beautiful book that doesn’t shy away from the darker side of the high middle ages. The collected edition is one of those books that I’ll recommend to people over and over as an example of what comics are capable of, and will in time, I believe, be held in (almost) as high esteem as Maus and Watchmen.

 One

Quantum And Woody (Valiant) When Daniel Kibblesmith was writing this book it was good, but when Eliot Rahal took over with issue 6 it was like the lights had come on. His take on the brothers was funny without ever feeling forced; I have never read a better take on Quantum and Woody. Plus, this series had my absolute favourite issue of the year. Which was also the final one. The series was continually, and consistently, of a high quality in every aspect every issue, but it’s the third that was the high point with a superb interview sequence interspersed with one of the greatest two page spreads of the year, only to culminate in perhaps the most emotional scene in any comic as one character talks to another about  his fears that due to the altered timeline he may forget his wife ever existed. Without the context of the preceding issues, one would expect that the emotional impact of the scene would be lost. I assure you, it isn’t. 

Review: DuckTales #1

DuckTales01_cvrA-copyDuckTales #1 makes up for allllll the flaws of Uncle Scrooge. It continues the work of the rebooted TV show: establishing the triplets as three separate characters rather than one run-on sentence. The humor that the boys exude perfectly extends from screen to page–the unique humor that makes the show literally laugh out loud funny is inside the pages of DuckTales #1, as well.

The only flaw with DuckTales, which was a problem with Uncle Scrooge as well, is the mistreatment of Donald as a character. His anger seems weirdly under contol. Compared to the Donald that fans know and love, DuckTales Donald spouts less expletives and suffers more slapstick. The series is more about the boys, anyhow, which is where the book (and the new show) really shine.

DuckTales #1 is broken up into two stories: “The Chilling Secret of the Lighthouse” and “The Great Experiment of the Washing Machine”. Both were written by Joe Caramagna, who has an outstanding grasp of DuckTales both old and new. “Lighthouse” reflects a more classic television DuckTales story, with an ancient legend debunked by the triplets exploring “uncharted” territory. “Washing Machine” is a little more modern, with iPhones used for distraction tactics, and the boys displaying their individual personalities. Huey in particular gets to shine as the inventor of the group.

Donald Duck # 1 IDW DT

They’ve come a long way from the original depiction of “the triplets”

The stories have different artists, but  both Luca Usai (“Lighthouse”) and Gianfranco Florio (“Washing Machine”) continue the tradition of pulling from 1940s Donald Duck comics. It’s one of my favorite things about the reboot, and I’m thrilled to see it continue on both show and book. The short tales are great, but I hope that an overarching plot emerges before long. Based on the teaser of issue #2, which features Della Duck on a quest with Donald and Scrooge, readers probably won’t have to wait for clues to a much larger mystery.

WooHoo indeed.

Story: Joe Carmagna Art: Luca Usai, Gianfranco Florio
Color: Giuseppe Fontana, Dario Calabria Letterer: Tom B. Long Editor: Joe Hughes

Story: 7.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

IDW Publishing provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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