Tag Archives: ian bertram

Little Bird #1 Gets a New Printing

Award winning director/screenwriter Darcy Van Poelgeest and fan-favorite artist Ian Bertram’s highly anticipated Little Bird launched this week from Image Comics and is already being rushed back to print to keep up with overwhelming fan enthusiasm for the unique, eye-popping miniseries.

With the same limitless scope as a new East of West or Saga—and the drama and surrealism of AkiraLittle Bird follows a young resistance fighter in a science-fiction style reminiscent of Alejandro Jodorowsky.

In the world of Little Bird, North America has been devastated by three decades of war as the American Empire expands under an ultra-nationalist, theocratic government. But from the ashes of defeat rises Little Bird, a 12-year old girl who sets out to reignite the Canadian Resistance and discover her own identity in a world on fire.

Little Bird #1, second printing (Diamond Code JAN198548) will be available on Wednesday, April 10. The final order cutoff deadline for comics shop retailers is Monday, March 18.

Little Bird #2 (Diamond Code FEB190164) will be available on Wednesday, April 17. The final order cutoff deadline for comic shop retailers is Monday, March 25.

Little Bird #1, second printing

Review: Little Bird #1

Little Bird #1

Little Bird follows a young resistance fighter who battles against an oppressive American Empire and searches for her own identity in a world on fire.

Little Bird #1 is a comic I’ve been looking forward to reading for some time. The concept of a resistance standing against a religious fundamentalist American empire is a story that sounds intriguing to me. While there’s a lot to like in the first issue, there’s also some stumbling as well in its world building.

Written by Darcy Van Poelgeest, the first issue feels like a cross between Saga, We Stand on Guard, and East of West. A Canadian resistance attempts to take on the evil American empire which works as a story, it’s something we’ve seen before. Where the issue stumbles a bit is in the small details of its worldbuilding which at times feels like weird to just be weird. Bathing in blood with what looks like intestines coming out. Weird baldheaded floating intestine creatures. It’s all visually interesting but with so little explanation we’re expected to go with it. What it winds up being is somewhat of a distraction.

Little Bird is a techno-organic religious world that we’re expected to go with. While the visuals are solid, we’re left wondering about those interesting concepts and it doesn’t help matters. A more straightforward visual would have helped. Getting rid of the weird focuses the story a bit. All of these things might be explained but in the first issue it’s all left hanging.

The concepts though are neat and the story pretty easy to get in to if you’re willing to overlook these open questions. The characters are interesting. The conflict has a lot of potential. The juxtaposition of societies is solid. There’s a lot of set up for what’s to come and a good inclusion on what we need to know of the past.

The art by Ian Bertram is absolutely interesting and as I said above, it can be distracting as well. Joined on colors by Matt Hollingsworth and lettering by Aditya Bidikar, the issue is one that has so many small things for you to linger on the page and stare at. While those visuals absolutely help build the world and hint at what we’re dealing with, they also aren’t explained enough and seem a bit odd for odd’s sake. Those cool visuals also distract without an explanation of the “why” and “what.”

The first issue has a lot of potential and I want to see where it goes. There’s a good chance the miniseries will read better as a whole than it does as single issues and those issues I have with the weird visuals will be explained later. Little Bird #1 absolutely creates and builds an interesting world but leaves too much out there not explained or acknowledged to not distract from the main story.

Story: Darcy Van Poelgeest Art: Ian Bertram
Color: Matt Hollingsworth Letterer: Aditya Bidikar

Design: Ben Didier
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Darcy Van Poelgeest, Ian Bertram, and Image Explore an Ultra-Nationalist North America in Little Bird

Director/screenwriter Darcy Van Poelgeest boasts a long list of awards and accolades for his storytelling prowess and brings the same writing finesse to Ian Bertram’s breathtakingly detailed artwork in the gorgeous, hyper-detailed miniseries Little Birdlaunching from Image Comics this March.

In the world of Little Bird, North America has been devastated by three decades of war as the American Empire expands under an ultra-nationalist, theocratic government. But from the ashes of defeat rises Little Bird, a 12-year old girl who sets out to reignite the Canadian Resistance and discover her own identity in a world on fire.

Little Bird #1 (Diamond Code JAN190099) will be available on Wednesday, March 13. The final order cutoff deadline for comics shop retailers is Monday, Feb. 18. 

Little Bird #1

Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram’s House of Penance Gets a Deluxe Library Edition

With their series House of Penance, Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram wove a macabre tale of guilt, ghosts, and guns, in a fictionalized account of Sarah Winchester’s descent into madness. Now, Dark Horse is releasing a deluxe library edition collecting all six issues of House of Penance in an oversized hardcover format with new cover art, sketchbook extras, and more.

House of Penance is a horrific tale of how fortune brings misfortune, as a grim and determined woman oversees the construction of a house twenty-four hours a day for twenty years mission to wash away the blood curse of her husband’s invention, the Winchester rifle, from claiming her own life and soul.

House of Penance Library Edition HC goes on sale March 27, 2019. This 176-page volume retails for $34.99.

Review: House of Penance #6

25856

Evil has infiltrated Sarah’s sanctuary. Even Warren Peck, her newfound protector, and confidant is overwhelmed by the spirits that seek revenge upon her. In the terrifying conclusion of Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram’s horror miniseries, Sarah is forced to confront her demons, face to face.

House of Penance #6 is a little short on dialogue by writer Tomasi but it’s filled with action as the series concludes. Sarah seems extremely jubilant as her house falls apart around it and falling apart feels like an understatement somehow though. The twist ending I think will actually surprise you.

The art by Bertram continues to shine in a terrifying and grotesque manner. I will admit the way the house falls apart reminds me of a jigsaw puzzle if it was made by M.C Escher. There’s something haunting about its image.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #5

256041

Warren Peck is surprised to discover how far he is willing to go to protect the tormented widow. Their connection deepens as Peck contemplates his bloody past and Sarah grows more determined than ever to atone for her family’s sins.

With only one more issue left of House of Penance, the end begins to crack through, both literally and figuratively, as madness seems to infect the mansion. This causes fights, racial tension, and violence as an unexpected guest arrives to attempt to stop it all. Peck is given the reason Ms. Winchester decided to build the mansion and reveals how he became who is he. There’s a lot revealed here by writer Peter Tomasi.

The art style by Ian Bertram gets a little explosive as a sea of red begins to worm its way into place. I will admit the odd dream scene widow Winchester has stands out in this issue. It shows her descent into madness as she attempts to get her family back. While I wish I could share it, the one large vertical panel in this issue is one that should get attention. The attention to detail in that panel is well done, showcasing the sheer size of the house.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #4

25603

The chaotic construction is no longer enough to keep Sarah’s ghosts at bay, so she tries something more extreme to ease her conscience. Peck’s nightmares are growing worse, too. Brought together by their dark visions, the heiress and the outlaw are getting closer, but Sarah’s sister doesn’t like it one bit.

IT’S NOT JUST THE HOUSE THAT’S HAUNTED . . .

In House of Penance #4 the past returns to haunt the house, as more Sarah’s ghosts haunt her. Both physically and emotionally things get strange, with only two issues left. I will admit I’m curious to see if more of Sarah’s family visits to see if they try to stop her descent to into madness.

Sarah’s descent into madness manages to influence the art, as it gets darker, and a little gruesome at times. While it may not all be dark, there are a few bleak spots of light. They are spread out throughout the comic which manages to give the issue a sense of balance.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #3

25602

A visitor from Winchester’s past stirs up old demons, and she must find new ways to keep them out of her unearthly mansion. Meanwhile, Warren Peck comes face to face with specters from his own past and learns that he has more in common with her than he’d thought . . .

Edgar Allen Poe would be proud of this mix of horror and the occult written by Peter Tomasi. While the occult maybe a little subtle at times, there is a clear point of it. The incredibly graphic pseudo-flashback also give the readers a peek at Mr Peck’s violent past.

The flashback of Mr Peck is a gorgeous blend of art and story by artist Ian Bertram. I will admit the subtle use of interwoven black lines around every panel leaves one wondering what they are. Are they hair from Mrs Winchester, or are they something much more sinister?

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: House of Penance #2

25601

Sarah Winchester’s house is always under construction—the banging of hammers keeps her demons at bay. Her construction crew of vagrants and murderers build, tear down, and rebuild the mansion according to her visions. But her newest employee, Warren Peck, has brought some demons of his own . . .

A historical tale of horror from creator Peter Tomasi!

House of Penance is strange, addicting, and enthralling. This second issue continues the strange vein of creepy places, strange blood red worms, and odd flashbacks courtesy of Warren Peck. Even the sea of worms seems to grow as it comes and goes. Which makes me curious as to why it is growing, along the creepy forger person who makes a brief appearance.

I will admit the more the artist zooms up on Sarah Winchester’s eyes, it makes me wonder why. There is something creepy about that vacant blue eyed stare. The last few pages artwork is stunning and creepy.  I won’t spoil what happens in those pages, but be warned it is graphic.

Story: Peter Tomasi Art: Ian Bertram
Story: 8.5 Art: 9 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Dark Horse’s House of Penance Signing at JHU

I got to meet two more comic book greats at Jim Hanley’s Universe yesterday: Peter Tomasi and Ian Bertram who were on hand to promote their new book from Dark Horse Comics, Penance.

Our very own Christopher Scott already gave it a positive review that you can check out here. After reading it myself, I concur. Penance is Tomasi’s and Bertram’s take on the mythological story behind San Jose’s Winchester Mystery House, built by Sarah Winchester, the uber wealthy widow of gun baron William Wirt Winchester.  Augmented by Bertram’s grim and macabre artwork, issue one lays the groundwork for the mystery behind Sarah’s madness and incessant infatuation with the construction of the house.

The team already have five issues penned and ready for printing, so go out and buy it, you won’t regret it!

Bonus! Tomasi also signed my copy of Superman #51:

img_0052

« Older Entries