Tag Archives: humanoids

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Gideon Falls Volume 1 (Image Comics) – Lemire and Sorrentino is a match made in comic heaven, and this is a series that doesn’t disappoint. It’s creepy, dark, and it’s perfect for Halloween!

Black Badge #3 (BOOM! Studios) – Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins resume their awesome work from Grass Kings, and now tell the tale of North Korea, Boy Scouts, and Spies. It’s wild, and one of the most original and fun books I’ve read in awhile.

Runaways #14 (Marvel Comics) – Consistently one of Marvel’s best books every single month. Rainbow Rowell and Kris Anka give such a touching and fun book, and something different from the usual superhero books.

Venom Annual #1 (Marvel Comics) – I usually don’t love annuals, and their $4.99 price tag, but this has Cates still on the book, and will serve as a great jumping on point for one of Marvel’s best.

Justice League #10 (DC Comics) – Scott Snyder and Francis Manupul is another great pair for comics this week. The series has had its pedal to the medal like usual Snyder stories and I don’t expect it to let up. This will also start the ”Drowned Earth” storyline that will be Aquaman focused, and that cover art alone has me hyped.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Shuri #1 (Marvel) – She was the break out star of Black Panther and Marvel recognizing that is giving her her own series. With T’Challa missing, she must choose between herself and her country. Can’t wait to see another perspective of Wakanda.

Archie 1941 #2 (Archie Comics) – What if Archie took place in the lead up to World War II? The first issue was really good with a good mix of history and we’re expecting more of that with this one.

Captain Ginger #1 (AHOY Comics) – AHOY has been damn near perfect with their three releases so far and we’re expecting no less from this one.

East of West #39 (Image Comics) – This weird west apocalyptic story has delivered with every issue and this far in, we want to see where it goes.

Low Road West #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue started off as a apocalyptic type story and then veered into fantasy. We’re intrigued. We’re very intrigued.

Superman Isn’t Jewish (But I Am Kinda) (Life Drawn/Humanoids) – An interesting exploration of Jewish identity in modern times.

Transformers: Optimus Prime #24 (IDW Publishing) – IDW’s current run on Transformers is winding down with everything coming together and we’re glued to the pages of every release.

The Unstoppable Wasp #1 (Marvel) – Writer Jeremy Whitley is back and so is Nadia! The first volume was beyond fantastic with a mix of fun, action, science, and girl power! We’re expecting no less and are so excited.

NYCC 2018: Humanoids Announces H1 – A New Shared Universe

Humanoids is launching a major initiative in 2019 to publish original comic book stories written and illustrated by some of the biggest names in comics. During the Humanoids 20th Anniversary In America panel at New York Comic Con, the publisher unveiled H1, an imprint of comic books, featuring a shared superpowered universe with all new characters and stories created by a dizzying lineup of comic book creators. Humanoids’ new Chief Creative Officer John Cassaday and Humanoids’ new Director of Creative Development Mark Waid are closely collaborating with a core team of H1 architects: Kwanza Osajyefo (Black, Black AF), Yanick Paquette (Wonder Woman Earth One) and Carla Speed McNeil (Finder, Sensation Comics) to create an ambitious storytelling experience with creators including Phil Briones, Vanessa Del Rey, Cheryl Lynn Eaton, Mike McKone and Afua Richardson.

Humanoids will launch H1 in Summer 2019 with 3 ongoing series, with details and creative teams being announced next year.

IGNITED

Something strange is happening to the planet… Nature itself is reshaping and redefining the balance of power. Natural disasters are breaking out everywhere, and yet, the population continues to grow rapidly. In fact, the world is becoming so dense, that certain individuals are erupting with super abilities. They are called the Ignited.

OMNI

A gifted doctor with a vibrant, compassionate personality, Cecelia Cobbina received boundless praise from her peers and her patients. But that was before the incident in Africa. Before she gained the ability to think faster than the speed of light. Overwhelmed with the power to answer every question, she must now overcome her own fears and tackle the one code she can’t seem to break: the truth behind the Ignited.

STRANGELANDS

Opposites attract? Elakshi and Adam Land aren’t married. In fact, a month ago, they were perfect strangers, dwelling in lands foreign to one another. But now, they’re forced to remain by one another’s side, for their separation could mean the planet’s demise. Now, their greatest challenge is to stay together — even if they have to tear the world apart.

In addition to H1, Humanoids will feature all new mini series featuring self-contained original stories featuring some of the biggest and most exciting names in comics, including Dennis Calero, Jock, Shawn Martinbrough, Helen Mullane, Andrea Mutti, Quinton Peeples, Dom Reardon, and Darick Roberston.

THE ORIGINAL MINI-SERIES

THE BIG COUNTRY (5 issue mini-series)

The Old West finally died in the early 1980s. We’re in Texas. And this is the story of Grissom Callahan, the last in a long line of sheriffs. Callahan has learned everything he knows from his father and his grandfather. But the old ways don’t seem to prove efficient when it comes to stopping a violent serial killer. And in a simple moment of shaking down an informant, Grissom will start a chain of events that will reshape his life and the world of law enforcement in Texas.

MEYER (5 issue mini-series)

A comedic, coming-of-age quest where the Golden Fleece is a man’s legacy, Meyer is an immigrant’s story rooted in an old mobster’s tale and a deeply moral fable. A Breaking Bad style imaginary biography of Jewish legendary mobster Meyer Lansky as he’s trying to organize his very last con job.

NICNEVIN AND THE BLOODY QUEEN (4 issue mini-series)

Something strange has been unleashed in the North of England. A modern-day druid commits a series of ghastly murders in an attempt to unleash the awesome power of the ancient gods of Great Britain. But all hell really breaks loose when his latest would-be victim, Nicnevin “Nissy” Oswald, turns out to be more than she seems. A British tale mixing black magic and horror godfathered by Jock, one of the new masters of comic book suspense!

NYCC 2018:Mark Waid is Named Director of Creative Development for Humanoids

Humanoids has named Eisner award-winning writer Mark Waid as the company’s Director of Creative Development. The unveiling of this newly-created position follows the announcement of award-winning artist John Cassaday as Humanoid’s first ever Chief Creative Officer. Both announcements come in the lead up to New York Comic Con, where the publisher will announce a major publishing initiative focused on publishing original content.

Internationally renowned for publishing seminal genre works by creators form all around the world, including The Incal by Alejandro Jodorowsky and Mœbius, Humanoids will announce its plans to publish original stories during the Humanoids 20th Anniversary In America panel on Friday, October 5 from 1:30-2:30 PM in room 1A02 of the Javits Center. Waid will appear via be pre-recorded video message for fans.

In advance of the panel, the company unveiled a logo for the publishing initiative and launched a new Twitter account.


Humanoids 20th Anniversary In America

Join Chief Creative Officer John Cassaday, Senior Editor Fabrice Sapolsky and Director of Sales and Marketing Jud Meyers for the panel that will change the way you see Humanoids forever!

Almost a dozen A-List comic creators will be in the room answering questions and celebrating 20 years in the U.S. Humanoids is about to make history again as it did in the past with legendary creators such as Moebius, Jodorowsky, Ladronn and Manara. It’s THE panel you don’t want to miss. New Projects! New Heroes! Hot creators! A bold new direction ushering in a new era in comics. Panel followed by Q&A session. Surprise collector give away for the audience!

John Cassaday Named Chief Creative Officer of Humanoids

Humanoids has named Eisner award-winning artist John Cassaday as the company’s first ever Chief Creative Officer. Internationally renowned for publishing seminal genre works by creators from all around the world, including The Incal by Alejandro Jodorowsky and Mœbius, Humanoids has been aggressively ramping up its publishing slate. Earlier this year, Humanoids debuted Life Drawn, a new imprint of literary graphic novels that spotlights slice of life stories, biographies and stories with social political themes. In naming Cassaday its Chief Creative Officer, the Los Angeles-based publisher continues its expansion while maintaining their high quality standards.

Cassaday created I Am Legion for Humanoids in 2004.

The announcement of Cassaday as Humanoids’ Chief Creative Officer comes in the lead up to New York Comic Con, where the publisher will announce a major publishing initiative during the Humanoids 20th Anniversary In America panel on Friday, October 5 from 1:30-2:30 PM in room 1A02 of the Javits Center.

Humanoids 20th Anniversary In America

Join Chief Creative Officer John Cassaday, Senior Editor Fabrice Sapolsky and Director of Sales and Marketing Jud Meyers for the panel that will change the way you see Humanoids forever!

Almost a dozen A-List comic creators will be in the room answering questions and celebrating 20 years in the U.S. Humanoids is about to make history again as it did in the past with legendary creators such as Moebius, Jodorowsky, Ladronn and Manara. It’s THE panel you don’t want to miss. New Projects! New Heroes! Hot creators! A bold new direction ushering in a new era in comics. Panel followed by Q&A session. Surprise collector give away for the audience!

Preview: Marilyn’s Monsters

Marilyn’s Monsters

by Tommy Redolfi

Marilyn’s Monsters is the latest release from Life Drawn, Humanoids’ new literary imprint, which spotlights personal stories and provocative, political narratives.

Marilyn’s Monsters presents Marilyn Monroe’s dark journey like you’ve never seen it before. The famous Hollywood Hills. A strange, twisted forest filled with freaks and broken-down trailers. In this dark world, movie stars are born in the shadows. Determined to become the greatest one of all, shy Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe) comes to this ghost-town with hopes and dreams. Unfortunately, she’ll have to face all kinds of monsters to reach her ultimate goal. . .

Humanoids’ Life Drawn Gets a Second Wave of Graphic Novels

In advance of San Diego Comic Comic International 2018, Humanoids is announcing a second wave of graphic novels for Life Drawn, its new literary imprint. Life Drawn spotlights personal stories and provocative, political narratives. The upcoming titles run the gamut, including: a biography of feminist icon and actress Hedy Lamarr, focusing on her revolutionizing scientific and technological innovations; a runner’s memoir of the New York Marathon; a hallucinatory and horror-fueled telling of Marilyn Monroe’s life and a humorous exploration of religious identity (and Krypton).

Marilyn’s Monsters by Tommy Redolfi

Publication date: September 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594655357; 248 Pages; $29.95

The famous Hollywood Hills. A strange, twisted forest filled with freaks and broken-down trailers. In this dark world, movie stars are born in the shadows. Determined to become the greatest one of all, shy Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe) comes to this ghost-town with hopes and dreams. Unfortunately, she’ll have to face all kinds of monsters to reach her ultimate goal. . . . This is Marilyn Monroe’s dark journey like you’ve never seen it before.

Kabul Disco Book 2: How I Managed Not To Get Addicted to Opium in Afghanistan by Nicolas Wild

Publication date: September 18, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594654695; 176 Pages; $19.95

In this second volume of his travelogue series, Nicolas Wild returns to Afghanistan, unfulfilled by his old life in Paris, to resume work at the Zendagui agency. This time around, however, his job is even trickier than illustrating the Constitution (see Book 1): he has to convince Afghans that “Opium is Bad” in a time when no one wants to hear what expatriates have to say. With a charming sense of humor and a genuine love for Afghanistan, Nicolas Wild depicts a series of complicated events, transpiring in a complicated country.

Superman Isn’t Jewish (But I Am . . . Kinda) by Jimmy Bemon (writer) and Emilie Boudet (artist)

Publication date: October 2, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594655982; 112 Pages; $14.95

Adapted into an eponymous short film by Jimmy Bemon.

An intimate and humorous autobiography of a boy’s quest for identity as he struggles with his heritage and his heroes. Benjamin would always proudly say, “I’m Jewish. Like Superman!” Assuming that Judaism is some kind of super power and Hebrew is akin to the Kryptonian language, Benjamin believes each of his family members is a superhero. Until, like Krypton, his world is shattered. After learning of the link between being circumcised and his religion, Ben decides to hide his heritage from everyone. Caught between the desire to avoid disappointing his Jewish father and his desire to understand his Catholic mother, Ben has to find a way to abandon his secret identity for a very public one. Humorous, timeless and universal, this personal and poignant story of acceptance and understanding shows how we all must learn to love the hero within ourselves.

My New York Marathon by Sebastien Samson

Publication date: October 30, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594657542; 192 Pages; $19.95

Published timed to the annual New York Marathon, this inspiring love-letter to the event and to the city that hosts it has already been championed by running heavyweights Jeff Galloway and Amby Burfoot, and endorsed by both the New York Road Runners club and the New York Marathon itself.

A quiet, aging teacher decides to run the New York Marathon. Along the way, he transforms into the man he always wanted to be. Sebastian, a quiet and shy teacher, decides, on a whim, to challenge his aging body and crumbling spirit and run the New York Marathon. From the streets of France to the streets of Brooklyn, Sebastian pushes himself past limits he didn’t even know he had. A humorous and poignant autobiographical tale and a love letter to the landscapes and panoramas of New York as well as a testament to the triumph of the human spirit.

Hedy Lamarr: An Incredible Life by William Roy (Writer) and Sylvain Dorange (Art)

Publication date: November 6, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656194; 176 Pages; $19.95

To her fans, Hedy Lamarr was a silver screen star; to those who knew her, she was a genius. She fashioned designs to revolutionize the planes built by Howard Hughes. In the dead of night, she tinkered with her blueprints and experiments. And when World War II began, Hedy left her superstar persona behind and claimed the patent for a strange device. One that manipulated sound, created an unbreakable code and confounded the Nazi regime, giving the allies the advantage they needed to claim victory. Scientists called it “Spread Spectrum” technology. The military called it a “secret communication system.” Today, we call it a “cell phone,” “Wi-Fi” and a little thing called “Internet.” This is the story of a genius. A visionary. And the most beautiful woman in the world.

Vietnamese Memories Book 2: Little Saigon by Clement Baloup

Publication date: November 13, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594657993; 256 Pages; $24.95

Winner of the Coup de coeur prix Michelin 2012 – Rendez-vous du Carnet de voyage

The second in a three book series exploring the stories of displaced Viet Kieu around the world, Vietnamese Memories: Little Saigon immerses us in the diaspora of the United States and the assimilation of these Vietnamese immigrant communities, labeled Little Saigons. Through trips made in 2009 and 2010, Baloup shows how the memory and culture were maintained in these Asian neighborhoods in the heart of the big American cities (Chinatown, Little Tokyo, Lao Area, etc.).

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon

“Courage” is an understated attribute that most immigrants possess but rarely were given credit for, even before our current presidential administration. As most of this xenophobia, has been going on for years, and yet they still came to our shores, which included my family. The fact that you leave the place you have known your whole life, to go somewhere else, to begin anew. To do all that and bring your family with you or to start a family after that, these actions are not what everyone has in them, these actions require fortitude and courage.

This truth rings even louder for those, who consider themselves refugees, as their search for sanctuary leads to them places where they never imagined being including America. Life can be so complicated and comforts like our First World problems becomes nonsense when you realize the problems they have. Thousands of their stories have been told, each one as interesting as the next and ones that should be told repeatedly. In Clement Baloup’s Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon, the acclaimed author seeks to tell the stories of one family across different time periods as they leave their homeland.

The book begins as a primer for readers as Baloup surveys what he believes they know from popular culture but then quickly does a deep dive into Vietnam’s history. As one family member tells the family history through the cooking of prawn, which shows the power of exposition and the connection food has to one’s family. Each member unveils what their life was during that time and each gives a reason why they left the country of their birth. By book’s end, each family member shows to their family through their stories why love will always lead the way.

Overall, an engaging set of stories that both feel intimate but is universal to every person whose family immigrated over the last century. The stories as told by Clement Baloup are lovely, visceral and enthralling. The art by Baloup is beautiful. Altogether, a great book that pushes the boundaries of storytelling and remembers that true stories are sometimes more interesting than fiction.

Story: Clement Baloup Art: Clement Baloup
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon

“Courage” is an understated attribute that most immigrants possess but rarely were given credit for, even before our current presidential administration. As most of this xenophobia, has been going on for years, and yet they still came to our shores, which included my family. The fact that you leave the place you have known your whole life, to go somewhere else, to begin anew. To do all that and bring your family with you or to start a family after that, these actions are not what everyone has in them, these actions require fortitude and courage.

This truth rings even louder for those, who consider themselves refugees, as their search for sanctuary leads to them places where they never imagined being including America. Life can be so complicated and comforts like our First World problems becomes nonsense when you realize the problems they have. Thousands of their stories have been told, each one as interesting as the next and ones that should be told repeatedly. In Clement Baloup’s Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon, the acclaimed author seeks to tell the stories of one family across different time periods as they leave their homeland.

The book begins as a primer for readers as Baloup surveys what he believes they know from popular culture but then quickly does a deep dive into Vietnam’s history. As one family member tells the family history through the cooking of prawn, which shows the power of exposition and the connection food has to one’s family. Each member unveils what their life was during that time and each gives a reason why they left the country of their birth. By book’s end, each family member shows to their family through their stories why love will always lead the way.

Overall, an engaging set of stories that both feel intimate but is universal to every person whose family immigrated over the last century. The stories as told by Clement Baloup are lovely, visceral and enthralling. The art by Baloup is beautiful. Altogether, a great book that pushes the boundaries of storytelling and remembers that true stories are sometimes more interesting than fiction.

Story: Clement Baloup Art: Clement Baloup
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

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