Tag Archives: humanoids

Humanoids’ Life Drawn Gets a Second Wave of Graphic Novels

In advance of San Diego Comic Comic International 2018, Humanoids is announcing a second wave of graphic novels for Life Drawn, its new literary imprint. Life Drawn spotlights personal stories and provocative, political narratives. The upcoming titles run the gamut, including: a biography of feminist icon and actress Hedy Lamarr, focusing on her revolutionizing scientific and technological innovations; a runner’s memoir of the New York Marathon; a hallucinatory and horror-fueled telling of Marilyn Monroe’s life and a humorous exploration of religious identity (and Krypton).

Marilyn’s Monsters by Tommy Redolfi

Publication date: September 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594655357; 248 Pages; $29.95

The famous Hollywood Hills. A strange, twisted forest filled with freaks and broken-down trailers. In this dark world, movie stars are born in the shadows. Determined to become the greatest one of all, shy Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe) comes to this ghost-town with hopes and dreams. Unfortunately, she’ll have to face all kinds of monsters to reach her ultimate goal. . . . This is Marilyn Monroe’s dark journey like you’ve never seen it before.

Kabul Disco Book 2: How I Managed Not To Get Addicted to Opium in Afghanistan by Nicolas Wild

Publication date: September 18, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594654695; 176 Pages; $19.95

In this second volume of his travelogue series, Nicolas Wild returns to Afghanistan, unfulfilled by his old life in Paris, to resume work at the Zendagui agency. This time around, however, his job is even trickier than illustrating the Constitution (see Book 1): he has to convince Afghans that “Opium is Bad” in a time when no one wants to hear what expatriates have to say. With a charming sense of humor and a genuine love for Afghanistan, Nicolas Wild depicts a series of complicated events, transpiring in a complicated country.

Superman Isn’t Jewish (But I Am . . . Kinda) by Jimmy Bemon (writer) and Emilie Boudet (artist)

Publication date: October 2, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594655982; 112 Pages; $14.95

Adapted into an eponymous short film by Jimmy Bemon.

An intimate and humorous autobiography of a boy’s quest for identity as he struggles with his heritage and his heroes. Benjamin would always proudly say, “I’m Jewish. Like Superman!” Assuming that Judaism is some kind of super power and Hebrew is akin to the Kryptonian language, Benjamin believes each of his family members is a superhero. Until, like Krypton, his world is shattered. After learning of the link between being circumcised and his religion, Ben decides to hide his heritage from everyone. Caught between the desire to avoid disappointing his Jewish father and his desire to understand his Catholic mother, Ben has to find a way to abandon his secret identity for a very public one. Humorous, timeless and universal, this personal and poignant story of acceptance and understanding shows how we all must learn to love the hero within ourselves.

My New York Marathon by Sebastien Samson

Publication date: October 30, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594657542; 192 Pages; $19.95

Published timed to the annual New York Marathon, this inspiring love-letter to the event and to the city that hosts it has already been championed by running heavyweights Jeff Galloway and Amby Burfoot, and endorsed by both the New York Road Runners club and the New York Marathon itself.

A quiet, aging teacher decides to run the New York Marathon. Along the way, he transforms into the man he always wanted to be. Sebastian, a quiet and shy teacher, decides, on a whim, to challenge his aging body and crumbling spirit and run the New York Marathon. From the streets of France to the streets of Brooklyn, Sebastian pushes himself past limits he didn’t even know he had. A humorous and poignant autobiographical tale and a love letter to the landscapes and panoramas of New York as well as a testament to the triumph of the human spirit.

Hedy Lamarr: An Incredible Life by William Roy (Writer) and Sylvain Dorange (Art)

Publication date: November 6, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656194; 176 Pages; $19.95

To her fans, Hedy Lamarr was a silver screen star; to those who knew her, she was a genius. She fashioned designs to revolutionize the planes built by Howard Hughes. In the dead of night, she tinkered with her blueprints and experiments. And when World War II began, Hedy left her superstar persona behind and claimed the patent for a strange device. One that manipulated sound, created an unbreakable code and confounded the Nazi regime, giving the allies the advantage they needed to claim victory. Scientists called it “Spread Spectrum” technology. The military called it a “secret communication system.” Today, we call it a “cell phone,” “Wi-Fi” and a little thing called “Internet.” This is the story of a genius. A visionary. And the most beautiful woman in the world.

Vietnamese Memories Book 2: Little Saigon by Clement Baloup

Publication date: November 13, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594657993; 256 Pages; $24.95

Winner of the Coup de coeur prix Michelin 2012 – Rendez-vous du Carnet de voyage

The second in a three book series exploring the stories of displaced Viet Kieu around the world, Vietnamese Memories: Little Saigon immerses us in the diaspora of the United States and the assimilation of these Vietnamese immigrant communities, labeled Little Saigons. Through trips made in 2009 and 2010, Baloup shows how the memory and culture were maintained in these Asian neighborhoods in the heart of the big American cities (Chinatown, Little Tokyo, Lao Area, etc.).

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Luisa: Now and Then

The hardest thing one must come to realize about one’s self is either you must take the path put upon you or you take a path of your choosing. This is not as easy as it sounds and it never is. I remember when I was in high school I had no desire to join the military. The only plans I had was to hopefully get a basketball scholarship and go to a college where I can get a college degree. This all changed when one morning. In my high school, they told all seniors to report to the school library where we all had to take the ASVAB test and as they say, “the rest is history”.

Now more than 20 years later those same dreams I had looks like a “fantasy” compared to what my life has been. I don’t regret any of it but I can only imagine where my life would have gone if I had taken a different path. I can only imagine for many of my friends in high school how different their worlds would have been, if they have gone the route I went. In Carole Maurel’s (adapted by Mariko TamakiLuisa: Now and Then one such young lady grapples with self-acceptance and sexuality as the protagonist is presented as a teenager and as a 32-year-old.

We meet Luisa at 15 years old and 32 years old, on a seemingly ordinary day, as both are intertwined. Both selves of Luisa are in the same time and space. Her older self has just realized who she is with the help of a friendly stranger. Slowly the older Luisa starts to put the details together as her younger self had been hiding a part of herself in her diary that she is secretly in love with a girl. What follows is an actual series of talks between her 15 year old self and her 32 year old self. Not everything is going as good as one would hope as the fact that they occupy the same time and space is starting to influence both. By book’s end, Luisa not only accepts who she is. Luisa knows who she is and loves freely.

Overall, an excellent book which tackles identity, sexuality, family pressures, and love in all its splendor. The story by Maurel is funny, relevant, poignant, and fascinating. The art by Maurel, is sumptuous, naturalistic, and elegant. Altogether, a book that gives time travel fans a prolonged scene in 273 pages of the sequence fans of Back To The Future II we would have liked to seen between the younger and older versions of Elisabeth Shue’s Jennifer seeing herself.

Story: Carole Maurel Art: Carole Maurel Adapted by: Mariko Tamaki
Story: 10 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon

“Courage” is an understated attribute that most immigrants possess but rarely were given credit for, even before our current presidential administration. As most of this xenophobia, has been going on for years, and yet they still came to our shores, which included my family. The fact that you leave the place you have known your whole life, to go somewhere else, to begin anew. To do all that and bring your family with you or to start a family after that, these actions are not what everyone has in them, these actions require fortitude and courage.

This truth rings even louder for those, who consider themselves refugees, as their search for sanctuary leads to them places where they never imagined being including America. Life can be so complicated and comforts like our First World problems becomes nonsense when you realize the problems they have. Thousands of their stories have been told, each one as interesting as the next and ones that should be told repeatedly. In Clement Baloup’s Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon, the acclaimed author seeks to tell the stories of one family across different time periods as they leave their homeland.

The book begins as a primer for readers as Baloup surveys what he believes they know from popular culture but then quickly does a deep dive into Vietnam’s history. As one family member tells the family history through the cooking of prawn, which shows the power of exposition and the connection food has to one’s family. Each member unveils what their life was during that time and each gives a reason why they left the country of their birth. By book’s end, each family member shows to their family through their stories why love will always lead the way.

Overall, an engaging set of stories that both feel intimate but is universal to every person whose family immigrated over the last century. The stories as told by Clement Baloup are lovely, visceral and enthralling. The art by Baloup is beautiful. Altogether, a great book that pushes the boundaries of storytelling and remembers that true stories are sometimes more interesting than fiction.

Story: Clement Baloup Art: Clement Baloup
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon

“Courage” is an understated attribute that most immigrants possess but rarely were given credit for, even before our current presidential administration. As most of this xenophobia, has been going on for years, and yet they still came to our shores, which included my family. The fact that you leave the place you have known your whole life, to go somewhere else, to begin anew. To do all that and bring your family with you or to start a family after that, these actions are not what everyone has in them, these actions require fortitude and courage.

This truth rings even louder for those, who consider themselves refugees, as their search for sanctuary leads to them places where they never imagined being including America. Life can be so complicated and comforts like our First World problems becomes nonsense when you realize the problems they have. Thousands of their stories have been told, each one as interesting as the next and ones that should be told repeatedly. In Clement Baloup’s Vietnamese Memories Book 1: Leaving Saigon, the acclaimed author seeks to tell the stories of one family across different time periods as they leave their homeland.

The book begins as a primer for readers as Baloup surveys what he believes they know from popular culture but then quickly does a deep dive into Vietnam’s history. As one family member tells the family history through the cooking of prawn, which shows the power of exposition and the connection food has to one’s family. Each member unveils what their life was during that time and each gives a reason why they left the country of their birth. By book’s end, each family member shows to their family through their stories why love will always lead the way.

Overall, an engaging set of stories that both feel intimate but is universal to every person whose family immigrated over the last century. The stories as told by Clement Baloup are lovely, visceral and enthralling. The art by Baloup is beautiful. Altogether, a great book that pushes the boundaries of storytelling and remembers that true stories are sometimes more interesting than fiction.

Story: Clement Baloup Art: Clement Baloup
Story: 9.6 Art: 9.3 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Humanoids Announces a New Literary Imprint, Life Drawn Focused on Personal and Political Narratives

Humanoids is launching a new literary imprint in 2018, timed to the company’s 20th anniversary of publishing its acclaimed books in the United States. Best known for seminal genre works including The Incal (Alejandro Jodorowsky, Mœbius) and The Metabarons (Jodorowsky, Gimenez) and internationally renowned creators, including Milo Manara and Jose Ladronn, Humanoids will make a bold break from tradition with its new endeavor. Launching on April 4th, the Life Drawn imprint will publish graphic novels featuring deeply personal and powerful political narratives; these are stories grounded in life on earth, not among the stars.

Life Drawn’s debut season features titles representing a wide spectrum of art styles, tone, and social and cultural perspectives:

Kabul Disco: How I Managed Not to Be Abducted in Afghanistan by Nicolas Wild
Publication date: April 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594658686; 160 Pages; $19.95
LIFE DRAWN debuts with the first volume of a satire-laced travel memoir by cartoonist Nicolas Wild about his experiences in Afghanistan, drawing an adaptation of of the Afghan constitution. Wild provides insights into international politics, a war-ravaged country and the lives of his fellow expatriates. In a dazzling passage, Wild explores the fragile state of American democracy through the story of a woman who was working for the Bush campaign in 2000 and was responsible for vote counting in one of Florida’s three counties, ultimately making the fateful phone call that helped swing the election. Acclaimed cartoonist Guy Delisle (Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea) declares that Wild’s “satirical and at times absurdist perspective plunges us into the daily life of a group of expatriates in the heart of Kabul, a city still reeling from the last war. His witty sense of humor makes him an excellent travel companion.” Book Two will be published in September.

Vietnamese Memories: Leaving Saigon by award-winning writer and artist Clément Baloup
Publication date: May 29, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656583; 164 Pages; $19.95
The first of a three-volume testimonial to the courage and endurance of five different families displaced from their native country by war and colonialism and forced to assimilate in unfamiliar lands, watching their heritage slowly disappear. As Doan Hoang, the award-winning director of Oh, Saigon, says in her introduction of Book One, “History is mostly told by the privileged and powerful, and rarely by those who are most affected. . . . In this sumptuously beautiful and important graphic novel, you will intimately bear witness to what so few in the world have been privy to.”

Luisa: Now and Then by Carole Maurel, Adapted by‎ Mariko Tamaki (This One Summer)
Publication date: June 20, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594656439; 272 Pages; $29.95
A queer transformative tale about self-acceptance and sexuality, written and illustrated by Carole Maurel and adapted by national bestseller Mariko Tamaki, Caldecott Award–winning creator of This One Summer. A disillusioned photographer has a chance encounter with her lost teenage self who has miraculously traveled into the future. Together, both women ultimately discover who they really are, finding the courage to live life by being true to themselves. The book will be published in June, timed to Pride Month.

Madame Cat by Nancy Peña
Publication date: July 4, 2018; ISBN: 978-1594658136; 128 pages; $12.95
Hilarious vignettes presenting the love, laughter and frustrations of a pet who thinks she’s an owner! With narrative mastery, creator Nancy Peña brings us bite-sized sketches that appeal to cat lovers of all ages.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

X-MEN RED #1Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Jon

Top Pick: Incognegro: A Graphic Mystery and Incognegro: Renaissance #1 (Dark Horse/Berger Books) – These are some of the best things I’ve read in a long time in any form. A great examination of race in America wrapped up in a nail biting thriller and more relevant than ever.

 

Brett

Top Pick: X-Men: Red #1 (Marvel) – A new X-Men team with a returned Jean Grey as the leader? I’m intrigued where this one will go and if this is the tipping point of “X” bloat, which we’re already near. But, a big character returning to a world that’s vastly different has me very intrigued.

Avengers #679 (Marvel) – “No Surrender” has been a lot of fun so far. A rare event that’s holding up in quality.

Black Lightning: Cold Dead Hands #4 (DC Comics) – A great mix of action and socio-political commentary. Exactly how it’s supposed to be done.

Carthago (Humanoids) – I’m a Jaws fan, so a comic that sounds like it’s another terror from below with sharks story, I’m in.

Coyotes #4 (Image Comics) – Fantastic horror with so many layers. You’ll be debating what it all means and the symbolism. Don’t think there’s much out there today like this series.

Exit Stage Left: The Snagglepuss Chronicles #2 (DC Comics) – One of the best comics of 2018 so far. This will easily wind up on “best of” lists.

Infinity Countdown: Adam Warlock #1 (Marvel) – A big event is kicking off, big enough that it shook up plans for ongoing series. With a movie coming up touching upon some of the same characters and concepts, this should be interesting.

Mech Cadet Yu #6 (BOOM! Studios) – One of my favorite series. Just so much fun to read. In short, kids and giant robots kick alien ass.

Around the Tubes

The weekend is coming up and lets face it, we’re all just counting down the days until Black Panther. While you wait for that, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

The Onion – Man Prefers Comic Books That Don’t Insert Politics Into Stories About Government-Engineered Agents Of War – Nailed it.

Kotaku – After 27 Years, Manga Akagi Ends Today – That’s a hell of a run!

The Beat – Help Wanted: Humanoids Inc. Is Hiring! – Looking for a job in comics?

RollingOut – Urbanime founder Chris Walker creates ‘Relic,’ merges hip-hop and comic books – Sounds really interesting.

Bustle – ‘Speak’ By Laurie Halse Anderson Will Be A Graphic Novel & The Author Is Seeking RAINN Donations To Celebrate – An important piece of work.

 

Reviews

Comic Attack – Bingo Love

ICv2 – Bizarre Romance

Comic Book – JLA/Doom Patrol Special #1

Newsarama – JLA/Doom Patrol Special #1

IGN – JLA/Doom Patrol Special #1

Jud Meyers has joined Humanoids, Inc. as Director of Sales & Marketing

Humanoids, Inc. has announced that it has hired Jud Meyers as Director of Sales & Marketing.

Jud Meyers began his career in the comics industry behind the scenes at Titan Publishing in London. From 1989 through 1994, he managed and assisted in the launching of the some of the most prestigious comic book retail stores in the UK, including Forbidden Planet and Virgin Megastore. In 2003, Jud opened his first brick and mortar location in Sherman Oaks, California. In just under four years, Earth-2 Comics became the youngest store to ever receive the Will Eisner Spirit of Retailing Award. In 2009, Meyers partnered with Geoff Johns and purchased the legendary San Fernando Valley Golden Apple Comics store. Blastoff Comics, his latest retail location in North Hollywood, California has been thriving since it opened in 2012, earning praise for its dedication to charitable works and the preservation of the vintage comic book market.

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