Tag Archives: humanoids

Dark Horse, Humanoids, Valiant, and Impact Theory Join Graphite Comics

Graphite Comics, Inc. announced today the arrival of four new publishers to their popular freemium streaming comic book platform, Graphite. World renowned publishers Dark Horse, Humanoids, Valiant, and Impact Theory will join over 500 other publishers and content creators already active on the platform, adding to Graphite’s existing library of over 25,000 comic books, webtoons, webcomics, and manga.

Among the most well-known titles releasing on Graphite are Hellboy, The Witcher, Aliens and Umbrella Academy from Dark Horse, The Incal, The Metabarons, and The Twilight Man from Humanoids, Bloodshot from Valiant, and Steve Aoki’s Neon Future from Impact Theory.

The new publishers join an already impressive roster including BOOM! Studios, IDW Publishing, Legendary, Aspen, Dynamite, Papercutz, Top Cow, Markosia and Tidalwave, as well as hundreds of independent artists who self-publish creator-owned content on the platform via Graphite’s Upload system.

Graphite is a streaming comic distribution platform offering both free-to-read, ad-supported comics and a monthly subscription for users who want access to the full catalog, with no ads and early access to read without interruptions. Graphite also boasts the highest image quality available for comic book content on mobile and web, an AI driven recommendation system, and a suite of social and discovery features and tools, which facilitate the sharing and promotion of comic content by publishers, creators and fans alike.

Graphite is unique in that it offers readers content in all formats, including digital print, graphic novels, manga, vertical scrolling webtoons, web comics and comic strips.

Graphite offers a $4.99 monthly subscription that gives user full access to all premium content and an ad-free experience.

With Graphite Upload, any creator and publisher can self-publish comics in any format such as digital print, webtoons, webcomics, strips and right-to-left reading manga in minutes in any language. With Graphite’s revenue share platform, creators can track their stats and earnings in real time.

Graphite

Chasing Echoes is a Family’s Pilgrimage to Poland: From Auschwitz to Synagogues to… An Elton John Concert?

Like many families, the Blooms are keen to reconnect with their past. And so it’s decided that the entire extended family will go on a pilgrimage to their grandfather’s pre-Holocaust home in Poland. Inspired by real events, the original graphic novel Chasing Echoes, by Eisner-nominated writer Dan Goldman and acclaimed artist George Schall, follows the chaotic, quirky Blooms as they return to the homeland of their since-passed patriarch to search for his family’s mill, abandoned many years ago after the Nazis moved in.

Chasing Echoes will be published by Humanoids, the publisher of some of the world’s most groundbreaking science fiction and fantasy graphic novels, as part of the company’s acclaimed LifeDrawn imprint, which showcases deeply personal and political stories inspired not by science fiction but the world around us. 

The Blooms are, well, a mess. Orthodox cousin Ruach is struggling without a husband in Israel. Agnostic Uncle Jack grapples with finding meaning in an indifferent world. And then there’s Malka, the family’s black sheep who is broke, recently divorced, and the Bloom family’s self-appointed historian. As she discovers from an ill-timed Facebook post, all of Malka relatives are finally making a decades-in-the-planning trip to the Old Country… except for her. After finagling herself a ticket as the self-appointed “Keeper of the Family Archives,” it becomes clear that the family has drifted apart and everyone’s brought more baggage than just their suitcases. And once the Blooms are stuck together on a rickety bus as they travel through Poland, the complicated family dynamics that bubble up can no longer be ignored as they butts heads on complicated subjects like otherness, memory, faith, and the slipperiness of time.

What does it mean to never forget? What do we owe not only to past generations but to future generations? What would healing look like, if it were possible? Chasing Echoes grapples with these tough, unanswerable questions—and does so with big-hearted empathy and humor. We follow the Bloom family as they travel from Auschwitz to synagogues to an Elton John concert and, finally, to the very place that they’ve been looking for. When confronted with their reflection in the ruins of their grandfather’s old mill, they realize that they’ve been running from themselves—and each other—for too long.

Chasing Echoes will be available in bookstores on November 11th and in comic shops on November 12.

Chasing Echoes

Humanoids’ Ignited Gets Triggered this Week

Ignited Vol. 1 Triggered

Controversial, political and timely, Humanoids H1 shared universe has the comic book industry talking. H1 is a bold initiative for Humanoids, the publisher of some of the world’s most iconic and groundbreaking science fiction and fantasy graphic novels, as it marks both the first time that the Los Angeles-based publisher has released monthly comic books or set out to create a shared universe. This week marks the graphic novel publication of H1’s flagship title, Ignited: Triggered by co-writers Mark Waid and Kwanza Osajyefo, artist Phil Briones and colorist Andrew Crossley, a trade paperback collection of the series’ first four issues, featuring a cover by Humanoids’ Chief Creative Officer John Cassaday

In Ignited: Triggered, the lives of six teenagers are changed forever following a school shooting, turning the end of the school year into a nightmare for the kids of Phoenix Academy High School. Now, only a few months later, they’re expected to get back to their studies, but nothing will ever be the same. Especially for six of them whose newly acquired superpowers won’t be enough to restore balance to their world. Now the choice is in their hands. Will they fight for order…or surrender to chaos?

When Ignited returns with issue 5, in December, two months have passed since the “March of Mercy” events. Media darlings the “Phoenix Five” are using their abilities to bring change. They’re heroes to most–but not to Brent Smythe, an Arizona radio personality pushing conspiracy theories about the kids. He and some new allies are actively hunting them down, and the Five can’t hide from a world full of cameras and connected via social media.

Ignited: Triggered is available in bookstores on October 15th and in comic shops on October 16th. Ignited issue 5, the start of the “Doxxed” storyline, will be published in December.

Review: Meyer

Meyer

Al Pacino is one of those actors whose onscreen magnetism makes every movie he makes a must see. Movie audiences have been drawn to the iconic actor ever since he graced the screen in the original Godfather. His penchant for tough guys has been his calling card, often playing rough characters whose lives have not always been the best. His role in Donnie Brasco was probably some of his best work and he didn’t even occupy the titular role.

One of his best roles of recent, and probably one that is so underrated, is Stand Up Guys. It’s a movie about aging gangsters trying to find equity one last time. It’s a nod to a long-celebrated genre which hadn’t had entries in recent years and to a generation whose contributions had largely been forgotten. In a fictional telling of a historical figure we get a reimagining of the infamous gangster, Meyer Lansky, in Meyer, where he gets to pull off one last job.

We meet Meyer in a retirement home in Florida where he is operating an assumed name of Morris Gluck. He suffers endless disrespect and feels as though the community is sucking the life out of him. This all changes when one of the orderlies David breaks Lansky out for one last con job.

Overall, Meyer is an excellent graphic novel which is across between Bubba Ho-Tep if it had gangsters and Pineapple Express if it was a serious drama. The story by Jonathan Lang is engaging and intense. The art by the creative team is captivating. Altogether, a story that is both fun and a love letter  to those gangster movies everyone loves.

Story: Jonathan Lang
Art: Andrea Mutti, Shawn Martinbrough,
and Andre Szymanowicz
Story: 9.7 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.66 Recommendation: Buy

Preview: The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

(W) Koren Shadmi (A) Koren Shadmi
In Shops: Oct 09, 2019
SRP: $22.95

A biographical tale that follows Hollywood revolutionary Rod Serling’s rise to fame in the Golden Age of Television, and his descent into his personal Twilight Zone.

Before he became The Twilight Zone’s revered master of science fiction, Rod Serling was a just a writer who had to fight to make his voice heard. He vehemently challenged the networks and viewership alike to expand their minds and standards-rejecting notions of censorship, racism and war. He pushed the television industry to the edge of glory, and himself to the edge of sanity. Rod operated in a dimension beyond that of contemporary society, making him both a revolutionary and an outsider.

The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

Review: The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television

When one thinks about The Twilight Zone, you cannot help but be reminded of the show’s narrator Rod Serling. The two are inextricably connected for the rest of time and for good reason. The show has had major influences on every anthology that followed and is by far what all will be judged by in comparison. The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television explores his creation of the show and beyond.

It’s no wonder that the show has been rebooted and reimagined at least three times, eachwith varying success no matter who is at the helm. Needless to say, the one helmed by the originator is the one that has preserved throughout the ages and by far is the gold standard.

Serling’s infinite imagination and genius to recognize the void on television in the first place is what made the show his legacy is most known for. He’s been made more iconic with every passing decade. Under Koren Shadmi’s skillful portrayal of a life both normal and extraordinary, we find out exactly who Sterling was in The Twilight Man: Rod Serling And The Birth Of Television.

The graphic novel dives into Serling’s life. Like one of his most celebrated episodes, the graphic novel opens with him sitting next to a women who has no clue who he is. He recounts his time in the military, the fighting to become a paratrooper, the missions he went on, and te distraction that comics and listening to broadcasts provided him.

His time in the military and the horrors of war would impact him and haunt his life as he witnessed the carnage that the Allies and the people of the Philippines faced in World War II. This would lead to PTSD and night terrors, something he’d have to deal with for the rest of his life.

In an effort to make strides to move forward, he would enroll in Antioch College, which fueled his writing and where he met his wife while he worked as a manager at the school radio station. He would go on to write an anthology radio show, one that would be of great success, thanks to his wife, Carol,  which would start him on a path to his dream. This lead to him entering a national competition and then a job as a staff writer at a local news station in Cincinnati.

He would continue to write pitches until one day, one of his teleplays got bought and he would make his way onto television, which was a new medium at the time, one which would change how people would consume entertainment forever. He would go on to create The Twilight Zone, only for the pilot to be shelved by CBS until Desi Arnez stepped in and recognized Serling’s genius in the pilot script itself.

The graphic novel explores his landmark deal that would influence television for years to come and the pressure that built due to expectations. This lead to drama behind the camera physically and mentally which is all explored.

Shadmi takes on interesting tidbits like his work on Planet of the Apes and Night Gallery. And it explores his later years teaching at a local college in Ithaca, New York.

Overall, The Twilight Man: Rod Serling and the Birth of Television is an excellent and engrossing depiction of Serling’s life and legacy. The story by Shadmi is brisk, intellectual, and well developed. The art by Shadmi I breathtaking. Altogether, if you’ve never watched one episode of The Twilight Zoe, you will more than enjoy this tribute to this legend.

Story: Koren Shadmi Art: Koren Shadmi
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Transformers: Galaxies #1

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Bad Reception #2 (Aftershock) – The first issue was fantastic with an Agatha Christie vibe and commentary on modern technology. Hoping for more of the same with the second issue.

Batman/Superman #2 (DC Comics) – The first issue setting up the next major story of corrupted heroes was surprisingly good. With an evil Shazam now staring at our heroes, this issue should be full of action and excitement.

Bloodshot #1 (Valiant) – It’s a new beginning for the classic character as Valiant begins to focus on the upcoming film.

Chris Ware’s Rusty Brown (Pantheon Books) – Chris Ware’s latest highly anticipated graphic novel that takes on nothing less than humanity and existence.

Criminal #8 (Image Comics) – Stil one of the best comics on the market. If you like crime stories, it’s a must get.

Frogcatchers (Gallery 13) – Jeff Lemire’s latest graphic novel is a surreal descent into one man’s psychosis.

Harleen #1 (DC Comics/DC’s Black Label) – Stejpan Sejic takes on Harley Quinn and we’re beyond excited to see the result.

Meyer (Humanoids) – An imaginary biography of the legendary Jewish mobster as he attempts to organize his last con job. It just sounds fun.

New Mutants: War Children #1 (Marvel) – Chris Claremont and Bill Sienkiewicz reteam for this never before told story of the New Mutants’ past.

The Plot #1 (Vault Comics) – A new horror story from Michael Moreci, Tim Daniel, and Josh Hixson in time for Halloween.

Powers of X #5 (Marvel) – We’ve been debating a lot internally about this series but no matter good or bad, we all want to see where this goes.

Red Winter #3 (Scout Comics) – We thought this was a straight-up gangster series set in Russia but the end of the second issue has our heads still spinning and wanting to see what’s next.

Relics of Youth #1 (Vault Comics) – Teenagers around the world deam of a mysterious island. Then one day they all wake up with tattoos only six of them can see. It’s a mysterious discovery of an unknown paradise.

SFSX #1 (Image Comics) – This was to be a part of Vertigo’s relaunch but not so much. That alone has us intrigued.

Snowpiercer: Extinction (Titan Comics) – A prequel to the fantastic sci-fi series. We love the originals and can’t wait for anything new in this universe.

Strikeforce #1 (Marvel) – Blade, Angela, Spider-Woman, Wiccan, the Winter Soldier, Monica Rambeau and Daimon Hellstrom join forces and that lineup alone has us excited.

Transformers Galaxies #1 (IDW Publishing) – IDW’s Transformers relaunch has a bit mixed in quality but a new series focused on the Constructicans has us intrigued.

Preview: Meyer

Meyer

Story: Jonathan Lang
Art: Andrea Mutti
Cover: Shawn Martinbrough
Color: Andre Szymanowicz
Letters: A Larger World Studios

Humanoids, the Los Angeles-based publisher of some of the world’s most iconic and groundbreaking science fiction and fantasy graphic novels, is publishing MEYER, a fictional biography of Meyer Lansky by writer Jonathan Lang (Feeding Ground) and acclaimed international artist Andrea Mutti (Rebels), featuring a cover by Shawn Martinbrough (Thief of Thieves), colors by Andre Szymanowicz and lettering by A Larger World Studios. The original graphic novel MEYER imagines the legendary Jewish mobster’s very last con job. As you might expect, there are some unforeseen complications.

In this sun-soaked noir set in Miami Beach, Meyer Lansky is dead… or at least that’s what he wants his enemies to believe. But the old man has one last job to pull off, and he can’t do it alone. Once he recruits an innocent bystander, their journey propels them headlong into an adventure filled with murder and malice, towards an ending neither could possibly have foreseen.

The highly anticipated graphic novel goes on sale in bookstores on September 24, 2019 and in comic shops on September 25, 2019.

Around the Tubes

King Thor #1

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are you looking forward to? Sound off in the comments below!

The Beat – A Year of Free Comics: True Beauty worth beholding – Free comics!

Newsarama – John Wesley Shipp to Run Another Lap for Crisis on Infinite Earths – Report – Yes, please!

Newsarama – DC Editor Rob Levin Named Humanoids’ New Senior Editor – The publisher is making some moves.

Newsarama – DC Editor Molly Mahan Jumps to Riot Games – Interesting move.

Reviews

Comics Bulletin – Horns
Newsarama –
King Thor #1
Talking Comics –
Legion of Super-Heroes: Millennium #1
Comics Bulletin –
Night Moves
The Beat –
Stargazing
The Beat –
Stunt

Humanoids’ Omni #1 Heads Back for a Second Printing

Humanoids is going back to press for the debut issue of Omni, the breakout hit series from the company’s new H1 Ignition shared universe. Omni #1 by writer Devin Grayson, artist Alitha E. Martinez, and colorist Bryan Valenza, with lettering by A Larger World Studios, has received widespread critical acclaim. Both the second printing of OMNI issue 1 and issue 2 will be published on September 25, 2019.

Omni #1 2nd printing
« Older Entries