Tag Archives: graphic novel

Lilah Sturges Goes on Tour this Winter to Promote Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass

BOOM! Studios has announced a winter book tour in support of Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass, the historic first original graphic novel in the history of the series that’s sold over a million copies worldwide. Eisner Award-nominated writer Lilah Sturges will visit book stores, libraries, and comic shops across the United States to meet with fans and sign copies of this landmark release.

The Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass Winter Book Tour stops include:

  • Saturday, November 24th, Houston: 1:00-3:00pm at Brazos Bookstore
  • Sunday, November 25th, Los Angeles: 5:00-7:00pm at Chevalier’s Bookstore
  • Monday, November 26th, Los Angeles: 5:00-7:00pm at East County LA Public Library
  • Wednesday, November 28th, Portland: 5:00-6:00pm at Books With Pictures
  • Thursday, November 29th, Seattle: 6:00-8:00pm at Outsiders Comics & Geek Boutique
  • Friday, November 30th, Minneapolis: 7:00-8:30pm at Barnes & Noble Minneapolis
  • Saturday, December 1st, Chicago: 4:00-6:00pm at Challengers Comics + Conversation

Lumberjanes: The Infernal Compass, from Sturges and rising-star artist polterink, features a stunning cover by Alexa Sharpe and presents an all-new story at Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s camp for Hardcore Lady-Types when Mal, Ripley, Molly, April, and Jo become separated during an orienteering outing thanks to a mysterious compass. While Molly begins to feel more and more insecure about the effect of her relationship with Mal on the other girls, a lonely woman explorer is trying to steal the compass…with the help of some weirdly polite automaton butlers, of course.

Review: Loa Chapter 1

Throughout fiction, when it comes to demigods, there is no one more celebrated than Hercules. I remember watching the television show when it was on television, starring Kevin Sorbo. Throughout the show, he was saving humans from the wrath of gods and goddesses. The show for most watchers, including myself, gave us a dearth of knowledge about ancient Greek mythology.

As I became enamored with reading about mythology not only from that part of the world, but from where my parents were from, my exposure lead me to ask the obvious question. Why aren’t there any fictional books about Filipino and Black mythology? It wasn’t until recently writers noticed these gaps and sought to fill them with rich mythology from all parts of the world. In the genius Loa : Chapter 1, the creators sought to remix the mythology close to them and in doing so have created an exciting new story.

We meet Oz, a bouncer who wakes up from what seemingly is a fantastic dream, as we are introduced to his seemingly ordinary life, whom he shares with his girlfriend, Penny.  Everything changes one night, when a something ungodly destroys the club where he works at, and he is introduced to a world, he never knew before, the world of Loa. As Oz defeats the monster, he finds out that there is more to him than a mortal man, as his strength and speed are godsend. By chapter’s end, his girlfriend and friend see him through new eyes, while a stranger seems to hold all the answers.

Overall, it’s an excellent debut that introduces a brand-new hero and a world that most mortals have never seen. The story by Alika Ebomah and Andrew Harrell is action packed, dense, and smartly written. The art by Mikhail Sebastian and Hackronym is gorgeous and uses manga style art in the best way possible. Altogether, it’s an excellent comic that puts readers right in the middle of the action.

Story: Alika Ebomah and Andrew Harrell
Art: Mikhail Sebastian
and Hackronym
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Trust No Aunty

There is nothing more integral to identity than family and culture, as one informs the other and vice versa. This becomes even more complicated as you get older, as cultural norms usually embeds itself into what your family and society expect of you by a certain age for example who you spend your life with. These very cultural and familial norms are very apparent and integral to the book and movie, Crazy Rich Asians.

The movie and the book introduced the world to a place where being Asian is the majority and default. This is why a recent conversation with a friend lead to representation in the media, and with the amount of Filipinos in California. We wondered why so many movies, tv shows, and books take place in the Golden State, and how so very little of them even feature a Filipinx or any Asian for that matter? The world is as diverse as it is beautiful, so why does the media not reflect this? This is why when I heard of Maria Qamar’s Trust No Aunty, I was more than eager to leap into the many eccentricities of being a South Asian.

We find out in the introduction, that when a South Asian woman calls another woman “auntie,” it actually refers to her age and the demeanor she carries, as the book is divided into five sections, each giving tongue in cheek advice of how to deal with these overbearing women who pervade every corner of Indian culture. In the first section, “In School,” we find out just how an Indian woman becomes an “aunty,” and the many things that run through her mind., as one of the funnier vignettes, breaks down five different typical American high school experiences that would traumatize the typical Desi teen, one of them being picking a Halloween outfit. In “Professional Life,” gets into the professional Indian woman that you typically find in the workplace, one either belittles you or gives you much unsolicited advice about making in the working world. In “Love Shove,” Qamar dives into the pressures a Desi woman face in finding a man and getting married, one of the more interesting sections being the types of men that most Indian women encounter. In “Beauty, Body and Color,” the reader gets a rare insight into how Indian culture is obsessed with beauty as the gossip laden section that covers coconut oil, feels like it should in just about any health magazine. In “Domestic Skills That Pay The Bills,” Qamar dips into India’s love affair with food. In the last section, “Life, Style & Life-Style,” we get a quick and dirty guide into fashion within Desi culture.

Overall, an excellent book that is both funny and subversive and give outsiders a rare look into Desi culture. The stories by Maria Qamar are funny, realistic, and irreverent. The art by Qamar is beautiful. Altogether, an excellent graphic novel which will give readers a true appreciation of Indian culture.

Story: Maria Qamar Art: Maria Qamar
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Deogratias: A Tale of Rwanda

The 2000 winner of the Goscinny Prize for outstanding graphic novel script, Deogratias: A Tale of Rwanda is by J.P. Stassen and explores the genocide and atrocities committed in the country involving the Hutu and Tutsi.

First Second has reissued the graphic novel in a beautiful printing that hides the horrors within.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

First Second provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Form of a Question

This graphic memoir follows one man’s obsession with being a contestant on Jeopardy! and shows that even when someone wins, they can also lose.

Published by Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios, Form of a Question is written by Andrew J. Rostan with art by Kate Kasenow.

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores on November 20! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

BOOM! Studios provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Preview: Enola Holmes: The Case of the Missing Marquess

Enola Holmes: The Case of the Missing Marquess

Serena Blasco & Nancy Springer (w) • Serena Blasco (a & c)

A graphic novel adaptation of Nancy Springer’s bestselling mystery series about Sherlock Holmes’ resourceful younger sister!

Raised by her mother on the family’s country manor, Enola wakes on her 14th birthday to discover that her mother has disappeared, leaving only a collection of flowers and a coded message book. With Sherlock and Mycroft determined to ship her off to a boarding school, Enola escapes, displaying a cleverness that impresses even the elder Holmeses. But nothing prepares her for what lies ahead. This delightfully drawn graphic novel adaptation also includes a portfolio of pages from Enola’s secret notebook.

HC • FC • $14.99 • 64 pages • 8 ½” x 11” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-336-0

Preview: The Kingdom of the Dwarfs

The Kingdom of the Dwarfs

Robb Walsh (w) • David Wenzel (a & c)

A lavishly illustrated journey into the world of legend’s most elusive people in the tradition of J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. An extraordinary exploration of a remarkable civilization that will enchant and enthrall all who delve into its pages.

A recently discovered archaeological find provides a wealth of knowledge on the heretofore unknown life and habits of Dwarfs in all their day-to-day activities. Close examination is provided of their lives in everything from metalworking technologies to constructing underground dwellings and tunnels. Additionally, insight is offered into the general hierarchy of the population, from lowly laborers to their kings and ruling class.

HC • FC • $29.99 • 192 pages • 8-1/2” x 11” • ISBN: 978-1-68405-323-0

Review: Mandela and the General

Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid hero and first leader of the new South Africa, is an international symbol of the power of a popular movement to fight structural racism. But his fight for democracy almost spiraled into an all-out race war. Knowing he couldn’t avert a bloodbath on his own, he reached out to General Constand Viljoen, the former chief of apartheid South Africa’s military.

This graphic novel chronicles the struggle of transition of South African from the apartheid state to the democracy of today and the men who avoided war to do so.

With today’s reality this graphic novel by John Carlin and Oriol Malet is more interesting now than ever.

Get your copy in comic shops and book stores today. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

The Unknown Anti-War Comics, Out this January

The world is now marking the 100th anniversary of the Armistice of World War I, “The War to End All Wars” that brought the cry, “Never Again!” Nearly four decades later, Never Again was a rare two-issue anti-war comic book with a host – a WWI doughboy referred to as The Unknown Soldier – who told gripping war stories with a strong anti-war stance.

The comics from Never Again and other arcane historical comic book sources are carefully restored and showcased in an important new book, The Unknown Anti-War Comics. An action-oriented medium, comics have long used wars – real and fictional – as narrative fodder, often with a strong message attached. Buried in the comics published during the Cold War were powerful combat, fantasy, and sci-fi stories that strongly condemned war and nuclear weapons, boldly calling for peace.

The Unknown Anti-War Comics features the art of Steve Ditko and leads off with two noteworthy introductions. The first introduction is a comic story created especially for the collection by Nate Powell, artist of the National Book Award-Winning March books about Civil Rights leader John Lewis. The second introduction is by Noel Paul Stookey, activist and singer/songwriter of Peter, Paul, and Mary fame.

The 224-page book’s artful advocacy of peace is as important as ever in a world still embroiled in war.

The Unknown Anti-War Comics is edited by Craig Yoe, multiple Eisner Award winner, Mobius winner, and recipient of the Gold Medal from the Society of Illustrators. Now available for pre-order via online booksellers and comic book specialty retailers, The Unknown Anti-War Comics is slated for release in January.

The Jekyll Island Chronicles Helps Raise Money to Complete the National WWI Memorial

With its second volume landing in bookstores everywhere this week, The Jekyll Island Chronicles is an award-winning series of alternate-history graphic novels, featuring an unlikely band of World War I veterans who continue to serve their country by battling an anarchist cabal in a post-war era of invention.

On the centennial of the end of that war, the creators and publishers of the series have prepared a very special way for readers to join in honoring the heroes of “The Great War.”

Through the end of 2018, a portion of every purchase of The Jekyll Island Chronicles, whether in print or digital, will go toward helping complete the National WWI Memorial in Washington, DC.

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