Tag Archives: giulia brusco

We Take a Ride with Chip Mosher to Talk Blacking Out

Blacking Out

Comics industry veteran Chip Mosher and legendary artist Peter Krause have launched the Kickstarter for Blacking Out, a 56-page graphic novel presented in the hardcover European album format. Colorist Giulia Brusco, letterer Ed Dukeshire, and designer Tom Muller join the pair in this sucker-punch tale of a disgraced ex-cop, Conrad, unraveling an unsolved murder during Southern California’s fire season. 

In Blacking Out, Conrad follows a lone clue—a discarded crucifix—to unravel the death of Karen Littleton, whose body was found amid a blaze that scorched 10,000 acres. Conrad’s search leads him to clash with the victim’s father and prime suspect, Robert Littleton, as well as hostile former colleagues on the local police force. All the while, Conrad combats his alcoholism and fading faculties.

We got a chance to talk to Mosher about the comic, how his career influenced the release, and how you need to trust your collaborators. You have about one day to back the Kickstarter.

Graphic Policy: The comic has been worked on for four years, since 2016…

Chip Mosher: Yeah, the final version of it.

GP: I know you’re a fan of noir and crime stories but where did the idea for this comic come from?

CM: When I moved to California, about 20 years ago, I was struck by a lot of different things. The difference between growing up in Texas, where you have hurricanes and tornadoes. Everyone was freaking out at how I was going to deal with the earthquakes. I moved out and there was a 6.0 earthquake and I looked out at the palm trees swaying and the pool waves. Then I moved out here and the real thing is the fire season. Being a crime fan, there’s no real great story about crime and fire. I wanted to do something with that. There was a fire on 5, so I got in my car and took my camera to take some pictures. I wanted to take photos of the post-apocalyptic beauty. After a few hours of doing that, much longer than I should have, the story hit me like a ton of bricks and it went from there.

Blacking Out

GP: The town that it takes place in is a small town and it reminds me more of small town middle America than California…

CM: The thing about growing up in Texas, especially Houston, there are more miles of freeways in Houston than there is in Los Angeles. I grew up loving to drive and exploring. There are tons of towns like Edendale around the greater LA area and San Diego. I envision it like that area with a bunch of small towns with long stretches of nothing in between.

GP: The town and the town are characters in a lot of ways. When you designed the story, how much of that is that you, and how much is the art team?

CM: The script that Peter Krause worked from initially is fairly descriptive of the places and the car. But, the photography I did, there’s a photobook at the $15 level, it’s a bunch of collages I did. I drove around Southern California. One of the characters is a mechanic the garage, so I took photos of that. Anita’s house, the bar, the liquor store, photos of the car, the look at feel is a great alchemy of my work going into Peter’s head and it coming out on the page. Some of it is what I envirioned and some of it different but very cool. I gave Peter a lot of freedom the freedom of the storytelling and the look and feel of the book.

GP: Is there anything about that particualr car that stood out or mattered? I read it and I can’t picture any other car being used. It just wouldn’t feel right.

CM: That’s a testament to Pete’s style. Pete has a love of old advertisements. I was looking through some files he shared. He found an old 70s ad for the car. I think the testament that you can’t imagine the story with any other car is Pete and Giulia Brusco who helped sell it.

GP: How did the team come together?

CM: Pete was the first domino to fall. When I decided to pull the trigger on this, I really wanted to work with someone in the deepest way. A really collaborative nature. I finally convinced Pete, he thought the story it’s way too dark for him. I approached Tom Mueller really early on and get the feel of what we were doing. I contacted Tom once Pete started working on it and I’d send Tom things periodically. Giulia is someone I’ve been a fan of for a long time. I was a fan of her work on Scalped. So I pulled her in. Ed Dukeshire is amazing. Ed was my ride or die at BOOM! Letterers these days don’t get any time to do their work.

Blacking Out

GP: You’ve been on all sides of the business.

CM: I have.

GP: Did that influence you at all? How did the story change? The presentation?

CM: I’m a little bit long in my career, though the least prolific comic creator the world has ever seen. I wanted a book I could pull off the shelf in 30 and 40 years and say “that’s great.” I’ve been lucky enough in my day job to got to France and fell in love with that European 40-page format and knew it’s what I wanted to emulate. The storytelling is different. The panels are longer the pages taller. More a widescreen format. I think I have the confidence to work with people who have great track records and tell them to take their time. I didn’t give anyone a deadline. My deadline was how long would it take? They’re professionals who deliver all the time. So I had honest conversations and being in the place I am in my life and career and have the faith it’d show in these products.

GP: Did you change anything at all with digital? It’s become a greater thing in the industry and I’ve been fascinated to see how that impacts the creative process.

CM: I find reading digital comics so easy and there are so many different ways to approach it. I’m a comiXology Guided View partisan but I don’t think there were any changes because someone was going to read it digitally.

GP: I’ve read European format and haven’t really thought if there’s a difference between that and American styles being formatted digitally. Nothing jumps out about the experience.

CM: It just works. There’s different pros and cons on the approaches and certainly optimize for digital reading but first and foremost but it’s an oversized BD book.

GP: The color reminds me a lot of 70s noir film. Did you have input?

CM: My approach is hire the right people and get out of the way. You have to trust people. If you pick the right people, it’s easy to get out of the way and let them do their best work.

Blacking Out

GP: The discarded curcifix stands out to me in the comic. It not just ties into the death of Karen but the fall of Conrad from grace. Are these things you think of as a writer?

CM: All of that is in there. I don’t want to spoil it. I picked her last name subconsciously. Her last name is Littleton, which is a reference to the Colorado town. There’s a lot of that.

GP: Same with the name of the town?

CM: Edendale was the name of Hollywood before it was called Hollywood.

GP: I don’t know that.

CM: You’re giving away my moves. There’s some subtext with the town being what Hollywood was named…

GP: Is there anything with the population of the town? Is it a random number?

CM: I forget. I might have pulled that from somewhere. There’s a bar I like in Silver Lake called Edendale. It was known as the home of the most major movie studios. I don’t want to give too much away. When I’m picking character names and titles, I always have double and triple meanings. Spoiler, if you read Left on Mission, the main character is Emma and if you listen to the Hot Chocolate song, it’ll spoil the whole story for you. Recorded by Sisters of Mercy.

GP: I don’t think I know that song.

CM: It’s a great song.

GP: I’ll have to check it out. Thanks for chatting and looking forward to getting the book in my hands.

Review: Goodnight Paradise

VENICE BEACH, CALIFORNIA
SUN. SURF. SEX. MONEY. MURDER.

After finding the body of a murdered teenage runaway, a homeless man vows to bring her killer to justice.

Writer: Joshua Dysart (Unknown Soldier, B.P.R.D.)
Artist: Alberto Ponticelli (The Dark Knight, Unknown Soldier)
Color Artist: Giulia Brusco (Django Unchained, Scalped)
Letterer: Steve Wands (Batman, Descender)

Order yours now!

AHOY Comics Announces a New Way of Comics Starting in April

In 2018, upstart comics publisher AHOY Comics told us to “expect more” from our comics. They delivered exactly that with four acclaimed comics that blended comics with magazines delivering full length comic stories, prose, poetry, and cartoons from more than seventy artists and writers.

The publisher has announced a second wave of releases starting in April 2019 that features more of what we’ve come to expect and even a crossword puzzle!

AHOY Comics Second Wave includes:

BRONZE AGE BOOGIE

by writer Stuart Moore, artist Alberto Ponticelli and colorist Giulia Brusco, with a cover by Ponticelli and Brusco
April 3, 2019; $3.99

“From its jawdroppingly odd first page to its hilariously insane last, BRONZE AGE BOOGIE sets itself apart from every other comic in the best possible ways. I loved every insane minute of it.” — Matthew Rosenberg (Uncanny X-Men, The Punisher, 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank)

“It’s like skateboarding uncontrollably through 1970s comics with kaleidoscopes strapped to your eyes — but in a good way! I mean, I guess they could have called it SAVAGE SWORD OF THE PLANET OF THE DEADLY HANDS OF THE WORLDS ON THE LOOSE…but BRONZE AGE BOOGIE is, at the very least, shorter. Don’t miss it!”— Kurt Busiek (Astro City, Marvels)

What do you get when you combine all the best-loved comics genres of the 1970s: apes, monsters, Kung Fu, sword-and-sorcery, and cosmic adventure? You get BRONZE AGE BOOGIE, an intense, character-based action-fest with plenty of style! In this collector’s item first issue, young barbarian princess Brita Constantina finds herself battling a Martian invasion—in 1975 AD and BC! Back-feature: Meet MAJOR URSA, the first bear in space. But will he be a hero or a villain? Plus the usual assortment of AHOY text stories!

BRONZE AGE BOOGIE

PLANET OF THE NERDS

by writer Paul Constant, artists Alan Robinson and Randy Elliott, and colorist Felipe Sobreiro  with covers by David Nakayama
April 17, 2019; $3.99

“PLANET OF THE NERDS #1 captures the goofy joy of 80s classics like Revenge of the Nerds, Back To The Future, and Real Genius. Then, with the most elegant of plot twists, it updates the story for a different age. Smart, fast paced and beautifully drawn.”— Gene Ha (Mae)

“We all know that nerds won the great nerd/jock battle of the 80s, but what if a bunch of jocks were frozen in time and emerged not knowing the war was over? That’s the question PLANET OF THE NERDS asks, and the answer is, ironically, delightfully nerdy nerdy fun.”—Arthur Wyatt, (Judge Dredd)

“This is a really good bit.” — Daniel Kibblesmith (Santa’s Husband)

“AHOY’s offerings so far have been a celebration of a comic world won by all us geeks. Planet of the Nerds continues that creatively invigorating streak while also serving as a cleverly written, beautifully illustrated cautionary tale for non-comics bullies everywhere.” — Chris Ryall, President & Publisher/CCO, IDW Publishing

Three high school jocks in the 1980s are accidentally frozen by an experimental cryogenics device, only to be revived in the computer-driven, superhero movie-loving world of 2019–an era ruled by nerds! PLUS! A backup series explores the characters’ origins. EXTRA! Prose and pictures by the finest talents in and out of comics.

PLANET OF THE NERDS

HASHTAG: DANGER

by writer Tom Peyer, artist Chris Giarrusso, and covers by Richard Williams
May 1, 2019; $3.99

“HASHTAG: DANGER! is the greatest thing since sliced bread, and, as we all know, sliced bread is pretty great—vastly superior to unsliced bread which has to be pulled apart with your fist like an animal.”— Erik Larsen (Savage Dragon)

“AW YEAH, HASHTAG!” – Art Baltazar (Tiny Titans)

“AW YEAH, DANGER!” – Franco (Patrick the Wolf Boy)

Exploding from the pages of High Heaven, three scientific adventurers face strange creatures, lost civilizations, and supernatural threats–when they’re not too busy being complete jerks to each other. PLUS! Follow the depressing misadventures of Snelson, an over-the-hill comedian who peaked in the 90s. EXTRA! Pics, prose, and possibly poems!

Painted cover by Richard Williams (MAD, EDGAR ALLAN POE’S SNIFTER OF TERROR)

HASHTAG: DANGER

STEEL CAGE

One-Shot, featuring stories by writer Mark Waid and artist Lanna Souvanny, writer Tom Peyer and artist Alan Robinson, writer Stuart Moore and artist Peter Gross; and a cover by Elsa Charretier
June 26, 2019; $3.99

Three dazzling short “pilot” stories from AHOY’s finest – and YOU get to vote on which series continues! In “Noah Zark” by Mark Waid and Lanna Souvanny, an alien boy is kidnapped into an interplanetary zoo—and becomes the protector of the animals. In “True Identity” by Tom Peyer and Alan Robinson, we learn what secret anguish drives the most beloved superhero on Earth! And Stuart Moore and Peter Gross’s “Bright Boy” tells the grim tale of the world’s smartest human—and the havoc he leaves in his wake.

STEEL CAGE

Review: Vigilante Southland

It’s Wednesday which means it’s new comic book day with new releases hitting shelves, both physical and digital, all across the world. This week we’ve got the complete Vigilante Southland!

Vigilante Southland collects the entire series by Gary Phillips, Elena Casagrande, and Giulia Brusco.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores January 30th. To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology or TFAW

 

DC Comics​ provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

Check Out Brian Williamson’s Cover for Hook Jaw #1

Titan Comics has revealed a brand-new, razor-sharp Diamond UK cover to Hook Jaw #1 by Brian Williamson.

Hitting stores in December, the five issue mini-series is written by comics fire-cracker Si Spurrier and illustrated by rising star Conor Boyle, with colors by Giulia Brusco and edited by legendary British comics editor and marine life expert artist, Steve White.

In the troubled waters off Somalia, a rag-tag group of marine scientists studying a pack of female great white sharks find themselves caught in a conflict between pirates and the might of the US Navy. But why is the CIA so interested in the work of the scientists? And just how will they face up to the shadowy terror of the legendary great white – HOOK JAW?!

The mini-series is set to be an intense modern iteration of the titular ocean predator, which debuted in legendary British comic (and forerunner to 2000ADAction #1. Initially inspired by the success of the film, JawsHook Jaw was one of many Action strips so violent it was banned from the shelves upon release!

Hook Jaw #1 will be on sale in comic stores and digital devices from December 14, 2016.

hookjaw_brian-williamson-diamond-uk-cover

Hookjaw resurfaces at Titan Comics!

Titan Comics will release a brand-new Hookjaw mini-series, the publisher announced at Friday’s San Diego Comic Con Diamond Retailer presentation.

Hitting stores in December 2016, the five issue mini-series is written by comics fire-cracker Si Spurrier and illustrated by rising star Conor Boyle, with colors by Giulia Brusco and edited by legendary British comics editor and marine life expert artist, Steve White.

The mini-series is set to be an intense modern iteration of the titular ocean predator, which debuted in legendary British comic (and forerunner to 2000AD) Action #1. Initially inspired by the success of the film, Jaws, Hookjaw was one of many Action strips so violent it was banned from the shelves upon release!

As the series synopsis indicates, this creative team are pushing this new iteration into completely uncharted water.

Off the coast of Somalia, a rag-tag group of marine scientists are studying the Virgin Brides, a pack of female great white. What secrets are laying at the bottom of the Indian Ocean? And just how will they face up to the shadowy terror of the legendary great white – HOOKJAW?!

Hookjaw #1 will be on sale in comic stores and digital devices from December 2016.

Hookjaw Cover A - Conor Boyle Hookjaw Preview Art - Conor Boyle

Crime Novelist Gary Phillips takes on The Vigilante: Southland in October

The spirits of Greg Saunders and Adrian Chase are alive and well at DC, but instead of the open prairie or the skyscrapers of Manhattan, the next Vigilante will be battling crime on the seedy backstreets of Los Angeles, as DC Entertainment has announced The Vigilante: Southland, a six-issue miniseries written by Gary Phillips with pencils and inks by Elena Casagrande, colors by Giulia Brusco and covers by Mitch Gerads, will be hitting comic retailers October 5.

In the announcement and release, DC Entertainment Co-Publisher Dan DiDio said that “this take on Vigilante incorporates current social and political issues.”

Phillips in the release said the series is “…relevant to our times. It’s a politically tinged story that touches on a myriad of contemporary issues, such as gun violence, class struggle and Black Lives Matter. The book also provides me an opportunity to contemporize classic issues/tropes, like the fight over water rights in Southern California. I’m very excited to show readers this character, reimagined for the 21st century.”

The Vigilante: Southland is the story of Donny Fairchild, a failed NBA player who’s just making ends meet as a maintenance man. When his girlfriend stumbles on a conspiracy to steal water rights through a series of shady land-development deals, she’s mysteriously murdered. Once Donny starts getting too close to the cause of her death, his house is blown up and he’s left for dead. Determined to bring the killers to justice, Donny undergoes training from an urban legend known as the Eastsider to become a masked vigilante.

The Vigilante: Southland #1 arrives at comic retailers on October 5.