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Power Rangers meets Aliens in Unborn from Frank Gogol, Ev Cantada, and Source Point Press

Source Point Press is proud to bring Unborn – the newest title from Frank Gogol and Ev Cantada – to worldwide distribution this September. In Unborn, Power Rangers meets Alien in a hybrid sci-fi actioner injected with Gogol’s signature human intrigue.

On a strange world, five explorers mine for super fuels in a last-ditch effort to save a collapsing Earth, but the mission goes to hell when they are overrun by a hostile alien species. With humanity’s survival hanging in the balance, the crew must eradicate the deadly horde and salvage the mission. But what if the monsters aren’t the only things they have to worry about? What if the most dangerous threat facing the crew is each other?

Unborn is written by Gogol, with art by Ev Cantada, covers by Maan House, Simone Ragazonni, and Ivan Tao, and letters by Sean Rinehart.

Unborn will be available in comic shops and online at sourcepointpress.com on Wednesday, Sept. 29, 2021.

Unborn #1

Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1 Sells Out and Gets a New Printing

BOOM! Studios announced today that the new oversized special issue, Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1, from rising star writer Frank Gogol, acclaimed artist Simone Ragazzoni, colorist Igor Monti, and letterer Ed Dukeshire present the first full appearance of the Phantom Ranger in a story that will ripple through the Power Rangers franchise, has sold out at the distributor level the week of release!

In response to the overwhelming support from retailers and fans, BOOM! Studios has announced Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1 Second Printing, featuring brand new cover art by series artist Simone Ragazzoni and available in stores July 28, 2021.

ENTER THE PHANTOM RANGER! Answering Zordon’s call, the Phantom Ranger investigates the aftermath of an Empyreal attack. Only to discover their connection to an ancient evil he encountered long ago… which may have finally returned to threaten the entire universe.

POWER RANGERS UNLIMITED: EDGE OF DARKNESS #1 SECOND PRINTING

Preview: Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1

Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1

(W) Frank Gogol (A) Simone Ragazzoni (CA) Dan Mora
In Shops: Jun 30, 2021
SRP: $7.99

Answering Zordon’s call, the Phantom Ranger investigates the aftermath of an Empyreal attack.

Only to discover their connection to an ancient evil he encountered long ago… which may have finally returned to threaten the entire universe.

Rising star Frank Gogol (Dead End Kids) and artist Simone Ragazzoni (Power Rangers: Drakkon New Dawn) present the first full appearance of the Phantom Ranger in a story that will ripple through the Power Rangers franchise.

Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1

Your First Look at the Phantom Ranger in Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1

BOOM! Studios has revealed a first look at a new oversized special issue, Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1, from rising star writer Frank Gogol, acclaimed artist Simone Ragazzoni, colorist Igor Monti, and letterer Ed Dukeshire present the first full appearance of the Phantom Ranger in a story that will ripple through the Power Rangers franchise, on June 30, 2021.

ENTER THE PHANTOM RANGER! Answering Zordon’s call, the Phantom Ranger investigates the aftermath of an Empyreal attack. Only to discover their connection to an ancient evil he encountered long ago… which may have finally returned to threaten the entire universe.

Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1 features main cover art by Dan Mora and variant cover art by illustrators Junggeun Yoon, Vincenzo Riccardi, and Derrick Chew.

Power Rangers Unlimited: Edge of Darkness #1

Preview: Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1 (of 4)

Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1 (of 4)

(W) Frank Gogol (A) Nenad Cvitcanin (CA) Criss Madd
In Shops: Jan 27, 2021
SRP: $3.99

Seven years after the deadly events of September 11th, three teens struggle with the long-term fallout of that tragic day. But these former friends are brought back together when they find themselves in the crosshairs of a local drug dealer who’s out for blood. Can they put their personal traumas aside long enough to work together and survive? No Heroine’s Frank Gogol re-teams with Nenad Cviticanin for an all-new entry in the Dead End Kids saga.

Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1 (of 4)

Dead End Kids Return for The Suburban Job

The creative team behind the critically acclaimed series Dead End Kids return for another exciting entry in the series, The Suburban Job. Featuring an all-new cast of characters, Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1 is available to pre-order now and will be in shops Wednesday, Jan. 27.

At the core of Dead End Kids is the concept of childhood trauma and how it affects people as they get older. The Suburban Job explores a trauma shared by every American, and the particular effect that event had on those who were children at the time.

Seven years after the events of September 11th, three teens struggle with the long-term fallout of that tragic day. But these former friends are brought back together when they find themselves in the cross hairs of a local drug dealer who’s out for blood. Can they put their personal traumas aside long enough to work together and survive? No Heroine’s Frank Gogol reteams with Nenad Cviticanin for an all-new entry in the Dead End Kids saga.

Dead End Kids: The Suburban Job #1

Review: No Heroine #3

No Heroine #3

In No Heroine #3, Kayla is still dealing with vampires. Now, the vamps are throwing out all the stops to try and get her to leave them alone. All the while, Kayla is dealing with a loss so huge it sends her spiraling down the wrong path.

There are some details to Frank Gogol‘s writing that really stand out. In a story that delves into the supernatural, the real villain is the addiction that Kayla seems unable to shake.  It’s all done in a manner that doesn’t make light of such a topic. I think Gogol is able to bring that out in a way that a lot of writers aren’t capable of. The flip side is there are moments with the character that I don’t want to spoil with the review that came off disappointing and I’ll leave it at that.

Criss and Shawna Madd handle the visuals on No Heroine. They work well enough together but as far as their style, it’s not quite my cup of tea. It’s just a hair inconsistent to me. There were times when the art and colors popped and there were times when I would look at some panels and feel a bit more work was needed. It’s not all negative. Ahmed Raafat delivers another great-looking cover that’s sure to help get eyes on this book.

No Heroine #3 finishes as a fairly decent Vampire story that has that added layer with the addiction problems that the heroine Kayla is dealing with. While the story didn’t blow my socks off, I felt that it was a good read and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a horror story that’s a bit off the beaten path. I wish the art grabbed me a bit more as I didn’t love the overall appearance but with that said, it wasn’t enough to make me dislike No Heroine.

Story: Frank Gogol Artist: Criss Madd
Colorist: Shawna Madd Letterer: Sean Rinehart Cover Art: Ahmed Raafat
Story: 7.0 Art: 5.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Worth a read.

Source Point Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comixologyTFAWSource Point Press

Review: No Heroine #1

source point press, no heroine, featured, comic books, comics, frank gogol, criss madd, shawna madd, sean rineheart,

The concept of a comic that explores addiction and vampires is an interesting one with a lot of potential. No Heroine #1 focuses on Kayla an addict who’s searching for her boyfriend who may be using again. Her journey has her diving into the world of vampires who apparently exist in this world and in this case, are a gang of drug dealers.

Writer Frank Gogol delivers a spin on the vampire slayer archetype and like so many of the stories the heroine in this case is able to dispatch vampires with ease. It’s an interesting concept for a comic that doesn’t explore the things that make it interesting. The title, No Heroine, is a clever play on words. Kayla is both the heroine and a user of heroin (I assume, her addiction is never really fully explained). She’s clean and sober now and with sobriety comes amazing abilities?

No Heroine #1 explores the surface of the series concept. There’s a lot of potential in the ideas within. The concept of addiction and vampirism are something worth exploring together. How far someone is willing to go to get their drug is another? And, someone attempting to stay clean while having to explore within a world where that’s difficult is yet another concept worthy of a story. Any of these things would make a must-read comic. But, we instead get a copy Buffy the Vampire Slayer and a not as sunny main character.

There’s also not enough depth explored in the concepts. Kayla is looking for her boyfriend Sid. What happens to Sid just… happens. We don’t really get a sense as to why he goes from point A to point C, he just does. Kayla too is able to dispatch vampires without issue which has you wondering why others don’t? And Kayla’s sobriety too is teased and the reader is left with potentially the most interesting aspect about the character to hopefully be explored in another issue.

The art by Criss Madd with color by Shawna Madd is ok. The designs feel a bit cartoonish and personal taste may be where it all comes down. There’s a certain lack of consistency for me in the character depictions with different angles of a face not quite lining up to be the same face. They’re off just a bit. The coloring to is a bit bright for the comic betraying the dark nature of the subject matter. It’s a style that would work better for a comedy than a story about addiction that features vampires.

No Heroine #1 has a lot of good concepts and ideas but the most interesting aspects of the comic are left to the side. We get a fairly cookie-cutter story of a heroine who can kick vampire ass. There’s potential in even that but by the end of the comic we’re left with a story that feels like it’s been done and nothing to make it really stand out from the (vampire) pack.

Story: Frank Gogol Art: Criss Madd
Color: Shawna Madd Letterer: Sean Rineheart
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Graphic Policy was provided with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dead End Kids #1

Dead End Kids #1

It’s 1999. Ben, Murphy, Tank, and Amanda are four screwed-up kids from broken homes… but they have had each other. When Ben is murdered, Murphy and his friends set out to find who killed him. They find themselves in the cross-hairs! Dead End Kids #1 is a debut that evokes the long string of coming-of-age tales that have come before. It does it with a whodunnit spin that leaves you guessing.

Written by Frank Gogol, the coming-of-age tale is a solid entry into the genre. It doesn’t bring together the misfits as it does the kids who all have trauma in their lives. Issues at home seem to drive their friendship and it brings you into the story.

It’s easy to relate to the kids. The comic deftly introduces each character and gives you an idea of what’s affecting them. Gogol intelligently uses a mix of dialogue, visuals, and body language to really suck you in. And then the murder and mystery hit. And, there’s more than enough left out there to make you wonder who really is the murderer… if anyone is.

Nenad Cviticanin‘s art is solid and there’s solid work in making everyone unique and there’s more than enough detail to add depth that the dialogue doesn’t. Small details like a beer can or clothing adds to the story and helps explain the world we’re drawn in to.

Dead End Kids #1 is a solid introduction into a genre and evokes films like IT or Stand By Me in the characters and tone of it all. A good debut that’ll have you really wondering who would murder a child and wanting to find out more and solve this mystery.

Story: Frank Gogol Art: Nenad Cviticanin Letterer: Sean Rinehart
Story: 7.9 Art: 7.9 Overall: 7.9 Recommendation: Buy

Source Point Press provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Frank Gogol Talks Comics, Kickstarter, and Grief

GriefIt’s not likely that Frank Gogol (The Comic Jam) is very different than you. He loves comic books, he’s known his share of tragedy in life. Like many of us, he has a love for writing, too. However, unlike many of us, Gogol has taken the numerous sorrows of his past and put them into comics. His new book Grief deals with the tragedy and loss he’s experienced in a relatively short life in ways that are fresh, varied and engaging.

In an effort to further pursue his dream, he launched a Kickstarter this week that you can view by click here. He took a moment to discuss the writing process, his inspiration and what has guided him during this time.

Graphic Policy: Grief draws a great deal from your personal tragedies in life. How long have you been writing these stories?

Frank Gogol: I feel like I’ve been writing these stories all my life, but the truth is I finished the first script, which was for the story “Embrace” in March of last year. I’ve always wanted to write comics, and had a few false starts over the years, but at the end of the 2015 I had to tell myself to commit or move on. So, I committed and signed up for the Intro to Comic Book Writing course with Comics Experience under the guidance of former Marvel and IDW editor Andy Schmidt. And it was like that class unlocked something in me. After that, the stories started to pour out and I wrote all of the stories in Grief in about six months.

grief 002GP: The stories in Grief are extremely varied in their content. Would you say this is a reflection of dealing with your singular emotional conflict in various ways? Or are each of these a catharsis of their own memories?

FG: The variety of the stories is both by design and by accident. Let me explain. When I had begun writing these stories, they were never meant to share space in any kind of collection. I had talked with Steve Orlando (Justice League of America, Supergirl) about breaking into comics, and his advice was to finish some stories, show some range, and get a portfolio in front of some editors, and so that’s what I tried to do. And it was about the time I had five or six of the stories that I started to see that, while they were incredibly different in terms of content, they did share a thematic link in that they were all about characters that were grieving. So, I ran with that and started crafting the next few stories to fit that thematic through-line.

The stories themselves, for the most part, deal with things that have happened in my or around my life. Some of them, like “Prayer” are essentially autobiographical, while others like “Cassandra” were inspired by events I witnessed and tied to stuff that was going on in my life. All of these stories, though, are cathartic. Stories and storytelling are how I’ve coped with and moved passed (mostly) my traumas.

GP: Drawing so much from experiences that are so tragic and yet unique to you, what do you think will appeal most to the average reader?

FG: What I think is so great about anthology-style books is that because there are a variety of stories, even if one story doesn’t speak to you, another might. There’s something for everyone. And I think that’s one of the virtues of Grief. If you don’t like stories that are dramas, there’s a couple of sci-fi stories in there for you. If you don’t like superhero stories, maybe the horror stories will be more your speed.

Grief is something that is universally experienced, so even if a reader doesn’t know first-hand what it’s like to raise an autistic son, they will understand how it feels to be frustrated or to feel like a failure.

grief 005GP: How has your life been changed as product of working through these stories?

FG: Truthfully, I think I’m in a much better place than I was before writing the stories. I had thought I had worked through a lot of the traumas in my life, but writing these stories really showed me how much further I had/have to go. I think certain terrible things we carry with us for the rest of our lives, but there’s definitely a healthy way to carry them, and I think that’s where I am now.

GP: Working with a wide variety of artists in this anthology series, how decide you assign them to each story? How much of the artist’s own personal trauma and tragedy were considered?

FG: One of the best and worst things about being a comic creator in the internet age is that you can work with virtually anyone anywhere on Earth. It’s great because you can find collaborators from different places and with different backgrounds. The downside is that it’s tougher to build relationships with your collaborators when you only ever communicate with them via email.

So, I don’t know for a fact that any of my collaborators incorporated any of what they’ve been through into their art, colors, or letters. But I am a firm believer that life experiences, good and bad, influence how creators make their art, so I’m sure that my collaborators’ experiences are there on the page.

GP: In the Kickstarter, Grief is an exclusively digital book. As a creator, where do you think the future of comics lies? Is a peaceful co-existence between physical and digital or will be left behind?

FG: I know that some people are concerned about digital coming in and replacing paper comics, but I don’t think that’s something to worry about. For me, each serves a similar, but different purpose. Paper comics are for reading, but also collecting and bagging and boarding. Digital comics, though, are for reading and re-reading. Over the last few years, especially as I’ve been studying comic writing craft, digital comics have just made more sense for me. I read comics, but I revisit the stories and study the art, so having them larger and on my computer screen really helps with that. I do still buy some paper comics, but it’s mostly writers I follow and my friends who are getting books printed. Otherwise, I stick to digital.

grief 001GP: Your Kickstarter looks amazing, by the way. Being your first, what help did you receive or what insight helped you to forge something as impressive as this?

FG: Thanks! I really was a labor of love.

If there is one person I am most indebted to for how the campaign page turned out, it’d have to be Tyler James from the ComixLaunch podcast. I started listening to ComixLaunch about a year ago, thinking that someday I’d run a Kickstarter, and the knowledge Tyler offers how Kickstarter is invaluable.

That said, many, many people helped me with getting this page right. I’m a part of a couple of online communities, and I reached out to the members of those communities often for feedback, and that was really helpful, too.

And, on top of all of that, it certainly didn’t hurt that by day I worked in marketing and have a background in graphic design.

GP: In terms of being promotion and getting the word out, as a new writer leading indie talent, I imagine it’s difficult to really get your project out there. What have been the keys to your success in that regard?

FG: That’s probably the biggest hurdle in front of any new creator. Those online communities I mentioned have been a big help with starting to build a following, though. Reddit communities and Facebook groups geared toward comic books are really great spots to share indie comics because they are extremely targeted to begin with. I think, for me, the key to getting people excited about my work has been interacting with them. It’s one thing to write a story and share it. It’s another, more powerful thing, to connect with a reader through a story.

GP: What advice would you offer to other people who are looking to get their own comic book project funded and developed?

FG: I’m not sure I have anything thing revelatory to offer that hasn’t been said before and often, but the piece of advice that really helped me was to start and finish a project. I started with very manageable 5-page stories, which allowed me to start and finish a project easily and learn the process. It’s got a domino-like effect. You finish one, and then you finish a second, and then a third, and it gets easier each time.

grief 003GP: Moving forward, do you feel Grief has helped you leave some of the heartache and pain behind you?

FG: Yes, definitely. I don’t hold it as an absolute truth, but I do think that a lot of people write because they have stuff to work through. It’s definitely true for me. Like I said earlier, some stuff we carry with us forever, but we can learn to carry it in a healthy way, and writing Grief helped me to do that with some of my traumas.

GP: What story are you working on next?

FG: I’ve got a couple of scripts ready to go right now. I’m always trying to do or learn something new when I write, so no two are the same, either. One story is Silence of the Lambs meets superheroes. Another is an all-ages story that deals with what it’s like to be adopted. There’s a third script about artificial intelligence and guilt. I’m not sure which will be next just yet, but I do know I have a lot of stories to tell still. Right now, I’m focusing on making sure the Grief Kickstarter campaign is a success and offers backers a lot of value.

 

You can check out the Grief Kickstarter here.

Patrick Healy is a writer/artist who makes pins and chews bubble gum. He has ample amounts of both. But you can find his pins here.

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