Tag Archives: drawn & quarterly

Small Press Expo 2019 Announces Comics Debuting at the Show

Small Press Expo has announced that over 100 books and comics will debut at the 2019 festival. The festival takes place on Saturday and Sunday, September 14-15, at the Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center and will have over 650 creators, 280 exhibitor tables, 22 programming panels, and 14 hands-on workshops to introduce attendees to the amazing world of independent and small press comics.

A complete list of debuts, including cover images and publishing information, can be found on the SPX web site.

Check out some of books debuting this year:

Rusty Brown

Chris Ware’s Rusty Brown is a fully interactive, full-color articulation of the time-space interrelationships of a couple people in the first half of a single midwestern American day and the tiny piece of human grit about which they involuntarily orbit. Published by Pantheon.

Rusty Brown

CosmoKnights

For Hannah Templer’s ragtag band of space gays, liberation means beating the patriarchy at its own game.

In CosmoKnights, Pan’s life used to be very small. Work in her dad’s body shop, sneak out with her friend Tara to go dancing, and watch the skies for freighter ships. On the run and off the galactic grid, Pan discovers the astonishing secrets of her neo-medieval world… and the intoxicating possibility of burning it all down. Published by Top Shelf.

CosmoKnights

The Hard Tomorrow

Told with tenderness and care in an undefined near future, Eleanor Davis’s The Hard Tomorrow blazes unrestrained, as moments of human connection are doused in fear and threats. Her astute projections probe at current anxieties in a cautionary tale that begs the question: What will happen after tomorrow? Published by Drawn & Quarterly.

The Hard Tomorrow

Twice Shy

Joel Orff’sTwice Shy tells the story of two strangers who have shut themselves down emotionally as a way to cope with their lives. Bob is an artist with a creative block who loses himself in an aimless existence; while Casey suffers from deep-seated anxiety and feelings of abandonment. As they tentatively try to build a life together, the harsh realities of the outside world begin to intrude on their happiness, but the experience changes them both in fundamental ways. Published By Alternative Comics.

Twice Shy

Sports Is Hell

For Ben Passmore, some wars are for religion and some are for political belief, but this one is for football. After her city wins the Super Bowl for the first time, Tea is separated from her friend during a riot and joins a small clique fighting its way through armed groups of football fanatics to meet a star receiver that just might end the civil war or become the city’s new oppressive leader. Published by Koyama Press.

Sports Is Hell

The Breakaways

Cathy G. Johnson’sThe Breakaways is a middle-grade graphic novel about a rebellious girls’ soccer team. It is a portrait of friendship in its many forms, and a raw and beautifully honest look into the lives of a diverse and defiantly independent group of kids learning to make room for themselves in the world. Published by First Second.

The Breakaways

So Buttons #10

How does Jonathan Baylis celebrate his 10th-anniversary issue of So Buttons? With friends of course! This all-new issue features cover art by Thomas Boatwright in tribute to Jim Aparo’s cover for Detective Comics #469 (my first Batman comic). It includes new, funny toddler stories by Summer Pierre, heartwarming tributes to my passed dog Mocha by Haley Boros and New Yorker cartoonist Emily Flake. Plus art & stories by T.J. Hirsch, Princess Pamela, Nicole Miles, Jeremy Nguyen and Paul Westover. Published by Jonathan Baylis.

So Buttons #10

Henni In the Lowlands

Miss-Lasko Gross’Henni In The Lowlands continues the heroines adventures as an anti-authoritarian protagonist in this special edition only available at SPX 2019. Self-published.

Henni In the Lowlands

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Doctor Mirage #1

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Absolute Carnage #2/Absolute Carnage: Lethal Protectors #1/Absolute Carnage: Miles Morales #1/Venom #17 (Marvel) – Events often don’t live up to the hype but “Absolute Carnage” has delivered so far. There’s only been good to great so far so we’re all in until we see otherwise.

Batman/Superman #1 (DC Comics) – The Batman Who Laughs has poisoned superheroes and this classic team-up returns to deal with it. The next chapter in an epic tale.

Doctor Mirage #1 (Valiant) – How do you solve the case of your own death? That concept is too cool to not check out.

Grass (Drawn & Quarterly) – An anti-war graphic novel about a Korean girl forced into sexual slavery for the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II.

House of X #3 (Marvel) – The big picture is finally revealed and Hickman isn’t giving us a restart of the X-Universe but delivering the next major event.

Killers #2 (Valiant) – A deeper dive into Valiants “Ninja” world. It’s been cool so far adding a lot to this intriguing corner of the universe.

Knights Temporal #2 (Aftershock) – The first issue was really intriguing with a knight transported to modern times. The details are still a mystery but it’s a mystery we’re intrigued by.

Mall #1 (Vault Comics) – The Mall isn’t just a bunch of stores, this consumeristic mecca is filled with tribes and name brand gangs!

Manor Black #2 (Dark Horse) – If you read the first issue, you know why this is on the list. The comic is a mix of horror and superheroes and we’re intrigued to see where it all goes.

Marvel Comics #1000 (Marvel) – We’ve read this one and it’s an intriguing celebration of Marvel’s 80 years.

Mountainhead #1

Mountainhead #1 (IDW Publishing) – A father and son are nomads who think the government is after them. A lone survivor of a climbing expedition is covered in blood. The two will collide in this intriguing debut.

Power Pack: Grow Up #1 (Marvel) – Louise Simonson and June Brigman return to the beloved characters to celebrate 80 years of Marvel.

Red Winter #2 (Scout Comics) – The first issue was solid gritty crime/noir and we’re all in for the second issue.

Stalingrad: Letters from the Volga (Dead Reckoning) – Exploring the bloodiest battle of World War II.

Tommy Gun Wizards #1 (Dark Horse) – An alternate history where Eliot Ness is after Al Capone who’s dealing in magic.

Review: Hot Comb

Hot Comb

Growing up around Black women, my whole life, I know that their relationship to their hair is like no other. This is not to say every woman feels a certain way about their hair. This is different for Black Women. The kinship is almost mystical even ethereal in some instances. As I’ve gotten older, the women in my family, especially my daughters, made me comprehend that it’s much more profound than synergy but an intimate fragment of their individuality.

Their hair is tethered to memories and for most Black women it’s the first time they felt being seen. Never mind the fact that people of color are marginalized in just about every part of the world, but more so women of color, especially Black Women. This is why their hair, like Samson, is where they draw their power from. In Ebony Flowers’ moving Hot Comb, we get several stories of Black women and their bond to their hair.

In the titular story, we follow a young woman as she goes to a salon to get her very first perm, with her mother in tow, as her need to get one is tied to the fact that her identity gets challenged by her contemporaries about her appearance, that her hair is nappy,  her family on her behavior , especially her mother who accuses her of  acting too white, which leads her to this place,  in hope of getting some reprieve from getting teased, through getting a perm in a black salon , which is more than she ever expected and more painful than she never knew until her scalp started to heat up, and only after she gets her perm, she realizes soon enough you cannot please everyone no matter what you do.

In “Lady On the Train,” a stranger asks a young lady, while on a train, some of the ignorant questions black women every day must endure while wearing her hair wrapped.

In “Big Ma,” a young girl’s favorite memories are tied to her grandmother whose love for her children outweighed her own welfare, something that those around her wished they did not take for granted.

In “Fieldwork Follies,” a familiar scene plays out where a young Black girl’s white friend, initially realizes their physiological differences, and in a moment of understanding, she offers her friend to touch her hair.

In “My Lil Sister Lena,” a melancholic anecdote about a young Black female baseball player who during one day at their hotel pool, her teammates, at first , in jest, and in due course almost mean-spiritedly,  pointing  out how unique her hair is, often touching without really asking,  eventually causing her to have anxiety, leading her to pull her hair out, as a slow devolution of her psyche makes her stop caring about everything she loves in life.

In “The Spaniard,” a young man’s seemingly innocent compliment unearths a deep seeded ignorance he has for Black women as a whole.

In “Sisters & Daughters,” a woman ‘s relationship with her daughter and her sister is shaped by her own struggles of growing up in a broken home which she explores while her sister does her hair.

In “Last Angolan Saturday,” three friends on their last weekend in Angola, bond over memories, hair, and their connection to the land they stand on.

Overall, an honest assemblage of stories and narratives that elaborates and celebrates the legendary connection of Black women and their hair and ultimately paints the struggle that they endure, sometimes heartbreakingly so, in their most delicate moments. The stories by Flowers, is propitious, gifted and masterfully told. The art by Flowers, is sophisticated and rich in broad strokes. Altogether, a tome that will inoculate compassion and understanding into most readers even when the world resists the need to celebrate our differences.

Story: Ebony Flowers Art: Ebony Flowers
Story: 10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Asgardians of the Galaxy #1 (Marvel) – A tie-in to the current Infinity Wars event, this comic brings together a rag-tag group of Asgardian warriors. The reason is ok but it’s the personalities and a reveal at the end that’s the real driver here.

Berlin The Complete Edition (Drawn & Quarterly) – Collecting Jason Lutes masterwork looking at the fall of the Weimar Republic through the eyes of its citizens. It’s a society slowly awakening to the stranglehold of fascism.

Border Town #1 (Vertigo/DC Comics) – Kicking off the new direction of Vertigo that’s a return to the edgy social conscious comics of old. The first issue is absolutely fantastic and a must get. A horror comic with monsters you don’t normally see.

Bully Wars #1 (Image Comics) – A new series from Skottie Young. That alone has us sold. The series focuses on high school bullies with art by Aaron Conley.

Captain America #3 (Marvel) – A fantastic relaunch of the series focused on the role of Captain America in modern society.

Cover #1 (Jinxworld/DC Comics) – The fact this is a new Jinxworld title has us intrigued to check it out.

Dark Ark #10 (AfterShock Comics) – Cullen Bunn is a master at horror and this series mashes that genre up with the Bible. So good.

Death of the Inhumans #3 (Marvel) – We admit we were skeptical when we first head about this miniseries but so far each issue has been solid with no issues murdering off long time characters and creating a threat that feels very real.

Dr. Stone Vol. 1 (VIZ Media) – We’ve read it, we love it. Basically, everyone in the world gets turned into stone and a few wake up thousands of years in the future. Where do you go from there?

The Dreaming #1 (Vertigo/DC Comics) – The Sandman Universe takes off with this debut issue. We had mixed feelings about the teaser comic but we’re excited to check out more.

Thanos Legacy #1 (Marvel) – A piece of the master cosmic plan Marvel has going on.

Transformers: Lost Light #23/Transformers: Optimus Prime #23/Transformers: Unicron #4 (IDW Publishing) – IDW’s Transformers universe is finally coming to an end point and these three series are taking us there. What’s on the other side, we have no idea.

United States vs Murder Inc #1 (Jinxworld/DC Comics) – We remember the first volume when it came out and it was a nice spin to the mob story.

The Walking Dead #183 (Skybound/Image Comics) – The introduction of the new community has given the series a shot in the arm and opened up a lot of posibilities. Where is it goign? We have no idea and can’t wait.

WWE NXT Takover: Blueprint #1 (BOOM! Studios) – If you’re a fan of the WWE, this one is a must get.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors are choosing up to five books and why they’re choosing the books. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Elana

4 Kids Walk Into A Bank issue #5 (Black Mask Studios) – One of the best mini series around, 4 Kids reaches its conclusion. If you want a Stranger Things or Stand By Me type story with an incredibly well written girl protagonist and wise humor this series is for you. Read my review of issues 1-3.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Astonishing X-Men #3 (Marvel) – This X title hit the ground running in the first issue, and shows no signs of letting up. This book has a very interesting group of X-Men making up the team, many I’m happy to see in a team book again. The action is non stop, the writing is really good and one surprise already caught me off guard, so I’m really looking forward to see what else his book is going to throw at me.

Champions #12 (Marvel) – It’s no surprise to anyone following the site that this is one of my favorite titles right now, and I’m really looking forward to this issue and seeing where the team is post Secret Empire. The solicit is promising a change to the line up, and while I do welcome change, I’m a little nervous how a change to the team could change the dynamic and the overall feel of the book. But, I’m optimistic and can’t wait to find out.

Jessica Jones #12 (Marvel) – Being one of my favorite characters (before Netflix and it was cool to be a fan of Jessica’s) I am really enjoying this title. I can’t wait for Maria Hill’s secrets to come to light and how Jessica will react, and how these revelations will shake up Jessica’s world.

 

Javier

Top Pick: World Reader #6 (Aftershock Comics) – I first came across Loveness’ writing in Marvel’s Rocket Racoon & Groot. It was one of the best emotional reads I have had in a while. Since then, if he writes it, I buy it. In his latest work–well supported by Juan Doe’s vibrant art–he gives us more sci-fi laden empathic space travels across the universe, seeking the answers to dead worlds.

Iron Fist #7 (Marvel) – Everybody has been hating on Marvel lately, but they still remain one of the top players in the comic book world and attract top talent (Disney must offer a hell of a health insurance plan). A prime example is Ed Brisson taking over and bringing life back to the Iron Fist character. This latest arc teams him up with Shang-Chi Master of Kung Fu; plus Mike Perkins’, dark colored, action packed art is a visual thrill.

Doom Patrol #8 (DC’s Young Animal) – True, it’s not Grant Morrison’s DP, but Gerard Way’s new take stands on it’s own, and has enough weird to keep me coming back month after month.

Seven to Eternity #9 (Image) – This sci-fi western fantasy by Rick Remender has become one of my favorites. I miss Opena’s art, but Harren is filling in the job nicely.

Postal #22 (Image/TopCow) – Hill and Goodhart are bringing things to a head as the town folk of Eden ready themselves for all out conflict with the FBI.

 

Brett

Top Pick: Poppies of Iraq (Drawn & Quarterly) – So many good books this week, but this is the absolute top of my list. This graphic novel is Brigitte Findakly’s chronicle of her relationship with her homeland of Iraq and the history she experienced there. Can’t wait to read this and see her take.

Ab Irato #5 (Lion Forge Comics) – Lion Forge’s “Catalyst” line of comics is making headlines but this series is some of the smartest writing in comics right now looking at a political uprising from the ground perspective.

Beirut Won’t Cry (Fantagraphics Books) – An artist’s view of the summer of 2006 Israeli attack on Lebanon. While I probably won’t agree with everything said, I want to see what’s said.

Dastardly and Muttley #1 (DC Comics) – Garth Ennis taking on the classic pair. It sounds insane and I can’t wait to read it.

Lazaretto #1 (BOOM! Studios) – A pandemic strikes a dorm complex at a small college and it’s quarantined with kids trapped inside. Sounds like an amazing concept.

Drawn & Quarterly Decides to Not Publish Berliac’s Sadbøi

A few days ago Drawn & Quarterly announced that it would be publishing Sadbøi by Berliac. After becoming aware of some troubling and offensive comments the graphic novel publisher has changed their mind and announced that they would indeed not publish the publication.

In 2015 Berliac published an essay that compared “cultural appropriation and transgender people.” Drawn & Quarterly was unaware of the article and the “consequent public discussion about.”

In an apology yesterday, the company said they “do not agree with the essay, its defense, nor the tone and aggression he displayed in this and subsequent debates,” and that they did not do due diligence when deciding to work with the creator. After learning of the statements, they can no longer fully support the release and will not be publishing it.

You can read Berliac’s comments here as well as his follow up commentary about it.

Sadbøi is “seen as a statement on the treatment of immigrants—the challenge of being expected to conform to a society’s ideals in a world that prematurely condemns outsiders.”

People Over Politics: Rolling Blackouts and Refugees

A few months ago, for one of my English classes, we dove into the murky waters of refugees, examining the motive behind closing off borders and the way in which that fits or doesn’t fit American ideals (hint: I don’t think it does).  The conversation quickly became pretty heated, with most of my students arguing for letting in refugees against a few very vocal opponents. I’m not going to unearth every part of that conversation, but I do want to dust off the jewel offered by one of my students who is Muslim and has family friends that are refugees–one of those family friends had her family killed by ISIS, a long cry from being an ISIS member herself.

Throughout the course of the conversation, she focused on the idea that a conversation like this quickly unfurls into abstract language, and in doing so, we lose the thread that a conversation like this should focus on: people. We should be seeing faces instead of statistics, hearts instead of hatred.  Perhaps not surprisingly, my students who were against refugees sidestepped this question and continued to talk in generalizations, arguing in abstractions loosely connected with reality.

And perhaps this is the very reason that a graphic novel like Rolling Blackouts: Dispatches from Turkey, Syria, and Iraq exists, a non-fiction graphic novel that follows Sarah Glidden as she journeys with journalists to Turkey, Iraq and Syria to examine refugee life. Yes, it discusses refugees who fled Iran after the US invaded (running to countries like Syria and Turkey) not refugees fleeing Syria. But, the core of the book–its attempts to anchor this abstract issue with real people and stories; its examination of what journalism is and what the responsibility of journalists should be; its insight into the impact this war had on US soldiers–all of those are not only still relevant, but even more relevant than they were in the time period this non-fiction graphic novel covers. But no matter how relevant a text is, people will throw it aside if it’s not any good. Fortunately, that’s not the case: Glidden has a subtle, yet effective, sense of structure, of how much detail to include in a panel (her cartooning style is simple, warm and enormously effective), of how much exposition to give so it informs rather than weighs down the story.

rolling blackouts pic--refugees are people.jpg

The graphic novel expertly shows that refugees are people, but that doesn’t mean it glorifies them to sainthood. No, it means that it shows them with their hopes and fears, their successes and failures. For example, we visit with refugees who were formerly middle class, mainly concerned about their children’s ability to go to college and live a better life. That’s not too far from the American Dream, but then again, the US doesn’t hold a monopoly on the idea that children should become more successful than their parents. At the same time, we see refugees who harbor a lot of hatred towards the American government, although this hatred that doesn’t prevent them from dealing with Americans kindly, realizing they don’t can’t treat a person as a generalized group…if only we had the same compassion and curiosity.

rolling blackouts--regret over fleeing.jpg

If this piece of graphic journalism only concerned itself with removing the blinders that prevent people from truly seeing refugees as people, it would be a powerful work of art. But Glidden doesn’t stop there. As in the real-world, one topic can’t be separated completely from the rest: each person and event is connected by silken strands to others in the web. And it’s almost impossible to talk about refugees without talking about the role of media in their story and the role that US soldiers played in their exile. Although Glidden is not a journalist by trade, she reports these scenes with so much objectivity and emphasis on relevance that one could almost believe she is working from the same cookbook that journalists use. Glidden knows how to balance ingredients so that one taste doesn’t overpower. She knows how to make them gel into something greater than the individual parts, much like a cake is greater than an egg or butter.

rolling blackouts pic--emotions during interview.jpg

And this journalistic instinct also serves her well when turning to the subject of journalism itself.  Glidden focuses on the controversial parts of journalism–the commercialization of it as industry, the need to keep audience reaction in mind when shaping a story, the at-times naive ambitions that let journalists see themselves as an authority on objective reality. These snapshots of the challenges of journalism combine with the images of journalists acting nobly to create a collage that dazzles in its complexity.

The final piece Glidden adds to this story also creates further complexity. A US soldier who had tours in Iraq is along for the ride, giving his perspective on these issues. While he spends most of the novel touting the company line, toward the end of the work, we start to see more nuance to those feelings. But that nuance doesn’t mean the soldier switches perspectives and denounces the war. Instead, it just means that his conflicting emotions are finally brought to light without any resolution, which is more realistic than the Hollywood ending the journalists themselves might have been hoping for.

rolling blackouts pic--shape of story.jpg

With President Trump’s recent ban on refugees there has never been a better time to study this topic. And what better way to do that then with a graphic novel that is informative in its simplicity, thought-provoking in its complexity, and defiant in its belief in the human heart, whether that heart was born American or not.


This post originally appeared on CJ Standal’s blog and is reprinted here with his permission.

Review: Hostage

In the middle of the night in 1997, Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André was kidnapped by armed men and taken away to an unknown destination in the Caucasus region. For three months, André was kept handcuffed in solitary confinement, with little to survive on and almost no contact with the outside world.

Artist and writer Guy Delisle recounts André’s experience in Hostage the new graphic novel from Drawn & Quarterly that’s one of the most fascinating graphic novels I’ve read this year. Delisle recounts André’s experience in an almost 500 page book that goes over the details no matter how mundaine it may seem. And I think that’s what’s most fascinating about it all. This isn’t a story where André is being taken out and his life threatened, that experience comes from his head. Instead, the graphic novel is actually almost ordinary in a way. Day in and day out André is handcuffed in his setting given soup and bread to eat and recounting the days. How he spent the three months and what was occuring on his side is the interesting part.

This isn’t a story about negotiations and failed transfers. Instead, this story focuses on what André imagines is going on, or just straight up ponders. Why was a photo taken? Why did he have to provide a phone numbers? Telling the story only from André’s perspective provides us the reader a confinement that reflects what André experienced. For pages and pages the book devotes itself to the soup André eats and how his wrist deals with the handcuffs. Because, that’s what André experienced. We see how André stayed alert during his time, how he counted the days, and his general thoughts. In reality though, we only see and experience what André did.

Delisle conveys the psychological effects of solitary confinement, compelling us to ask ourselves some difficult questions regarding the repercussions of negotiating with kidnappers and what it really means to be free. For those in the nonprofit sector or want to see the power of graphic journalist, Hostage is a fascinating read.

But, what struck me most, and Delisle enhances with his art is how far from an action movie it all is. Seriously, I want to go pack and see how much is devoted to discussing soup. But, the way it’s all presented is in a way so that we the reader who are unfamiliar with André’s experience don’t know what’s happening next. So, through the mundane tension increases as the story goes on.

Hostage is one of the most fascinating releases this year in both its story, attention to detail, and how it’s laid out. For a slice of real life through graphic journalism, this is a must get.

Story: Guy Delisle Art: Guy Delisle
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Joe

Top Pick: Action Comics #978 (DC Comics) – This has become my favorite DC comic, and that includes Wonder Woman. Those two and Superman go back and forth as to what is currently the best out of Rebirth, but either way this book is just incredible and consistent.

The Flash #21 (DC Comics) – Wow what a start to “The Button” with who returned and then disappeared in a “flash”. Yup, I did that. I can’t wait to see where this story goes. Plus another lenticular cover!

Batman/The Shadow #1 (DC Comics/Dynamite) – Riley Rossmo! He is one of my favorite artists, and I’m so happy to see him on a bat book again, and this time he will also be drawing another legendary character.

Old Man Logan #22 (Marvel) – I thought Issue #21 wasn’t as good as I hoped, but this is one of my favorite Marvel books, and Lemire is a great writer. I have hope that this arc will be amazing.

Kill or Be Killed #8 (Image) – This is one of the best comic books out, so I recommend grabbing the issues, or at least getting it in trade. It is awesome, and just keeps getting more intense and better somehow.

 

Alex

Top Pick: X-O Manowar #2 (Valiant) – I loved this issue. I can’t wait to get this in my hands to see non-watermarked art.

Batman/The Shadow #1 (DC Comics/Dynamite) – I found out about this comic when I was looking through Previews to make this list (I tend to avoid solicitations), and I immediately got excited. I can’t wait to grab this.

Ben Reilly: The Scarlet Spider #1 (Marvel) – I’ve always been fond of the Scarlet Spider, perhaps because he was the Spider-Man when I started reading comics. You’d think I’d be looking forward to this based on the fact Ben Reilly is back, but I’m more hopeful that Kaine will return to comics, rather than Ben Reily. Yeah, I’m a Kaine fan.

Britannia: We Who Are About To Die #1 (Valiant) – Remember what I said about X-O? I can say the exact same thing here.

Old Man Logan #22 (Marvel) – I’m loving this story. Old Man Logan is revisiting his younger self through some timey-wimey mystical shit, occasionally altering certain things (possibly), but always feeling as though he’s in waaaaay over his head. It’s a brilliant arc, and one hell of an arc for Lemire to leave the series on.

 

Shay

Top Pick: Orphan Black Deviations #2 (IDW Publishing) – Send in the clones. No really , send them in. I’ve got popcorn and everything!

Top Pick: Deadpool vs Punisher #2 (Marvel) – The hits and quips keep on coming in this second installment of DvP and I can’t wait to see if this is the issue where they team up for the buddy anti-hero road trip comic we never knew we always wanted but, can’t wait to see.

Suicide Squad #16 (DC Comics) – Rob WIlliams starts the latest Suicide Squad arc “Earthlings on Fire” with a bang as Amanda Waller makes a deal with the devil (aka Lex Luthor) to fix a bigger problem while the Squad commits some B&E.

24 Legacy – Rules of Engagement #1 (IDW Publishing) – A little back story on Eric Carter the newest super operative in the 24 franchise.

Judge Dredd: Blessed Earth #1 (IDW Publishing) – He’s baccccccck!

 

Brett

Top Pick: Hostage (Drawn & Quarterly) – Guy Delisle… that alone will get me to pick this up, but the subject matter is the real draw here. Delisle’s graphic novel is about the Doctors Without Borders administrator Christophe André who was kidnapped by armed men in 1997. This book recounts his harrowing experience.

Batman/The Shadow #1 (DC Comics/Dynamite) – Scott Snyder, Steve Orlando, and Riley Rossmo… nuff said.

Hulk #5 (Marvel) – The best comic Marvel is putting out today. An absolutely fantastic look at Jen’s journey post Civil War II and the PTSD she’s experiencing due to that.

Real Science Adventures #1 (IDW Publishing) – The She-Devils get their own series and anything Atomic Robo related is a must read for me.

Smoketown #2 (Scout Comics) – The first issue was beyond amazing noir/crime. I’ve been counting down to the second one.

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Mr. H

Top Pick: Batman/TMNT Adventures #5 (IDW Publishing) – This book has just been plain all out fun! I was skeptical of the quality it would be after the last Batman/ TMNT crossover, which was good but this story so far just ninjas the previous teams ass! It takes the very best aspect of Batman: The Animated Series and melds it together in the Turtles world. Each issue is better than the previous and even though they are leaning to The Mad Hatter being the big boss behind it all, when Tetch is written correctly he is quite the villainous force. I can’t wait to see how this joyride through my childhood icons ends.

Action Comics # 976 (DC Comics) – Well here it is, the battle for Superman’s future! Can Supes defeat Myx (not spelling his damn name) and get back his family or will he lose more than he gained in the process? All I know is if Jon becomes a casualty out of it, I’m going hunting with Kryptonite bullets. Nevertheless a good twist on a classic Superman character and I am enjoying the various runs on my hero since Rebirth. Can anyone say New New 52?

Reborn #5 (Image Comics) – I have really dug this team up of Millar and Capullo thus far. I don’t think it has tremendous long term value but the short term storyline has been fantastic. The art is some of Capullo’s best and Millar’s writing is less Millar-y than usual which keeps it at a nice tempo for me. Very interesting look into the theory of reincarnation and one that wants to make sure my pet gets all the love he can get before I meet him in the afterlife. A fun ride for sure, not ready to get out of the car yet.

Iron Fist #1 (Marvel Comics) – The timing for this couldn’t be better as I have just reached the middle of my binge watching of “Iron Fist” on Netflix and I love it. My Danny Rand – ometer is at it’s peak right now so more firery chi punching for me is a must. This book is welcome, hope it meets my kung fu needs.

 

Joe

Top Pick: The Unworthy Thor #5 (Marvel) – What did he do to make him unworthy?! It seems like this is the issue where we should finally learn what was whispered into Odinson’s ear.

Action Comics #976 (DC Comics) – The end of the fantastic Superman Reborn arc! I loved this entire run so far and this arc has been so crazy it works.

Doom Patrol #5 (DC’s Young Animal) – This is one of the most fun and wacky comics out. I am obsessed with Nick Derrington’s art and wished he was drawing everything lately.

Black Hammer #7 (Dark Horse) – It has returned! One of the best comics out in the medium and written by one of my favorite writers, Jeff Lemire.

Dept. H #12 (Dark Horse) – Matt and Sharlene Kindt have been so consistently good on this book every month. I love this cover and I am excited to return to the deep and find out whodunit.

 

Alex

Top Pick: X-O Manowar #1 (Valiant) – I have the review copy sat on my desktop just waiting to be opened up and read again, but before I did that, I realized that this was honestly one of the few comics this week I’m looking forward to reading (again) when I pick it up i print so I can see the art without the watermark on it. I can’t wait to see it.

Hulk #4 (Marvel) – I read the first issue of this entirely by accident and immediately found one of my favourite new series. The tension you feel as Jen struggles to not change into the Hulk is palpable, and so well written. I don’t even need a villain in the series, I could read about Jennifer Walters living her life all day long.

 

Paul

Top Pick: Extraordinary X-Men #20 (Marvel) – The war between the X-Men and the Inhumans has come to an end, and the X-Men need to figure out their next move. I am very excited for the upcoming ‘ResurreXion’ event and looking forward to seeing the new paths the X-Men take.

Top Pick: Hulk #4 (Marvel) – This has been a great book from the start, showing that even a superhero can be shaken to their core after traumatic events.  Jen has definitely seen her share, from losing her cousin to almost dying by Thanos’ hand. This book is doing a fantastic job of showing her struggle to try and gain back her life while keeping her Hulk side at bay. If you aren’t reading this book, jump in now while it’s still early; you won’t be disappointed.

Invincible Iron Man #5 (Marvel) – I’ve been enjoying this book and getting to know Riri Williams.  It’s a fun book, seeing her being mentored by AI Tony Stark, and seeing her show him a thing or two in the process.  This issue should be fun as well, as various heroes are approaching her to join their teams but, of course, we’ll some villains tag along.  This should be fun.

Unworthy Thor #5 (Marvel) – Will Odinson just pick up the damn hammer already?!?!

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Torture Report: A Graphic Adaptation (Arcade Publishing) – On December 9, 2014, the Senate Intelligence Committee released a report condemning the CIA for its secret brutal torture during the Bush administration. This graphic novel summarizes and makes that important document understandable for individuals. The illustrations add poignancy to the facts.

The Circle #4 (Action Lab: Danger Zone) – A solid teenage horror tale that mixes fantastic art with a creepy story.

Heathen #2 (Vault Comics) – The first issue was great, the second issue is somehow better. This is a fantastic new series from a relatively new voice in comics and definitely a unique spin on things. Two words: lesbian. vikings.

Powerless #1 (Vault Comics) – Everyone has powers, but a new disease takes away those abilities. A cool concept from the upstart publisher.

Terms and Conditions (Drawn & Quarterly) – R. Sikoryak has taken the iTunes Terms and Conditions and created a word for word graphic adaptation.

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