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Preview: Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)

Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)

(W) Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing (A) Carlos Magno (CA) Mike Del Mundo (VCA) Natacha Bustosm Juan Cabal, Carmen Nunez Carnero, Joshua Cassara, Iban Coello, Patrick Gleason, Peach Momoko, Todd Nauck, R.B. Silva, Skottie Young
Rated T+
In Shops: Aug 18, 2021
SRP: $4.99

THE ORIGIN OF KANG!
The man called Kang the Conqueror has been a pharaoh, a villain, a warlord of the space ways and even, on rare occasions, a hero. Across all timelines, one fact seemed absolute: Time means nothing to Kang the Conqueror.
But the truth is more complex. Kang is caught in an endless cycle of creation and destruction dictated by time and previously unseen by any but the Conqueror himself. A cycle that could finally explain the enigma that is Kang. And a cycle that begins and ends with an old and broken Kang sending his younger self down a dark path…

Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)
Mike Del Mundo

Early Preview: Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)

Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)

(W) Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing (A) Carlos Magno (CA) Mike Del Mundo (VCA) Natacha Bustosm Juan Cabal, Carmen Nunez Carnero, Joshua Cassara, Iban Coello, Patrick Gleason, Peach Momoko, Todd Nauck, R.B. Silva, Skottie Young
Rated T+
In Shops: Aug 18, 2021
SRP: $4.99

THE ORIGIN OF KANG!
The man called Kang the Conqueror has been a pharaoh, a villain, a warlord of the space ways and even, on rare occasions, a hero. Across all timelines, one fact seemed absolute: Time means nothing to Kang the Conqueror.
But the truth is more complex. Kang is caught in an endless cycle of creation and destruction dictated by time and previously unseen by any but the Conqueror himself. A cycle that could finally explain the enigma that is Kang. And a cycle that begins and ends with an old and broken Kang sending his younger self down a dark path…

Kang the Conqueror #1 (of 5)
Mike Del Mundo

Journey Across the Timestream and Beyond in these New Kang the Conqueror #1 Covers

On August 18th, writers Collin Kelly and Jackson Lanzing team up with artist Carlos Magno, colors by Espen Grundetjern, and lettering by Joe Caramagna, to bring readers the definitive origin of one of Marvel’s most legendary villains in Kang the Conqueror #1! The new series will unravel Kang’s complex history, tying together all of his greatest stories and reuniting his alternative selves from across the timeline. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, Kang is set to begin his biggest era yet. To celebrate the character’s first-ever solo series, some of the industry’s top artists have crafted outstanding covers that showcase the past, present, and future of Kang’s incredible saga. Included in this collection are covers by all eight of Marvel’s Stormbreakers depicting key moments in Kang’s history from his iconic first run-ins with the Fantastic Four and the Avengers to his epic showdown with the Young Avengers.

The man called Kang the Conqueror has been a pharaoh, a villain, a warlord of the space ways, and even—on rare occasions—a hero. Across all timelines, one fact seemed absolute: Time means nothing to Kang the Conqueror. But the truth is more complex. Kang is caught in an endless cycle of creation and destruction dictated by time and previously unseen by any but the Conqueror himself. A cycle that could finally explain the enigma that is Kang. And a cycle that begins and ends with an old and broken Kang sending his younger self down a dark path… Check out all 12 covers now before the release on August 18th!

Review: Heroes Reborn #7

Heroes Reborn #7

Heroes Reborn has been an interesting event. It’s one that has shown its potential. But, that potential has never really been reached. The narrative has taken on a different delivery with a series of one-shots and a main series that’s been split. Half of the main event comic has focused on the members of the Squadron Supreme while the second half has dipped its toes into the bigger story of a world changed. This “final” issue continues that pattern. Heroes Reborn #7 has the Squadron Supreme attempting to figure out who the Avengers are while the second gives a better idea as to who is behind everything.

Delivering an event in a style that’s almost like an anthology is absolutely something different and new. But, it also has felt like not enough. Writer Jason Aaron has juggled his two tasks and done with what he could. The comic has had to build this world with a rich past and current present while also addressing the mystery before us. The mystery aspect has felt like it’s gotten shortchanged as the series has done its best “What if Marvel did DC?”. That riff on DC has been interesting and entertaining with numerous winks and nods. But, there’s something that doesn’t completely click about it all. It’s not really DC as more Earth-3 DC as the Squadron Supreme builds up a pile of bodies and we learn more of their thirst for war and destruction.

With the main event, you’d think this issue would wrap things up. Nope, it’s extended even further with the upcoming Heroes Return. That makes this seven-issue series feel even shorter in its goals. It’s the opening chapter in what will likely be dragged out further than it needs to. The issue for Heroes Reborn interestingly doesn’t seem to be the content or concept but its execution and packaging.

The art by Aaron Kuder and Ed McGuinness is solid. The comic looks great as each brings their styles to the issue. It looks great and that’s not a problem at all. Mark Morales ads his inks to McGuinness’ pencils with Dean White and Matthew Wilson handling color with Cory Petit on lettering. Everyone looks fantastic, the locations are interesting and the moments between characters flows nicely. The issue never pops though. There’s moments that should have been memorable but it never hits the reader. It could be due to the shortened storytelling pages but the imagery never stands out as epic and memorable.

Heroes Reborn #7 like the issue before both works and doesn’t. There’s some great ideas and concepts but it never quite clicks and flows. Everything feels too short and like it’s missing that moment that really hits you. The fact that it ends as just one chapter doesn’t help matters. This is another Marvel event that doesn’t hit the mark.

Story: Jason Aaron Art: Aaron Kuder, Ed McGuinness
Ink: Mark Morales Color: Dean White, Matthew Wilson Letterer: Cory Petit
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Preview: American Ronin TP

American Ronin TP

(W) Peter Milligan (A/CA) Aco
In Shops: Mar 17, 2021
SRP: $9.99

War is over, democracy an illusion, real power now lies not with nation-states but huge corporations engaged in a silent war for global domination. Their number one weapon: highly-skilled, technologically-enhanced operatives trained since childhood to pledge their allegiance to the corporate flag. But what happens when one such operative breaks free of his mental chains and decides to bring the whole system down? Can one “Ronin” make a difference?

American Ronin TP

Review: The One You Feed #1

The One You Feed #1

With the world of digital comics expanding, it opens up greater opportunities to drop comics without a lead-up and as a surprise. That happened with The One You Feed #1, the latest comic to debut through the digital comic platform Panel Syndicate.

Set in our modern world a phenomenon has begun. As the sun goes down and moon rises individuals turn into monsters. It doesn’t happen to all and seems to happen at random. Those monsters do what monsters do and destroy and kill. That has led the survivors of the world to band together to build a walled city fueled by an artificial sun where it’s never dark. Over 350 years in the future the city, Helios, is on the verge of a new leader, a young prince named Apollo. He’ll have to travel beyond the walls, survive, and return to take the thrown.

Writer Donny Cates knocks it out of the park with this debut that creates a future fantasy world. The first chapter focuses on the set up of what’s to come teasing out that what we’re told is lies and to expect an unexpected adventure. Cates has a mission with this debut chapter and that’s to shape a world and story. The world presented is an interesting one and its taken in an unexpected direction. We’ve seen numerous “cities built to protect against the monsters” story but this blends in the classic “quest” direction. It’s also clear where the story goes isn’t what’s presented. There’s likely more about the monsters and the quest. That’s the story Cates is focused on.

There’s also something nice and different with Cates’ take. The focus on a more fantasy world makes the debut stand out. The series could easily stick to its future tech setting but a city ruled by a King and a Prince who must complete a quest has a throwback and classic quality about it. The One You Feed #1 takes a familiar story and places it in a different and unexpected setting.

The art by Dylan Burnett is fantastic. Along with color by Dean White and lettering by John J. Hill the series has a nice blend of its various aspects. The monsters are numerous and varied. The technology progression tells a story by itself. And, when we get to the end point of time that begins our story the design too tells us what we need to know. While Cates dialogue walks us through Apollo’s perspective, the art team delivers what we need to know as far as what has happened over the years as well. The art fills in the details that Apollo’s words do not.

The One You Feed #1 is an absolute get. The unexpected release of it adds to the fun of it all but the quality is the real draw. This is a future fantasy story that has a lot of intrigue going for it and teases that it’ll take us in unexpected directions. The fact it’s pay-what-you-want is a bonus (and you should pay for it). Panel Syndicate is a publishing platform who is synonymous with quality and this is another feather in its cap.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Dylan Burnett
Color: Dean White Letterer/Design: John J. Hill
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: Panel Syndicate

Donny Cates and Dylan Burnett’s The One You Feed Debuts on Panel Syndicate

Panel Syndicate has a surprise debut on this new comic book day with The One You Feed from writer Donny Cates, artist Dylan Burnett, colorist Dean White, and letterer/designer John H. Hill.

The One You Feed is a fantasy terror tale perfectly timed for Halloween.

One day, long ago, and for no reason whatsoever..the moon rose in the night sky, and every human being on the planet began to violently change into the demons that live inside of their souls. Some of these monsters were good. Most…were not. Now, after hundreds of years of these nightly horrors, a young prince, armed only with a mysterious sword named Attum, must journey into the night to face the monsters under the stars, and meet the wolf that lives in his own heart…

Panel Syndicate is a digital comics platform that allows you to pay whatever price you want! You can get the comic right now.

Review: American Carnage #6

AMERICAN CARNAGE #6

Omar Epps is one of those actors, whose sheer magnetism makes for must-watch television. Everything he usually is in is well written and typically showcases his characters in a strong light. The first I remembered seeing him was in the 90s classic, Juice. It starred a burgeoning actor/rapper, named Tupac Shakur and Epps played the protagonist in that film.

Epps would go on to star in many other features. He’d occasionally work in television, as his run on House, was as long as the main star. One of my favorite movies, by him, was the severely underrated In Too Deep. He played an undercover cop, whose work would blur the lines of reality, leading him on an unexpected path. In the brilliantly crafted American Carnage #6, Wright is also ensnared in this criminal enterprise, and the only way he can destroy it is from within.

We open up on Morgan, espousing his philosophy to Richard, trying t show why he thinks how he does and why his organization is the future of America. We also find Richard trying to stave off any rumblings of a civil war, by carefully making those who are disgruntled, know their place. Richard eventually comes to the realization that he must cross a line that pushes the legality of the case. By the issue‘s end, Richard finally tells Jennifer, the truth, a decision that may lead to deadly consequences.

Overall, American Carnage #6 is an exceptional issue, which adds a layer of danger for our protagonist. The story by Bryan Edward Hill is brilliant. The art by the creative team is amazing. Altogether, a story that is too close to our reality, which is why this a must-read.

Story: Bryan Edward Hill Art: Leandro Fernandez, Dean White, and Ben Oliver
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle

Review: American Carnage #4

AMERICAN CARNAGE #4

Edward Norton is one of those actors whose presence on onscreen is understated but resonant. The way he underplays most of his characters makes viewing them a pleasure as he understands the story is what makes the story. Most people don’t know that he co-wrote Frida, the movie about much-heralded and immortal Frida Kahlo. One of my favorite movies by him is Rounders, a movie where he showed his vulnerability.

Where I actually found about him was in American History X. It showed how a reformed Nazi had to reckon with his past. Though the movie had some tough scenes to watch, it showed the power of redemption. In the brilliantly crafted American Carnage #4, Wright finally infiltrates the organization which is much like in American History X, leading to some uncomfortable truths.

We open up on Jennifer Morgan talking to the police, as the detective assigned to the case, trying to assess if this was racially motivated and why. We eventually find out that Wynn might have dissension in the ranks, as what happened to Jennifer, maybe some type of message. Richard eventually reaches out to Sheila, who implores him to agitate the situation By the issue‘s end, someone guns down Richard, as what comes next is only that more complicated

Overall, a grand issue, American Carnage #4 changes the definition of “pulse-pounding”. The story by Bryan Edward Hill is outstanding. The art by the creative team is astonishing. Altogether, a story that may mean the end for one character.

Story: Bryan Edward Hill Art: Leandro Fernandez, Dean White, and Ben Oliver
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle

Review: American Carnage #3

AMERICAN CARNAGE #3

There is that point in most procedural stories, where there is the line of no return. In the show The Shield, it was an often slippery slope for Vic Mackey and his crew. They not only chased after real criminals but they partook in criminal activities. This led to some close calls and the eventual arrest of this group. It showed that when one does not have remorse they have never really understood morality in the first place.

In the very first episode, they got rid of the very character who could have exposed them. This is where they solidified themselves as something quite different than anything else on the television landscape. It is was that line that Vic Mackey never had a problem crossing that most of us would not. In the brilliantly crafted American Carnage #3, Wright is on the crux of that point of no return.

We open on Wright right as the gang was about to kill a random black Man they found on the street, which due to unforeseen events, becomes messy, leading Wright to kill the man to deescalate the situation. We also find out in a flashback, that Wright during psych evaluation, was questioned about his racial identity and  how we would use it as motivation during this particular assignment. Before he could get his bearings, a masked man shows up to take an uncompromising picture of Richard, which can blow his cover and something the Neo Nazi group may be using as leverage. By Issue‘s end, someone looks to kill Morgan’s daughter, making the whole case even more bizarre.

Overall, American Carnage #3 is a great issue that delivers the story its twist. The issue by Bryan Edward Hill is excellent. The art by the creative team is stunning. Altogether, a story that up the stakes for its protagonist.

Story: Bryan Edward Hill Art: Leandro Fernandez, Dean White, and Ben Oliver
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy


Purchase: comiXology – Amazon – Kindle

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