Tag Archives: dave sharpe

Review: Dark Ark: Arc One

We know the story of Noah but did you know there was another boat commanded by a sorcerer named Shrae? He too had a mission and animals… well, more monsters.

Dark Ark: Arc One collects issues #1-15.

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Juan Doe
Letterer: Ryane Hill, Dave Sharpe

Get your copy in comic shops now in bookstores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle
comiXology

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Knights Temporal

Auguste de Riviere is a knight during the Crusades who ventures into a dark forest and emerges into the modern world.

Knights Temporal collects issues #1-5.

Story: Cullen Bunn
Art: Frank Galán
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy in comic shops now in bookstores now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW
Zeus Comics

AfterShock provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Bloodshot: Definitive Edition

Want to know what inspired the Bloodshot film starring Vin Diesel? Bloodshot: Definitive Edition has you covered collecting issues #0-13!

Story: Duane Swierczynski, Matt Kindt
Art: Manuel Garcia, Arturo Lozzi, Barry Kitson, Matthew Clark, Matt Ryan, Stefano Gaudiano, Mark Pennington, Clayton Crain, ChrisCross
Color: Ian Hannin, Moose Baumann, Brian Reber, Chris Sotomayor
Letterer: Rob Steen, Dave Sharpe

Get your copy in comic shops and bookstores! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Bloodshot #7

Bloodshot #7

Before you see Vin Diesel’s Bloodshot on the big screen… leap into the thrilling comics with “Burned” Part One, kicking off in Bloodshot #7!

What better way to release a comic featuring the first character to appear on the big screen than by having it start with a new jumping on point? A first issue, you could say, and you wouldn’t be wrong – but with the comic already having had seven issues released (including Bloodshot #0) it would have been a touch disingenuous to renumber the series with the story still ongoing. Nobody would ever do that. Certainly not.

If you are looking to check the character out ahead of the movie, or you’re reading this after having seen the Sony Pictures Bloodshot movie starring Vin Diesal, then you’ll be happy to know that Bloodshot #7 is fairly new reader friendly. Cleverly paced dialogue that flows without feeling like forced exposition tells you everything you need to know.

Bloodshot has been one fast-paced and frenetic issue after another. It has been a great ride for the last seven issues. I’ve certainly enjoyed the series for what it is; a popcorn comic that has a depth to it that’s revealed further with each issue. Tim Seeley gives you a little more of his plan with each release. There are moments in this issue that change or enhance your idea of the characterizations of some characters inbetween the action. It’s this balance that allows you to fly through the book while still feeling like you’ve read more than the twenty-odd pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph feels familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing when my feelings on the visuals haven’t changed. Personally, I love how this book looks. The lines are clean and it’s very easy to discern what’s happening on every page.

Bloodshot #7 isn’t the most original story. It won’t shake you to your core or have you asking yourself deeply introspective questions. But not every comic needs to do that. What Bloodshot does, it does very well. Seeley, Booth, and co have been remarkably consistent issue to issue, and I can’t really find any fault in an issue that does exactly what it says on the tin (that may be an obscure reference for you – it’s from a UK add originating in the late 90’s from a company called Ronseal).

Bloodshot remains one of the series I look forward to reading each month. This wasn’t the best comic I’ve read this week, but it still comes with a big fat stamp of approval from me.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Rai #5

RAI #5

Rai and the Eternal Warrior fight in a bloody war against Bloodfather’s forces in the battle for Hope Springs in Rai #5.

I absolutely loved the first issue of the current volume of Rai. I was quite taken with the second issue, as well as the third and fourth. After how much I loved Fallen World, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy Rai as much as I have. Every issue has been near perfection. The theme of the series is the inclusion of technology in our lives and the potential future we face.

One could argue I’m reading too much into the comics, but I’d like to counter that. After all, what a reader takes from a book can be different depending on their perspectives.

The core concept of the series is that Rai and his younger brother figure who is also an older model android, Raijin, are searching for Offspirng. Not the band, but rather pieces of artificially intelligent code that when returned to Bloodfather will make him nigh unstoppable. Each issue centers around Rai and Raijin and their search for more Offspring. With that search, Dan Abnett is able to expand upon the world of 4002 A.D..

Rai #5 deals with the brutality of Bloodfather’s attack on Hope Springs. It’s a confrontation that’s designed to show how effective Juan Jose Ryp is in depicting a bloody fight. The artist is fantastic here as he captures the rage and desperation on the faces of the defenders. Andrew Dalhouse gives vibrancy to Ryp’s detailed artwork. His brighter colors are often at odds with the violence on the page in a glorious dichotomy. Severed limbs have never quite looked so pretty.

There’s more to this book than abject violence, though. Abnett waits for the majority of the fighting to be done to hit you with an unexpected combination of reveals that will leave you thinking about the book for hours. I’m not going to say anything more about that here, but rest assured the creative team have delivered another seminal comic book about a half android samurai.

Like last issue, there were a couple of minor blips for me this issue, primarily around the Eternal Warrior’s beard, but again they’re so inconsequential in the long run that I’m not factoring them in with the overall visual experience. What bothers me may not even register for you, and ultimately it doesn’t impact the quality of the comic.

I said about Rai #5 that “at this point, if I could only read one comic a month, then it would be Rai.” The same is every bit as true with this issue. Rai is easily the book I look forward to most each month.

Writer: Dan Abnett Artist: Juan Jose Ryp
Colorist: Andrew Dalhouse Letter: Dave Sharpe

Story: 9.8 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Bloodshot #7 Gets a Fully Loaded Edition Featuring Vin Diesel

Before Bloodshot #7 hits shelves on March 11th, Valiant has revealed the explosive issue will also receive a special “Fully Loaded” Edition on April 8th!

Featuring Vin Diesel’s Bloodshot on the cover, the Bloodshot #7 “Fully Loaded” Edition is packed with eight epic pages of bonus content that includes new artwork, classified information, and commentary from Bloodshot’s co-creator Kevin Vanhook

Bloodshot #7 kicks off part 1 of the new story arc “Burned,” an action-packed three-issue story that unleashes hell on Earth! Valiant’s supersoldier must hunt down monsters, aliens, living weapons, and other terrifying threats after they’re set loose from a top-secret facility. It’s the perfect jumping-on spot while also continuing the fast-paced and thrilling storyline that Bloodshot writer Tim Seeley has been crafting since the debut issue.

The “Fully Loaded” edition of Bloodshot #7 will release on the same day as Bloodshot #8 (April 8th), allowing fans to jump right into the first two chapters of “Burned!”

Bloodshot #7 “Fully Loaded” will be available in comic shops and wherever comics are sold on April 8th. The issue is written by Tim Seeley, features art by Marc Laming and Jason Masters, colors by Andrew Dalhouse, and letters by Dave Sharpe.

Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition

Preview: RAI #5

RAI #5

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by JUAN JOSÉ RYP
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by RAMÓN F. BACHS
Cover B by MIGUEL SEPULVEDA
Cover C by ADAM POLLINA
Preorder Cover by JASON METCALF
On sale MARCH 11 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Rai and the Eternal Warrior fight in a bloody war against Bloodfather’s forces in the battle for Hope Springs.

RAI #5

Preview: Bloodshot #7

BLOODSHOT #7

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by MARC LAMING, JASON MASTERS
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by TYLER KIRKHAM
Cover B by KAEL NGU
Cover C by NIK VIRELLA
Preorder Cover by JUAN DOE
On sale MARCH 11 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Before you see Vin Diesel’s Bloodshot on the big screen… leap into the thrilling comics with “BURNED” PART ONE!

BLOODSHOT #7

Review: Bloodshot #0

Bloodshot #0

Artist Mac Laming unleashes eye-popping artwork as the truth behind Bloodshot’s mission is revealed in Bloodshot #0!

After reading Bloodshot #0 part of me wondered why the comic hadn’t been released in sequence. This comic bridges the gap between the end of Harbinger Wars II and the beginning of the current Bloodshot series. It addresses how the events of Harbinger II and how he dealt with what he was forced to do.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the answer is not well.

The comic opens with Bloodshot in hiding. He’s trying to disappear and avoid the killing machine he once was, working on a pipeline in northwestern Siberia. Writer Tim Seeley takes a step back from the frenetic pace he’s been using in the six issues so far. He really delves into the psyche of a man who has been used and abused by friends and enemies alike.

Not only does Seeley explore Bloodshot’s broken soul, but he also shows us how he ends up doing what he’s doing at the beginning of Bloodshot #1. There’s a lot of story in this issue. It still doesn’t feel like you’re trying to fit seventeen eggs into a twelve pack.

Under Tim Seeley’s pen, Bloodshot has been one of the more consistent series that Valiant is currently publishing. It’s often a fast-paced action comic with enough hidden depths in each issue to stop it from being overly shallow. With the zero issue, Seeley has shown what he can do with the character when he slows the pace down. And it makes me hopeful that we’ll get more moments like this in the future.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming who handles the art for the first time this series, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. Laming’s style acts as a visual bridge between Doug Braithwaite’s art at the end of Bloodshot Salvation and Brett Booth’s take on the character in the latest volume. The cold desolation of the comic’s setting is evident in the shades of blue and grey used when the scenes take place outside.

There’s a great full-page around the middle of the comic that emphasizes Bloodshot’s view of himself; a weapon to be used.

But who gets to use the weapon?

The comic does a great job of asking the question and offering an answer that we’ve been reading for the past six issues.

Bloodshot #0 is probably the best comic in the series so far. It is successful as a bridge between stories, as a single issue standalone story and as an introduction to Bloodshot #1 and the character as well. All in all, that’s a home run for the zero issue, which is far more than I expected from an issue which has often been little more than a stop-gap between the numbered issues.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Andrew Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Preview: Bloodshot #0

BLOODSHOT #0

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by MARC LAMING
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by ROBERTO DE LA TORRE
Cover B by RAMÓN F. BACHS
Cover C by FRANCIS PORTELA
On sale FEBRUARY 19 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Artist Mac Laming unleashes eye-popping artwork as the truth behind Bloodshot’s mission is revealed!

BLOODSHOT #0
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