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Review: Miskatonic: Even Death May Die

Miskatonic: Even Death May Die picks up right after the first volume delivering a bit more of an ending as a threat lingers underneath the ocean.

Story: Mark Sable
Art: Giorgio Pontrelli
Color: Pippa Bowland
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 Gets a Second Printing

Following the news that the first four issues of Superman: Son of Kal-El are being reprinted, the fan excitement for the series continues to grow as DC will also be reprinting the milestone fifth issue of the series. If you missed out on ordering the first time, fans can now order a copy of Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 at their local comic book shops by Sunday, November 28 and it will be available on the same day as Superman: Son of Kal-El #6, Tuesday, December 28.

From writer Tom Taylor, artist John Timms, colorist HI-FI and letterer Dave Sharpe, issue #5 of Superman: Son of Kal-El is now available in comic book shops and digital retailers. After initially striking up a friendship with reporter Jay Nakamura, he and Jon become romantically involved in the pages of Superman: Son of Kal-El #5. Following a scene where Superman mentally and physically burns out from trying to save everyone that he can, Jay is there to care for the Man of Steel.

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 second printing features a special version of the variant cover originally created by Travis Moore and Tamra Bonvillain for the fifth issue.

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 2nd printing

Review: Superman, Son of Kal-El #5

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 shows just how stressful being Superman is (Especially when Bendix hits you with some solar energy.) in a focused story from Tom Taylor, John Timms, and Hi-Fi. Jon Kent think he can save everyone thanks to his little power boost that enhances his strength and speed, but it also increases his stress levels and leads to a kind of superpowered burnout. This is a comic for anyone who has taken on way too much at work or school and just can’t handle it any more as Taylor and Timms zeroes on Jon’s emotions and also set up a little romance with Jay, a journalist and metahuman.

John Timms and Hi-Fi’s visuals drive home how overworked Jon is while Tom Taylor’s plot has Jon Kent flying all over the world and only delegating a single task to a fellow superhero, The Flash, who definitely knows what he’s going through. Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 features several single and double page spreads with darting figures everywhere. There’s one page in particular where Timms and Hi-Fi depict Jon as just a red blur grabbing every citizen of a town in Luxembourg that has been overwhelmed by a flood. However, when Jon is portrayed in close-up, John Timms draws him with dark circle and beads of sweat coming down his face showing that he’s ill, and although he’s bulletproof, he still gets tired. A concept that comes into play throughout the comic is control with Jay and The Aerie finally telling Jon to take a break because people around the world are filming and saying that he can’t control himself.

These reality checks combined with Taylor’s narration for Jon shows how much self-control it takes to be Superman. You can’t just fly around willy-nilly: that shit is for Miracleman or Homelander. He and John Timms are digging into a vein of Superman story that can be great (The ending Superman vs. Darkseid battle in Justice League Unlimited) or not so great (Superman Returns video game). They create tension through Jon having to maintain control of his enhanced abilities and avoiding collateral damage that would directly contradict his mission to save everyone. However, the events of Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 are a wake up call for his youthful idealism and stress the importance of self-care and not filling one’s plate too much. But because Jon Kent’s job involves the difference between life or death, this sometimes gets lost in the shuffle, and the issue wraps up with him again going into action.

The cover of Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 isn’t misleading as Tom Taylor and Timms continue to flesh out the relationship between Jon and Jay. In-story, a big deal isn’t made about Jon’s sexuality: he and Jay have chemistry and an emotional bond so they smooch. It’s refreshing and reads like your standard superhero romantic subplot instead of some kind of Glee-esque very special issue although that’s the kind of media coverage this comic has been getting. (Just saying, Superman being bi would have been a huge deal for me as a queer kid so I’m 100% okay with all the hype and have enjoyed laughing at the ignorant cretins on Fox News and right wing Twitter.) I enjoy the back and forth that Taylor writes for Jon and Jay, and how sensitive Jay is to Jon’s needs giving him noise-canceling headphones so he can take a break from saving the day. Previous comics have laid the ground for their activism-driven approach to superheroics so Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 is really the culmination of everything as they’re ready to fight Bendix in upcoming issues. Also, Hi-Fi’s colors play an underrated part in showing Jon and Jay’s feelings for each other as the studio uses softer lighting compared to Jon’s frenetic flying and superheroing. The vibe for their first kiss is more like a Carly Rae Jepsen live show than a cape book.

Superman: Son of Kal-El #5 is character, not plot-driven as Tom Taylor, John Timms, and Hi-Fi dig into Jon Kent’s emotions at both work and play. He has great power, but he also has limitations. However, smooching a cute boy and taking some time for self-care will help with that so that Jon is back in action and using his powers in a social justice-tinged way.

Story: Tom Taylor Art: John Timms
Colors: Hi-Fi Letters: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art:8.5 Overall: 8.7 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Exclusive Preview: AfterShock Triple Play #1

AFTERSHOCK TRIPLE PLAY #1

Writers: Marguerite Bennett, Cullen Bunn, Roy Miranda, Inaki Miranda 
Artists: Elton Thomasi, Antonio Fuso, Inaki Miranda
Colorists: Marco Lesko, Stefano Simeone, Eva De La Cruz
Letterers: Marshall Dillon & Dave Sharpe 
Gatefold Wraparound Cover: Andrei Bressan w/ Adriano Lucas
$4.99 / 64 pages / Color / On Sale 12/08/2021

Three classic AfterShock stories offered together for the first time!
Another story of The Wake, with a fish rescue mission; a monstrous tale from the Dark Ark; and a journey into the Wastelands as humanity’s time ticks down — the AfterShock Triple Play combines three must-read free comic book day issues featuring characters from WE LIVE, ANIMOSITY and DARK ARK into one highly collectible volume!
Featuring the talents of Marguerite Bennett, Elton Thomasi, Cullen Bunn, Antonio Fuso and The Miranda Brothers!

AFTERSHOCK TRIPLE PLAY #1

Isaac Mogajane, Santtos, and Dave Sharpe take you to the Land of the Living Gods in February 2022

LAND OF THE LIVING GODS #1

Writer: Isaac Mogajane 
Artist and Colorist: Santtos 
Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Cover: Santtos 
Incentive Cover: Andy Clarke w/ Jose Villarrubia
$4.99 / 32 pages / Color / On Sale 02.02.22

It is said that when the world dies, the spirits of the first people will return to witness the last days of humanity. Well, the spirits have arrived, and the end is here. But not everyone has given up hope.  

Naledi, a teenage girl living in the deserted city once called Johannesburg, has always believed that there is a land, hidden away in time, where the gods still live. And where there are gods, there are miracles. Perhaps even miracles that are big enough to save our dying planet. And so, after a lifetime of isolation, Naledi will head out into the unknown with little to hold onto but her faith – and her magical pet plant, Buyo.
 

A fairy tale for the times in which we find ourselves, brought to life by South African writer and producer Isaac Mogajane (Matwetwe, Catching Feelings) and Brazilian artist Santtos (Night Shift), LAND OF THE LIVING GODS will introduce you to a world of wonder and cruelty, beauty and perseverance – and will leave you profoundly changed.

Exclusive Preview: Miskatonic: Even Death May Die

MISKATONIC: EVEN DEATH MAY DIE

Writer: Mark Sable 
Artist: Giorgio Pontrelli 
Colorist: Pippa Bowland  
Letterer: Dave Sharpe 
Cover: Jeremy Haun 
Incentive Cover: Cliff Richards
$6.99 / 48 pages / Color / 11.24.21

The hit series returns!

The horrifying events in the Miskatonic Valley have torn apart retired detective Tom Malone and ex-FBI agent Miranda Keller. Miranda tries to escape a Deep One concentration camp and a traumatized Tom is obsessed with finding and freeing her. But soon they both start sharing dreams of Cthulhu, a monstrous entity in the South Pacific who will soon awaken and bring about the end of the world as we know it.   

From the returning team of Mark Sable (Graveyard of Empires, WAR ON TERROR: GODKILLERS) and Giorgio Pontrelli (Dylan Dog).

MISKATONIC: EVEN DEATH MAY DIE

Review: After Dark

Four tales of terror in this anthology. As with all anthologies, it’s a bit mixed as quality but find out what we thought!

Story: Cullen Bunn, Joe Pruett, Jim Starlin, Frank Tieri
Art: Cliff Richards, Szymon Kudranski, Nikkol Jelenic, Joe Eisma
Color: DC Alonso, Matt Herms
Letterer: Dave Sharpe, Carlos M. Mangual

Get your copy in comic shops! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Kindle
comiXology
Zeus Comics
TFAW


AfterShock Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Monster Kill Squad #2

Monsters are real. This is the team tasked with taking them out. Welcome to the Monster Kill Squad.

Story: Christos Gage, Matt Kindt
Art: Tomas Giorello, Juan José Ryp
Color: Diego Rodriguez, Andrew Dalhouse
Letterer: Dave Sharpe

Find a comic shop to get your copy

Or, buy your copy at the link below:

Zeus Comics


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Ninjak #4

ninjak #4

The first four issues of Jeff Parker and Javier Pulido Ninjak are here, and the long and the short of this review is that Ninjak #4 is really enjoyable, but there is a rather large asterisk added to that sentence that I’ll come back to in a moment because it does verge into spoiler territory – if you want to avoid that, then just know that the book is still worth picking up if you’ve enjoyed the other three issues.

At this point if you’ve been following the chatter about this series then you’ll know that not all of it has been positive when it comes to the art. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, but I’m genuinely enjoying Javier Pulido’s work; he brings a fresh look to Valiant’s comics, and I’ve since sought out other comics Pulido has contributed to, such as Matt Fraction’s Hawkeye run. One of the strengths of Pulido’s artwork is in how he uses the panel layouts to add to the motion of the story in ways that are both overt and subtle; Pulido’s style allows you to flow across the page much like a skate over ice, which is a poor metaphor to say that it’s a smooth read.

The story of Ninjak #4 focuses on Ninjak looking to assassinate Kingmaker and Syphon, which is a fairly straight forward conclusion to the arc thus far. We’ve seen Ninjak use firearms more in Jeff Parker’s run with the character we typically have before, which makes a lot of sense given his lack of high tech equipment after the destruction of his home and separation from MI6 (in Matt Kindt’s Ninjak and Christos Gage’s Ninja-K, respectively). It’s a facet to the character that I enjoy, though admittedly it may not be everyone’s cup of tea. The issue’s pacing is a touch slower than Ninjak #3, as Parker spends time revealing what he’s been hinting at when it comes to how Kingmaker and Syphon have been operating.

The asterisk I had mentioned earlier in the review, however, is that the story doesn’t really come to any kind of satisfying conclusion. If there was another issue coming in November or December, then the ending of the book would make total sense; as it is, the story feels a little too unfinished for an extended break. This may just be me wishing that Valiant were publishing more than two or three books a month, but when it comes to Ninjak the break has a very real chance of slowing any momentum the comic was gaining. The break seems a little too abrupt given the place the story is in.

That said, at the end of the day, I thoroughly enjoyed the book as it is, and ultimately that’s what is important when it comes to reading comics.

Story and Art: Jeff Parker and Javier Pulido
Letters: Dave Sharpe and Javier Pulido
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.6 Overall: 8.25 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Preview: Ninjak #4

NINJAK #4

Written by JEFF PARKER
Art by BENI LOBEL & JAVIER PULIDO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by FERNANDO DAGNINO
Cover B by ROBBI RODRIGUEZ
Pre-order Cover by PEDRO ANDREO
On sale OCTBER 13th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Part 4 of “Daylight!”

The truth revealed. Nowhere left to run. A formidable foe strikes first.

The stunning final chapter of Jeff Parker and Javier Pulido’s explosive first story arc.

NINJAK #4
Almost American
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