Tag Archives: dave lanphear

Search for Hu banner ad

NYCC 2021: Andy Serkis’ Eternus Comes to Scout Comics

Scout Comics and Thunder Comics have announced the new comic series Eternus by actor/director/producer Andy Serkis.

The seven-issue Eternus, co-created with director Andrew Levitas, is inspired by myth and takes place in 360 AD, 30 years after the murder of Zeus in his own temples. Zeus’ son, Heracles, is now a depressed drunk, while the old gods struggle to stay alive after decades of Christian disruption. When Athena’s Temple is sacked by a mysterious Centurion in search of a relic once belonging to Zeus, the old gods are convinced this is Zeus’ killer. Now Heracles must sober up and protect the only witness to identify the killer.

The Source/Unikorn scribe Don Handfield is writing with Anastajza K Davis. Art hails from penciler Karl Moline, inker Andy Owens and letter Dave Lanphear. Rob Prior will paint the main covers.

A limited-edition ashcan NOW AVAILABLE for pre-order on Scout’s website and at New York Comic Con starting this Thursday, where cover artist Rob Prior will be doing a signing. There’s two versions, a regular edition and a limited edition METAL cover edition.

Eternus

Head Back to the 80s with Download, a Love Letter to 80s Sci-fi and Action Movies with Kids

For fans of The Goonies, Gremlins, and classic Amblin style films what’s old is new again Red 5 Comics’ paean to classic 80s sci-fi adventure Download, in stores this December. Creator and writer Scott Chitwood re-teams with artist Danny Luckert for the series. Colors are by PH Gomes with lettering by Troy Peteri and Dave Lanphear.

A bolt of light from the sky strikes young Eric one evening and life will never be the same for him or his friends. When Eric comes to his mind is filled with plans and schematics for strange devices. Devices for which he has no idea what they do or how they work, only that he is compelled to build them and turn them on…

Channeling that love and nostalgia for classic 80s films, Download will re-visit and re-invent classic sci-fi adventure this Christmas as a four issue monthly series beginning December 2021.

Download #1

Review: I Am Batman #0

John Ridley delivers the start of Jace Fox’s next chapter and steps to becoming Batman.

Story: John Ridley
Art: Travel Foreman
Ink: Norm Rapmund
Color: Rex Lokus
Letterer: Dave Lanphear

Get your copy now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

comiXology
Kindle
Zeus Comics
TFAW


This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: I Am Batman #0

I Am Batman #0

In DC’s Future State, we met a new Batman, Jace Fox. The future Gotham has turned into a neon fascist nightmare where masks are outlawed and the Gotham PD are overshadowed by a private military police force called the Magistrate. The result created a nightmare future where Batman was the enemy and freedom as an illusion. When DC launched its current line and focus, the Batman comics started to lay the ground for that nightmare future. One of those series was The Next Batman: Second Son which laid the groundwork for Jace’s new role. I Am Batman is the next chapter in Jace’s evolution as he takes his first steps in the Batman persona.

Writer John Ridley returns to tell Jace’s story and continues to explore how his family dynamic and past mistakes drive his focus. Ridley’s storytelling has a brilliance about it. He does an amazing job of balancing outright telling the reader what they need to know and seeding enough hints and details for them to put things together themselves.

What Ridley also gives us is a flawed hero. Jace messes up, a lot. He doesn’t know everything he’s doing and we’re really getting an “origin’ story with some pretty hard lessons for the hero to learn. And that extends beyond just the physical part. Jace has to deal with public relations and perception as well and due to the past Ridley has driven home, we understand why.

But, Ridley also delivers a story that has relevance. The issue’s tension, at multiple times, is about the clashes between the Gotham PD and protestors. It’s hard not to think about Black Lives Matter and the real life protests that regularly occurred over the past year. Ridley is a master of mixing entertainment and social relevance.

Travel Foreman‘s art is good though never quite excites. With ink by Norm Rapmund, color by Rex Lokus, and lettering by Dave Lanphear, the art does its job of conveying the tension, emotion, and action. But, it misses the mark for those iconic moments. The comic’s art works best during the quieter moments like when Jace has trouble talking to a potential romantic interest. The protests, and Batman’s moments, never quite deliver the punch needed. It does well but not great.

I Am Batman #0 is a nice bridge from the previous series and this one. We get to see Jace’s initial steps as Batman after his discovery in the previous series. We get more of his thoughts, motivation, and his view as to what he needs to do next to succeed. It gives us a flawed individual who we can see grow and while we might not always agree with what he does, we can understand his viewpoint. It gives us a well-rounded character that could very well be the future of the DC Universe.

Story: John Ridley Art: Travel Foreman
Ink: Norm Rapmund Color: Rex Lokus Letterer: Dave Lanphear
Story: 9.0 Art: 7.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus ComicsTFAW

Superman ’78 Takes Off in August and You Can Get a New Look!

Beginning this fall, decades after Richard Donner and Christopher Reeve’s Superman: The Movie introduced generations of fans to a silver screen version of DC’s Man of Steel, DC returns to this beloved property to tell new stories set within this world with the publication of Superman ’78 by writer Rob Venditti and artist Wilfredo Torres!

In this first look preview, Superman ‘78 #1 begins with all the classic elements of Superman: The Movie on full display. Check it out, and then scroll through for more information about this new comic book series launching in print and digitally on August 24!

In Superman ’78, bystanders are surprised and delighted by Superman’s abilities, and Lois Lane doesn’t (yet!) know that Clark Kent is secretly Superman. The sheer thrill of seeing a man fly, leap, or stop a bullet will be reflected in this environment where Superman has just been introduced! Inspired by Donner’s classic, timeless style of superhero storytelling, in Superman ’78 Venditti and Torres will remind fans that a man can truly fly.

Superman ‘78 #1 by Rob Venditti, Wilfredo Torres, Jordie Bellaire, and Dave Lanphear arrives on August 24 with a cover by Torres, plus variant covers by Evan “Doc” Shaner (open to order) and Torres (1:25).

Coming up in the Superman ’78 run:

After a battle with a rampaging robot, Superman enlists an unlikely ally to crack the code behind who sent it. He needs an intelligent technological genius, and that can only mean one person: Lex Luthor!

In order to save Metropolis, Superman must surrender to Brainiac or watch his city burn to the ground! After being taken aboard Brainiac’s ship, Superman finds a shocking piece of his past that changes his entire future! Meanwhile, Lois Lane gets a cryptic message from a mysterious source claiming to have a  way to save the Man of Steel!

No Ghosts in Hiroshima is Out this June from Scout Comics

Hell doesn’t always come in a hand basket; sometimes it comes in a briefcase. Guilt is the greatest ghost of them all. For James Henricherson, the guilt of a mistake made many years ago continues to haunt him. It dogs his every move. It keeps him from sleeping. He believes he has condemned an innocent soul to eternal suffering and pain. And he has worked for years to invent a way to free this soul from Hell itself. But Henricherson’s attempts and his theoretical success has stirred the condemned souls of Hell, who see this as a way to get power in Hell.

Gabriel’s quest to fulfill his mentor’s last request takes him and his girlfriend onto the California Highway (Route 666), where they find that they are being followed and threatened by demons who make ‘Road Rage’ seem like a walk in the park. While on the run, they discover that they may hold the key to escaping Hell itself.

Gabriel is convinced that the men searching for the secrets of his former mentor’s experiments are no men at all. They are demons hellbent on getting their hands on what they believe could indeed be an escape from Hell. And while his quest takes him from the city of Los Angeles to the forests of San Francisco, there is no escape from the shadow of the damned that reaches out for him. And all those who try to help him!

No Ghosts in Hiroshima is from writers Jim Krueger and J. Luigi Borrillo featuring art by Alberto Rios, lettering by Dave Lanphear, and colorist Zach Brunner. It’s edited by Andrea Lorenzo Molinari, featuring a cover by Brunner, and being published by Scout Comics.

No Ghosts in Hiroshima #1

Underrated: Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado (Redux)

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado


bs colorado.jpg

I wanted to revisit this book, because I’ve recently reread and still don’t think it gets the attention it deserves. This originally ran in July of 2018.

Jeff Lemire has been writing Bloodshot across various series for a long time. Longer, even, than I have been reading. Two days ago, I picked up the first volume of Bloodshot Reborn as despite reading from around the eighth issue of the series on, I had never actually read the opening to the series. The blurb on the back of this book gives you a pretty good idea of the book’s plot, but what it doesn’t do is tell you that this book is so much more than your typical superhero story.

Bloodshot’s nanites made him a nearly unstoppable killing machine. His enhanced strength, speed, endurance, and healing made him the perfect weapon, and he served his masters at Project Rising Spirit — a private contractor trafficking in violence — very well. Now, Bloodshot is a shadow of his former self. He lives in self-imposed exile, reeling from the consequences of his past life and the recent events that nearly drove him mad. But when a rash of shootings by gunmen who appear to look just like Bloodshot begin, his guilt will send him on a mission to stop the killers, even if it means diving head-long into the violence that nearly destroyed him.

Picking up after the events of The Valiant (expect spoilers for that book if you haven’t read it), Colorado opens with a monologue telling you who Bloodshot was juxtaposed against images in stark contrast to who he is now. Lemire wastes no tie in showing you that a  man who was forced to kill for others has, seemingly, wasted his opportunity at a second chance for a normal life. Within a page or two, you’re hitting rock bottom with the man formerly known as Bloodshot. You can feel his guilt and shame emanating  from the paper as you turn the page, and not once do you blame him for what he’s going through.

This is a man who was broken, and who doesn’t know how to move past what he was. Who woke up from a nightmare only to understand that he was the monster, and now wears the question of whether he deserves to move on as an armour.

Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado is an origin story, of sorts, for Ray Garrison. Which means you don’t need to have read Bloodshot prior to picking up this comic (and, really, although the first series post Valiant relaunch is good, it pales in comparison to the more psychological horror take on the character that Lemire presents us with). This first volume in the series is a brilliant read; I devoured it in one sitting and immediately wanted to read more. I am a huge fan of Jeff Lemire, and think his take on the character is a vastly underrated one when looked at in the grand scheme of the comics read world.

Lemire’s take on Bloodshot is my favourite version of the character, but the opening of his story takes more from the horror genre than one would initially expect. The character’s inner turmoil is obvious and very clear to the reader as Ray Garrison struggles to discover who he is now that he’s no longer a monster; and his biggest fear, and one he must confront as the volume progresses, is that he’s nobody. Without the monster, he is a shell of a man.

Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado is a book I can’t speak highly enough of (were this a review I’d be giving it a solid 10; the art is every bit as impressive as the story), and it genuinely surprised me that I hadn’t heard much about it prior to reading it myself. Maybe that was part of the magic, that unexpected kick in the teeth, but this first volume of Bloodshot Reborn needs to find its place on your shelf – whether physical or digital.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Preview: Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection SC

Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection SC

Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Brian Holguin, Joshua Dysart, and Matthew Dow Smith
Artist: Brian Froud, Alex Sheikman, and Lizzy John
Letterers: Derron Bennett, Dave Lanphaer
Cover Artist: Brian Froud
Price: $39.99

Collected for the first time in one oversized edition, this series reveals the definitive origins of the Skeksis, Mystics, Gelfling, and the Dark Crystal itself while introducing all new characters in an epic spanning thousands of years.

Written by Brian Holguin (Spawn: Origins), Joshua Dysart (Unknown Soldier), and Matthew Dow Smith (Doctor Who), and lushly illustrated by Alex Sheikman (Robotika) and Lizzy John (Fraggle Rock), Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths  is a breathtaking return to the fantasy world that has captivated audiences for over thirty years.

Jim Henson's The Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection SC

Preview: Jim Henson’s Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection HC

Jim Henson’s Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection HC

Publisher: Archaia, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer:  Brian Holguin, Joshua Dysart, and Matthew Dow Smith
Artist: Brian Froud, Alex Sheikman, and Lizzy John
Letterers: Deron Bennett, Dave Lanphear
Cover Artist: Brian Froud
Price: $39.99

Collected for the first time in one oversized edition, this series reveals the definitive origins of the Skeksis, Mystics, Gelfling, and the Dark Crystal itself while introducing all new characters in an epic spanning thousands of years.

Written by Brian Holguin (Spawn: Origins), Joshua Dysart (Unknown Soldier), and Matthew Dow Smith (Doctor Who), and lushly illustrated by Alex Sheikman (Robotika) and Lizzy John (Fraggle Rock), Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths is a breathtaking return to the fantasy world that has captivated audiences for over thirty years.

Jim Henson's Dark Crystal Creation Myths: The Complete Collection HC

Underrated: Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado (Redux)

This is a column that focuses on something or some things from the comic book sphere of influence that may not get the credit and recognition it deserves. Whether that’s a list of comic book movies, ongoing comics, or a set of stories featuring a certain character. The columns may take the form of a bullet pointed list, or a slightly longer thinkpiece – there’s really no formula for this other than whether the things being covered are Underrated in some way. This week: Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado


bs colorado.jpg

I wanted to revisit this book, because I’ve recently reread and still don’t think it gets the attention it deserves. This originally ran in July of 2018.

Jeff Lemire has been writing Bloodshot across various series for a long time. Longer, even, than I have been reading. Two days ago, I picked up the first volume of Bloodshot Reborn as despite reading from around the eighth issue of the series on, I had never actually read the opening to the series. The blurb on the back of this book gives you a pretty good idea of the book’s plot, but what it doesn’t do is tell you that this book is so much more than your typical superhero story.

Bloodshot’s nanites made him a nearly unstoppable killing machine. His enhanced strength, speed, endurance, and healing made him the perfect weapon, and he served his masters at Project Rising Spirit — a private contractor trafficking in violence — very well. Now, Bloodshot is a shadow of his former self. He lives in self-imposed exile, reeling from the consequences of his past life and the recent events that nearly drove him mad. But when a rash of shootings by gunmen who appear to look just like Bloodshot begin, his guilt will send him on a mission to stop the killers, even if it means diving head-long into the violence that nearly destroyed him.

Picking up after the events of The Valiant (expect spoilers for that book if you haven’t read it), Colorado opens with a monologue telling you who Bloodshot was juxtaposed against images in stark contrast to who he is now. Lemire wastes no tie in showing you that a  man who was forced to kill for others has, seemingly, wasted his opportunity at a second chance for a normal life. Within a page or two, you’re hitting rock bottom with the man formerly known as Bloodshot. You can feel his guilt and shame emanating  from the paper as you turn the page, and not once do you blame him for what he’s going through.

This is a man who was broken, and who doesn’t know how to move past what he was. Who woke up from a nightmare only to understand that he was the monster, and now wears the question of whether he deserves to move on as an armour.

Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado is an origin story, of sorts, for Ray Garrison. Which means you don’t need to have read Bloodshot prior to picking up this comic (and, really, although the first series post Valiant relaunch is good, it pales in comparison to the more psychological horror take on the character that Lemire presents us with). This first volume in the series is a brilliant read; I devoured it in one sitting and immediately wanted to read more. I am a huge fan of Jeff Lemire, and think his take on the character is a vastly underrated one when looked at in the grand scheme of the comics read world.

Lemire’s take on Bloodshot is my favourite version of the character, but the opening of his story takes more from the horror genre than one would initially expect. The character’s inner turmoil is obvious and very clear to the reader as Ray Garrison struggles to discover who he is now that he’s no longer a monster; and his biggest fear, and one he must confront as the volume progresses, is that he’s nobody. Without the monster, he is a shell of a man.

Bloodshot Reborn: Colorado is a book I can’t speak highly enough of (were this a review I’d be giving it a solid 10; the art is every bit as impressive as the story), and it genuinely surprised me that I hadn’t heard much about it prior to reading it myself. Maybe that was part of the magic, that unexpected kick in the teeth, but this first volume of Bloodshot Reborn needs to find its place on your shelf – whether physical or digital.


Join us next week when we look at something else that is, for whatever reason, Underrated.

Almost American
« Older Entries