Tag Archives: danny miki

Batman #86 and Doomsday Clock #12 Sell Out and Go Back to Press

DC Comics has announced that both Batman #86 and Doomsday Clock #12 have sold out and are going back for a second printing. Both will be available January 29.

With “City of Bane” over, Batman #86 kicks off a new direction from a new creative team.

Writer James Tynion IV, artist Tony S. Daniel, inker Danny Miki, colorist Tomeu Morey, and letterer Clayton Cowles take things over beginning “Their Dark Designs.”

Batman #86

Doomsday Clock is over and the finale has sold out. Geoff Johns, Gary Frank, Brad Anderson, and Rob Leigh deliver an epic showdown between Superman and Doctor Manhattan and this is your chance to check out how it all ends!

Doomsday Clock #12

Preview: Batman #86

Batman #86

(W) James Tynion IV (A) Danny Miki (A/CA) Tony S. Daniel
In Shops: Jan 08, 2020
SRP: $3.99

It’s a new day in Gotham City, but not the same old Batman. With Bane vanquished and one of his longtime allies gone, Batman has to start picking up the pieces and stepping up his game. Batman has a new plan for Gotham City, but he’s not the only one. Deathstroke has returned as well, under a mysterious new contract that could change everything.

Beginning a whole new chapter in the life of the Dark Knight, the epic art team of Tony S. Daniel and Danny Miki are joined by new series writer James Tynion IV!

Batman #86

Wonder Woman and The Flash Return to Legacy Numbering in 2020 Starting with #750

Following the blockbuster 750th issues of The Flash and Wonder Woman, new adventures of The Fastest Man Alive and the Amazon warrior princess will keep the momentum going throughout 2020, as DC announced plans to return both titles to Legacy numbering, beginning with Wonder Woman #750 on January 22, Wonder Woman #751 on February 12, Wonder Woman #752 on February 25, Wonder Woman #753 on March 11 and Wonder Woman #754 on March 25. February 26 also sees the release of The Flash #750, with issue #751 following on March 11 and #752 on March 25.

In March, Princess Diana begins a new adventure with issue #753, written by Steve Orlando with art by Max Raynor, main cover by Robson Rocha and Danny Miki and variant cover by Jae Lee. Wonder Woman and a new warrior named Valda agree to put aside their differences to hunt a mythical beast bent on destroying all of Boston. Issue #754 takes Wonder Woman off-world to help Princess Maxima, the former ruler of Almerac, retake her throne and restore the planet’s peaceful matriarchy.

In The Flash #751, Writer Joshua Williamson continues “The Flash Age” saga as Barry Allen’s newest nemesis, Paradox enlists the aid of Godspeed to erase The Flash from existence. Williamson is joined by artist Rafa Sandoval, with main cover by Howard Porter and a variant cover by Junggeun Yoon.

Fan-favorite artist Porter returns on interiors for March 25th issue #752, where Barry has been exiled to Paradox’s realm, outside time and space, where he’s confronted by the ghosts of his past.

DC Releases a Sneak Peek at Batman #86 with Colors by Tomeu Morey

Batman #86

Written by James Tynion IV
Interior and Cover art by Tony Daniel, Danny Miki, and Tomeu Morey
In Shops: Jan 08, 2020

A plague of assassins descend upon Gotham City…

A whole new chapter in the life of the Dark Knight starts soon as the epic art team of Tony S. Daniel, Danny Miki and Tomeu Morey are joined by new series writer James Tynion IV! Check out Tomeu Morey’s colors over Tony Daniel and Danny Miki’s pencils and inks from January 2020’s Batman #86!

It’s a new day for Gotham City—and for Batman. With Bane vanquished and Alfred gone, Batman has to pick up the pieces and step up his game. But he’s not the only one with a new plan for Gotham: Deathstroke has returned, under a mysterious new contract that could change everything. Why are Super-Villains assembling in Gotham City?

Batman #86

DC Releases an Early Look at Batman #85 and Batman #86

Batman #85

Written by James Tynion IV
Art by Guillem March and Tomeu Morey
Lettering by Clayton Cowles
In Shops: Dec 18, 2019

Batman #86

Written by James Tynion IV
Interior and Cover art by Tony Daniel, Danny Miki, and Tomeu Morey
In Shops: Jan 08, 2020

It’s a new day in Gotham City.

It’s a new day for Gotham City—and for Batman. With Bane vanquished and Alfred gone, Batman has to pick up the pieces and step up his game. But he’s not the only one with a new plan for Gotham: Deathstroke has returned, under a mysterious new contract that could change everything. 

A whole new chapter in the life of the Dark Knight starts January 8th, 2020, as the epic art team of Tony S. Daniel, Danny Miki and Tomeu Morey are joined by new series writer James Tynion IV! Here’s your first look at Tony Daniel and Danny Miki’s interior pages from Batman #86, as well as a sneak peek at Tynion’s kick-off to 2020’s Batman run by Guillem March, Tomeu Morey and Clayton Cowles, a three-page story in Batman #85, on sale December 18th.

Review: Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1

Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1

Blackest Night was one of my first major events reading DC Comics. I was a diehard fan of Green Lantern and the idea of the Black rings and new Corps was something that got me excited to see what would happen. It was a big deal bringing back long-dead characters and delivering some major ones into various Lantern Corps. It was also about hope in many ways. Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 takes that ionic story and delivers a much bleaker take.

Writer Tim Seeley delivers an interesting story that expands upon events and has Sinestro keeping the power of the White Lantern to himself. It’s his selfishness that causes the heroes to lose and Nekron’s undead army to spread. With just a few heroes left, things don’t look good.

Seeley does a solid job of delivering a story that isn’t just a twist on something we’ve seen but instead expands upon it. Where he takes it has ups and downs and an ending I didn’t see coming. He mixes hope and despair and leaves us an ending that feels very Planet of the Apes.

The art by Kyle Hotz is where I think the comic lacks. There’s something about the style that doesn’t click for me. Dexter Vines, Walden Wong, and Danny Miki provide ink. David Baron and Allen Passalqua provide color. Tom Napolitano handles the lettering. While some might like the visual style of the comic, it’s just not my cup of tea. At times what’s presented is too much and not clear. At its heart, this is a zombie tale and you need to mix scares with gore and this doesn’t deliver that because at times it’s hard to tell what’s going on. Add in familiar characters who look like boardwalk caricatures of themselves and the final result just doesn’t work.

Tales from the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1 is the weakest of the line of comics released so far. It’s not bad in any way but it also has enough flaws and yawns the comic is a bit forgettable. There was a lot of potential here and while there’s some original concepts the final result is a bit of a letdown.

It does its best to not fall into the zombie tropes but the comic could have used more of it. There’s also some good in Sinestro’s failures. But add in Lobo, Dove, and Mister Miracle and you’ve got a comic that’s not quite sure what it wants to be.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Kyle Hotz
Ink: Dexter Vines, Walden Wong, Danny Miki
Color: David Baron, Allen Passalqua Letterer: Tom Napolitano
Story: 7.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Superman: Year One #3

Superman: Year One #3

Superman: Year One #3 wraps up the DC Black Label series with story and art by Frank Miller and John Romita, Jr. It’s a “year one” story that doesn’t really feel like “year one” at all and takes place over numerous years of Superman’s life. So, the title is the first perplexing thing about the series as well as the issue.

Superman: Year One #3 feels disjointed too. It just moves on from Clark living in Atlantis, never to really dive into that storyline again. There’s military just attacking him. Luthor just reaching out to him. Apparently a love interest in Wonder Woman. It’s all over the place with leaps in facts.

Again, it’s also not “year one.”

The comic feels a bit rushed wanting to hit certain beats like Superman questioning his battle and humanity and his meeting Batman and Wonder Woman. Whether that connects in a flowing narrative is another thing.

The art by Romita, Jr. and Miller have their styles and flair and some works and some doesn’t. In some scenes Superman’s cape is stiff as a board and positioning makes little sense. In other scenes it flows majestically and looks great. It’s just all over the place in details and comes off at times as stiff.

Superman: Year One started with promise but has slid downhill from there. While the finale isn’t quite the cringe-worthy wtf release that was the second issue, it’s also choppy enough to make you wonder if you’re missing pages. One step forward, two leaps back.

Story: Frank Miller, John Romita, Jr. Art: Frank Miller, John Romita, Jr.
Ink: Danny Miki Color: Alex Sinclair Letterer: John Workman
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Preview: Superman: Year One #3

Superman: Year One #3

(W) Frank Miller (A) John Romita, Jr., Danny Miki (CA) Frank Miller
In Shops: Oct 16, 2019
SRP: $7.99

It’s the jaw-dropping conclusion to Frank Miller and John Romita Jr.’s blockbuster reimagining of Superman’s origin! In this final chapter, Clark Kent arrives in Metropolis, the city where he will fulfill his heroic destiny. Witness the first meeting between Superman and Lois Lane, the beginnings of Clark Kent’s career at the Daily Planet, and the birth of his rivalry with Lex Luthor. But when The Joker arrives on the scene, the Man of Steel must enlist the help of his two strange new friends: Wonder Woman and Batman!

Superman: Year One #3

A First Look at Tales From the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night #1

TALES FROM THE DARK MULTIVERSE: BLACKEST NIGHT #1

Written by Tim Seeley
Pencils by Kyle Hotz
Inks by Dexter Vines, Danny Miki, Walden Wong
Colors by David Baron and Allen Passaelaqua
Cover by Lee Weeks
On Sale November 13

Blackest Night is the Next DC Event to Feel the Corruption of the Dark Multiverse!

Tales of the Dark Multiverse: Blackest Night retells the tale of the Green Lantern event that changed the DC Universe forever, only this time the Black Lanterns emerge triumphant! Twenty-three days after the cataclysm, Sinestro, trapped between life and death as a White and a Black Lantern, emerges as the world’s last hope—the Limbo Lantern – against the threat of not only a horde of Black Lantern-infected New Gods, but Darkseid himself, also infested with the Black Lantern’s evil power.

In order to save the universe or end his life, Sinestro will need the help of some unlikely survivors—Dove, Lobo, and Mister Miracle—all of whom will put their lives on the line to give their world one final chance!

TALES FROM THE DARK MULTIVERSE: BLACKEST NIGHT #1

Review: Year of the Villain: Joker #1

Year of the Villain: Joker #1

In general, I haven’t paid too much attention to DC’s Year of the Villain. As a concept, it hasn’t really jumped out to me. But, with John Carpenter writing Year of the Villain: Joker, I had to check it out.

The Joker, and his new companion the Six of Hearts, run around Gotham with the Joker attempting to get his groove back. But how does he go about that?

Carpenter is joined by Anthony Burch on writing duties and the story is rather entertaining. There’s an interesting focus on the insanity of the Joker from the perspective of someone else. Carpenter and Burch capture the humor of the Joker. There’s a playful randomness about it all that keeps readers on their toys.

It’s not all smooth. The comic is a bit of a drag to stat but as the story gets going to entertainment factor ups and goes into overdrive when the Joker crosses path with another villain at a convenient store.

The art is a bit mixed. Philip Tan handles the pencils with Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, and Tan on ink. Jay David Ramos handles the colors. The art towards the beginning of the comic doesn’t feel like the same as what’s at the end. It’s a weird shift. At first, I disliked the art but by the end, I really enjoyed it, especially when Joker does his dynamic duo impersonation. The detail of saggy costumes is fantastic.

Year of the Villain: Joker #1 is a bit mixed for me. I started off hating it but by the end found myself really enjoying it and my opinion completely changed. Where I struggled to start I flew through the end. I almost stopped reading it at one point. But, by the end, glad I didn’t. The comic doesn’t have the insight I’d hope from Carpenter’s writing but it has his humor. Even if you’re not interested in the “Year of the Villain,” this is a comic you can pick up and enjoy.

Story: John Carpenter, Anthony Burch Art: Philip Tan
Ink: Marc Deering, Danny Miki, Jonathan Glapion, Philip Tan
Color: Jay David Ramos
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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