Tag Archives: Daniela Miwa

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Nominees for the 32nd Annual GLAAD Media Awards Announced

GLAAD Media Awards

GLAAD has announced the nominees for the 32nd Annual GLAAD Media Awards. The awards honor media for “fair, accurate, and inclusive representations of LGBTQ people and issues”. The awards began in 1990 and this year features 198 nominees in 28 categories.

Award recipients will be announced during a virtual ceremony scheduled for April 2021.

Below are the nominees in the comic category. You can get the full list of nominees at the GLAAD website.

The Old Guard, based on the comic series by Greg Rucka, Leandro Fernández, Daniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne was nominated for “Outstanding Film – Wide Release“.

Harley Quinn, the HBO MAX/DC Universe animated series based on the DC Comics character created by Bruce Timm and Paul Dini was nominated in “Outstanding Comedy Series“.

Supergirl, based on the DC Comics character, Wynonna Earp based on the character created by Beau Smith, and The Umbrella Academy based on the comic by Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá were nominated for “Outstanding Drama Series”.

Outstanding Comic Book

  • Empyre, Lords of Empyre: Emperor Hulkling, Empyre: Aftermath Avengers, written by Al Ewing, Dan Slott, Chip Zdarsky, Anthony Oliveira, Valerio Schiti, Manuel Garcia, (Marvel Comics)
  • Far Sector, written by N.K. Jemisin, Jamal Campbell, and Deron Bennett (DC Comics)
  • Guardians of the Galaxy, written by Al Ewing and Marcio Takara (Marvel Comics)
  • Juliet Takes a Breath, written by Gabby Rivera and Celia Moscote (BOOM! Studios)
  • Lois Lane, written by Greg Rucka, Juan Cabal, and Mike Perkins (DC Comics)
  • The Magic Fish, written by Trung Le Nguyen (Random House Graphic)
  • Suicide Squad, written by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo (DC Comics)
  • Wynd, written by James Tynion IV and Michael Dialynas (BOOM! Studios)
  • X-Factor, written by Leah Williams and David Baldeon (Marvel Comics)
  • You Brought Me the Ocean, written by Alex Sanchez and Julie Maroh (DC Comics)

Movie Review: The Old Guard

The Old Guard

The Old Guard‘s concept is pretty simple. A group of immortals walks the Earth as a pack of mercenaries and an evil corporation wants to find out what makes them tick and develop a new drug from their gift. A new immortal is discovered and dragged into their shadowy world. Based on the comic series by Greg RuckaLeandro FernándezDaniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne, and published by Image Comics. The film stars Charlize TheronKiKi Layne, and Chiwetel Ejiofor, and is written by Rucka and directed by Gina Prince-Bythwood.

There’s a lot of fantastic elements to The Old Guard. Most of those concepts get a little bit of depth but all feel like there could be so much more done with all of the elements. But, even with that, the film is beyond enjoyable with some fantastic action sequences (not enough of them really) and some solid character connections.

Lets go through bits of the film to discuss what does and doesn’t work:


The relationships – This is one of the best aspects of the film. The team is hundreds of years old and that’s a key aspect of so many members of the team. They have either formed bonds with each other or long for the loss of their friends and family of the past. Two team members are in a rather mature/different type of relationship having bonded over centuries. Team members have died (yes immortals can die) and then there’s the loss of family. It’s all on the table and the actors deliver the pain and love you’d expect in each situation.

The goal of the “evil” corporation – The evil corporation wants to use whatever genetic gift that keeps these individuals alive for medical purposes. Though they go about it in an evil way, and probably would do evil corporate things, the overall goal isn’t too out there. There’s something to debate about possibly being able to save the world but not doing so. There’s also moral debates about testing on these individuals since they can survive the testing in theory.

Choices weigh down on characters – The body count rises throughout the film and the idea of the blood on the hands of the immortals is a feature. There’s the concept of fighting their way through life. There’s the idea of living with family for as long as they can before their immortality is realized. It’s an interesting balance and discussion of choice of actions. The concept of killing one is difficult enough but also think about that body count rising over decades? Try to figure out what you’d do knowing you’ll see your friends and family die? Do you spend it with them? Or, do you run?

The theme of the film – The film ends in an interesting way. It’s not a spoiler to say the film is about leaving a footprint. Early in the film, there are moments that touch upon these individuals attempting to stay anonymous but the bigger question thing isn’t their anonymity but instead their impact for the better. That plays deeply into why the evil corporation wants them


There’s absolutely issues to the film. It foreshadows things a bit too much. You can predict what’s coming down the road with a bit too much easy. It doesn’t diminish the story at all and there’s reasons the foreshadowing happens, to explain the world and rules, but still, it feels a bit forced and a bit too obvious.

The Old Guard is an entertaining film that doesn’t use its twist in too many ways to make the concept not seem interesting. It also adds just enough reasons as to why it doesn’t. It’s the rare action film that has some moral questions underneath and themes to it that makes it a bit more than the fantastic action sequences. It would absolutely work better as an extended television series but from everything teased it looks like we’ll be getting more of the film series down the road. Here’s hoping as it’s an enjoyable two hours to kick back and relax to.

Overall Rating: 8.0

The Old Guard Gets a Second Trailer

The Old Guard has a new trailer. The Netflix film is an adaptation of the series by Greg Rucka, Leandro Fernández, Daniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne, and published by Image Comics. The film stars Charlize Theron, KiKi Layne, and Chiwetel Ejiofor, and is written by Rucka and directed by Gina Prince-Bythwood.

TKO’s Second Wave of Comics is Now Available

TKO Studios burst upon the comic book scene last December with a bold new strategy to binge-release entire miniseries in both collectors box sets and trade paperbacks. Their first wave of books included series by some of comics’ best writers and artists.

TKO has released their second wave of books. The titles include:

SENTIENT

Written by Jeff Lemire (Black Hammer) and drawn by Gabriel Walta (The Vision)

When a separatist attack kills every adult on board a colony ship in deep space, it is up to VALERIE, the on-board A.I., to help the ship’s children survive. But as they are pursued by dangerous forces, can Valerie become more than what she was programmed to be — a savior to these children?

SENTIENT

THE BANKS

Written by Roxane Gay (Black Panther: World of Wakanda), drawn by Ming Doyle (The Kitchen), and colored by Jordie Bellaire (Redlands)

Chicago, Southside. For fifty years the women of the Banks family have been the most successful thieves in the city by following one simple rule: Get in. Get away. Get paid. Never get greedy.

THE BANKS

POUND FOR POUND

Written by Natalie Chaidez (Queen of the South), drawn by Andy Belanger (Southern Cross), and Daniela Miwa (The Fearsome Doctor Fang)

MMA fighter Dani Libra fears nothing… except for her recurring blackouts and fractured memories that obscure a bloody past. When her sister is kidnapped, Dani must shine a light on the darkness in her own mind. But can she keep her own demons at bay for long enough to save her sister?

POUND FOR POUND

EVE OF EXTINCTION

Written by Sal and Steven Simeone, drawn by Nik Virella (Deadpool) and Isaac Goodhart (Under the Moon: A Catwoman Tale), and Ruth Redmond (Amazing Spider-Man)

The rain brought something. Something that changed the men. In order to reach their stranded daughter, two mothers must survive the hurricane, and the horrors it unleashed. But can they work together long enough to save their daughter in a world where all men have become monsters?

EVE OF EXTINCTION

 Each first issue of every mini-series is free to read at TKOpresents.com.

Review: The Old Guard #1

oldguard1coverThe Old Guard #1 is Highlander meets the modern world of private contractors as a group of immortals have banded together to be a Blackwater type group of mercenaries, but with a conscience it seems. Writer Greg Rucka and artist Leandro Fernandez kick the issue off with a deep look into the pain of the Old Guard’s only female member, Andromeda (Andy), before sending them headlong into action to rescue some hostages in South Sudan. Fernandez and colorist Daniela Miwa are unyielding when showing the violence of Andy and her team’s life as the issue erupts into a conflagration of guns, bullets, blood, brain matter, and yes, a battle axe.

The opening of The Old Guard reminded me a lot of the Queen song “Who Wants to Live Forever”, but with the bombast replaced with grit and pain. Miwa switches up the color palette on each panel to show the passing of time while Rucka and Fernandez connect sex and violence showing Andy’s various lovers and kill targets over the ages. She is caught in a vicious cycle and just wants something new or to break what has become tedium. Hopefully, a mission to rescue some young girls in South Sudan will break this up, but foreshadowing dialogue and a hyper-violent flashback to the Old Guard’s last mission for their client Copley in Afghanistan show that this isn’t a simple mission.

The action in The Old Guard reminded me of The Hurt Locker by way of the John Wick 2 films. There is kind of a dance like precision to Andy slashing through her foes with a battle axe, and her comrades taking targets out with well aimed sniper shots on the other side of the page. Fernandez and Miwa stuff the page with sound effects and panels stacked on panels to imitate the danger and intensity of real combat. Yeah, the Old Guard can take a barrage of bullets and still walk out alive because they’re immortals, but there are forces beyond soldiers and guns at odds against at them that Rucka and Fernandez hint at the end of the story.

theoldguardinterior

The Old Guard #1 is a story about the futility of immortality told through the lens of soldiers. And a soldier, especially a mercenary like Andy, is a good choice because she has seen the rise and fall of countless nations and ideologies and can truly ponder if there’s any meaning to it all. Except she spends most of the issue talking about her rescue mission and using military related jargon to ensure it runs smoothly while also avoiding the abyss of her existence. However, the abyss returns at the end of the story in a cynical bit of a twist that instantly expands the scope and mythos of the series. The Old Guard occasionally can be a lean action comic in the recent Warren Ellis tradition, especially with Fernandez and Miwa’s punch-y visuals, but it seems like it will have interweaving and complex storylines and mythologies like most of Rucka’s works, such as Wonder Woman, Lazarus, Black Magick, and even Stumptown albeit in a very different genre and setting.

The Old Guard #1 is a bleak, biting action comic about an immortal woman, who is a skilled warrior, yet filled with sadness drawn and colored with gritty precision by Leandro Fernandez and Daniela Miwa. Andy’s conscience, snark, and total competence make her a likable lead character, and a slight twist at the end sets up a decent enough hook to pick up the following issue where hopefully the other members of her team will be fleshed out by Greg Rucka and Fernandez.

Story: Greg Rucka Art: Leandro Fernandez Colors: Daniela Miwa
Story: 7.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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