Tag Archives: damian duffy

Review: Octavia Butler’s Kindred

kindredgraphiccoverTime Travel has always been an interesting way to look at characters. This the reason why Back To The Future, is so relatable, as one decision in that story has repercussions and thereby making the right one is paramount to everything. Then there is HG Wells The Time Machine, which is a character study at its most base, where you realize man is and will always be the same good and bad. The last example, that most reverberates, is probably Dickens A Christmas Carol, whereby time travel is accomplished through paranormal means.

The one thing that threads all these examples together, is the fact that they barely have characters which possess melanin. When they do like it in Back to the Future, is they are mostly background characters, or plot devices, like  Mayor Goldy, to illustrate what certain choices yield. Rarely, has time travel been ideal for people of color, in science fiction, as one could only believe that they may have not existed during those times, which history refutes time and time again. One example in science fiction, that comes to mind, is a 1993 movie by Haile Gerima, called Sankofa, where a model times travels to slavery times.

Enter Octavia Butler, whose is an iconoclast in the science fiction world, and though she passed in 2006, her words live on and more so, in works like these. In Kindred, as the synopsis sums up:

Dana, a modern black woman, is celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her new husband when she is abruptly snatched from her home in California and transported to the ante-bellum South. Rufus, the white son of a plantation owner, has summoned her across time to save him from drowning. After this first summons, she is drawn back, again and again, to protect Rufus and ensure he will grow to manhood and father the daughter who will become Dana’s ancestor. Each time she arrives in the past, Dana’s sojourns will become more and more dangerous because of Rufus’ obsessive need for her. The reader never knows whether she will survive one journey or the next. It’s only when she finally must save herself from rape by killing Rufus that she is finally freed from the pull of the past.

As I remember reading this book when I was 13, and had not picked it up since, but this adaptation, brought all those goosebumps, back all at once. By story’s end, the reader has been taken on a ride, realizing things about themselves as well as the need for empathy in the human race.

Overall, when it comes to adaptations, this more than captures the spirit, pushes it to new heights. Damian Duffy deftly gets every message Butler was conveying and gets why this book has been a cornerstone, to every Octavia Butler fan. John Jennings‘ illustrations leap off the page, tugging at the reader’s heartstrings, at the right beats and not flinching when most artists would. Altogether, a strong adaptation, which not only met expectations but makes one fall in love with story all over again.

Story: Damian Duffy Art: John Jennings
Story:10 Art: 10 Overall: 10 Recommendation: Buy NOW!!!!!!

SDCC 2016: Magnetic Press Partners with Jennings & Duffy for Black Comix Panel

Magnetic Press has partnered with 2016 Eisner Award Nominee & Harvard Fellow John Jennings (The Blacker the Ink, Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred), and Glyph Comics Award winner Dr. Damian Duffy (Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred, Other Heroes) to co-present the San Diego 2016’s panel, BLACK COMIX: AFRICAN AMERICAN INDEPENDENT COMICS PUBLISHING. The panel features an all-star lineup of comic creator heavy weights, including Ron Wimberly, David Walker, Ashley A. Woods, Jeremy Love, & Robert Love.

Magnetic Press, Jennings & Duffy will be making more official announcements at the panel, where they will reveal more about their partnership. The panel will be held on Saturday, July 23rd from 8:00-9:00pm in Room 28 DE, and will be will be co-moderated by Jennings & Duffy.  Magnetic Press teased the title image by Ashley A. Woods, which hints at announcements to be made during the panel.

This marks Magnetic Press’ 3rd consecutive appearance at San Diego Comic-Con since the publisher’s debut three years ago at SDCC 2014. Magnetic Press can be found at booth #5534.

Black Comix Returns: African American Independent Comic Publishing
Saturday July 23, 2016 8:00pm – 9:00pm
Room 28DE

Join 2016 Eisner nominee & Harvard University Fellow John Jennings (The Blacker the Ink) and Damian Duffy (Octavia E. Butler’s Kindred), as they offer real talk about race and representation in independent comics publishing with the likes of 2016 Eisner nominee Ron Wimberly (Slave Punk, Prince of Cats), David Walker (Power Man & Iron Fist, Shaft), Ashley A. Woods (Niobe), Robert Love (Alpha Girl, S.P.O.O.K.S.), and Jeremy Love (Bayou, Fierce).

unnamed

Black Comix: African American Independent Comics, Art, and Culture


Bookmark and Share

Later this month John Jennings and Damian Duffy will be releasing an anthology, Black Comix: African American Independent Comics, Art, and Culture, that showcases independent African American cartoonists and the subculture of conventions, websites, and awards surrounding them.

Duffy and Jennings met at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where Jennings is a professor of graphic design and Duffy was a graduate student at the time and is currently a PhD candidate.  Their first collaboration was The Hole a sci-fi graphic novel which dealt with “issues of identity and consumer culture.”  They then followed that up with two art exhibits which focused on African American comic creators.

The contacts they made at these two shows lead to the graphic novel which serves as an introduction to this area of comic book culture.  People featured in it include Dawud Anyabwile, the creator of Brotherman, Keith Knight, the author of The K Chronicles who wrote the introduction, Turtel Onli the creator of NOG: The Protector of the Pyramids, Sustah-Girl: The Queen of the Black Age, and Malcolm-10, and up and coming artists like Ashley A. Woods the creator of Millennia Wars and Arie Monroe.

The book also focuses on the history and nature of the Black independent comics community and the subcultures that orbit it.   Online you can find some of that history and community in the The Museum of Black Superheroes which was founded by Omar Bilal.

Black Comix