Tag Archives: cyborg: rebirth

Cyborg Fights Every Cybernetic Villain in Rebirth

Victor Stone is a hero for the modern age, so it’s about time he joined Rebirth! In this DC All Access comics clip, they talk to writer John Semper about Cyborg’s new solo series, which kicks off this week in Cyborg: Rebirth #1. What mysterious new villain will Cyborg be battling? Can we expect any appearances by the Justice League? And most intriguing of all, where does the human end and machine begin when it comes to our cybernetic hero?

Around the Tubes

Rise of the Black Flame #1 CVRThe weekend is almost here! What geeky things do folks have planned? Sound off in the comments below!

While you decided on what you’re doing, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

Around the Tubes

Comics Alliance – #YesHomo: Phil Jimenez On Feminine Design and Industry Change [Flame Con] – Jimenez is always awesome to see what he says.

The Beat – Interview: Alexis Fajardo on Adapting Myths for Modernity in Kid Beowulf: The Blood-Bound Oath – This sounds cool.

Comics Alliance – DC’s Geoff Johns Reveals How ‘Justice League’ Will Address ‘Batman v Superman’ Criticisms – It’ll be interesting to see how it turns out.

 

Around the Tubes Reviews

Newsarama – All-New, All-Different Avengers #14

CBR – Alters #1

ICv2 – Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Vol. 1

Talking Comics – Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Comic Attack – Glitterbomb #1

Nothing But Comics – Kill or Be Killed #2

Talking Comics – Rise of the Black Flame #1

The Beat – Strong Female Protagonist

Talking Comics – Supergirl #1

Preview: Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Written by: John Semper, Jr.
Art by: Tony Kordos, Sandra Hope, Paul Pelletier
Cover by: Will Conrad
Variant cover by: Joe Benitez

Victor Stone was once a star athlete and brilliant student with a bright future. But after a tragic accident destroyed over half of his body, Victor was kept alive by merging flesh with advanced technology. Today he is the Justice League co-founder called Cyborg. But is the young hero a man…or a machine that merely believes it’s a man?

cybreb_cv1_ds

Review: Cyborg: Rebirth #1

cybreb_cv1_dsVictor Stone was once a star athlete and brilliant student with a bright future. But after a tragic accident destroyed over half of his body, Victor was kept alive by merging flesh with advanced technology. Today he is the Justice League co-founder called Cyborg. But is the young hero a man…or a machine that merely believes it’s a man?

Don’t know who Vic Stone is? Cyborg: Rebirth #1 by writer John Semper, Jr., is a decent 101 to catch new readers up on who this character is and his origin. It’s pretty standard stuff and I don’t believe it varies a lot from what we’ve seen, but the emphasis is clearly on the question if this really is Vic in Cyborg or is it a program mimicking him? This seems to be at least the early focus for Semper and the issue builds toward this question and quandary.

In that way the issue allows Semper to put his mark on the character focusing on the technology aspect and whether Cyborg is human or a program mimicking a human?

The art by Paul Pelletier is really good keeping up the look from the pervious volume with help from inks from Tony Kordos and Sandra Hope. What really stands out as far as the art is the the perspective the comic takes in that it has us seeing things at times from Cyborg’s perspective to emphasize the big question of the issue.

The issue ends with clearly the villain that Vic will be up against. I have no idea who that is personally, but the design is cool. The issue as a whole is an interesting one, moving away from a focus on a superhero with a disability to a superhero who may not be human. It’s a switch, but the tone of the comic feels similar to the previous volume. Overall, interesting stuff.

Story: John Semper, Jr. Art: Paul Pelletier Ink: Tony Kordos, Sandra Hope
Story: 7 Art: 7.5 Overall: 7 Recommendation: Read

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

angelcatbird.0Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

We’re bringing back something we haven’t done for a while, what the team thinks. Our contributors are choosing up to five books each week and why they’re choosing the books.

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Alex

Top Pick: A&A: The Aventures Of Archer And Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – The last issue was one of the better ones I’ve read in this series, which is saying a lot when it comes to A&A’s quality.  I’m remarkably excited to get my grubby mitts on this issue.

Angel Catbird Vol.1 (Dark Horse) – The early reviews I’ve read have been very good, which is awesome. Other than the cover and the preview text, I know next to nothing about the TPb other than it’s apparently very good. Sometimes, that’s the only reason you need to read something.

Batman #6 (DC Comics) – Another week, another Batman comic. Strangely, the twice-monthly shipping isn’t bothering me as much as I thought it would… probably because Tom King and David Finch are still going very strong right now.

Moon Knight #6 (Marvel) – I think I must be one of the very few people for whom this series isn’t clicking for. I recognise it’s good, but I’ve been picking it up primarily because of the art, not the quality of the story. But I have faith in Jeff Lemire, and I’ve also found the series has been getting better issue by issue. At some point, the series is going to click for me, and I’m really hoping its here.

Ninjak #19 (Valiant) – Ninjak’s team up with the Eternal Warrior continues here, and it’s a safe bet that any comic featuring the Eternal Warrior will be on my pull list – this comic is no exception. Although not quite as good as Wrath of the Eternal Warrior, this story is only one issue in.

 

Anthony

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Jim Zub has been part of a slew of excellent titles throughout his career, including the current ongoing at Image, Wayward. Glitterbomb looks to be another intriguing concept from Zub with newcomer artist Djibril Morissette-Phan. The premise looks to attack celebrity culture and fame with a twist of horror and violence. Morissette-Phan, whose previewed art, with the colours of K. Michael Russell, makes this series look even more intriguing and gritty.Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and

Kill or Be Killed #2 (Image Comics) – The first issue contained some rather unexpected moments for a series that appeared to be purely grounded in reality. The creative team of Ed Brubaker, Sean Phillips, and Elizabeth Breitweiser are no strangers to implementing supernatural elements (see the fantastic Fatale). Dylan is the front and center vigilante-esque protagonist whose agenda to kill those deemed as scum of the Earth is initiated by a mysterious demon after a failed suicide attempt. It’s too early to tell whether this is more of a projection of the mindset of Dylan or a full on horror element part of the story. Either way, this looks to be another hit title for a team that continues to impress.

Paper Girls #9 (Image Comics) – With another Erin (whom may or may not be one to trust according to the last issue) thrown into the mix, things are getting pretty hectic in the present time. Oh, and there are some gigantic monsters fighting amidst the city.

A&A: The Adventures of Archer and Armstrong #7 (Valiant) – Archer and Armstrong have found themselves amongst a circus troupe of Armstrong doppelgangers as the duo continue their journey to find the immortal’s long-lost wife. A&A continues to be one of the funniest and more entertaining comics on the stands that never fails to be filled with laugh out loud moments.

Kim and Kim #2 (Black Mask Studios) – The first issue of Kim and Kim introduced an energetic and colourful world centered around bounty hunters Kimiko Quatro and Kimber Dantzler. They have propelled themselves forward into the midst of a pretty heavy situation involving a particular bounty that looks to be the driving force for Kim and Kim. With a real punk aesthetic and

 

Shay

This is a damn good week for comic book lovers. Whether you’re into the big boys of DC and Marvel , or the mini majors with an indie edge like Image. It’s about time to get your geek on!

Top Pick: Everafter: From the Pages of Fables #1 (Vertigo) – Full disclosure, I am such a Fables fan that I have a tattoo of the cover of issue #7 on my arm. Of course, I’m hella hyped for something new from the geniuses behind the Fables brand. Here’s to more bad ass ladies, shifty bad guys and what I’m sure will be a fun ride. Philip Willingham himself recommends it and it’s from The Wolf Among Us creators.

Rise of the Black Flame #1 (Dark Horse) – There’s a cult, missing girls, the jungle of Siam! It sounds like an adventure mystery that will give you chills!

Batman Arkham: Poison Ivy TP (DC Comics) – All of Poison Ivy’s ( aka Red) greatest hits and fights against Batman in one place. Who doesn’t like a little female bad assery ?

Color Your Own Women of Power (Marvel) – It’s a fun time and a coloring book for fans. You can now color in ( or out of ) the lines and make your own fantasy costumes for your fave lady superheroes. What’s not to love about the chance to put something functional on your faves?

Glitterbomb #1 (Image Comics) – Looks like it has some promise. Dark forces beyond our control hell bent on tearing down celebrity culture and beauty. Should be a fun read and an interesting series of it plays its cards right and shows us the ugly behind the beauty.

 

Brett

Top Pick: The Sheriff of Babylon #10 (Vertigo) – Hands down the best comic out there right now. It’s entertaining, but also a brutal and honest look at life in Iraq post war. Writer Tom King gives a visceral feel to each issue and artist Mitch Gerads’ art is absolutely amazing in its detail.

Cyborg: Rebirth #1 (DC Comics) – A new creative team takes on Cyborg and I’m really intrigued to see where writer John Semper Jr. takes the character.

Supergirl #1 (DC Comics) – I really enjoyed writer Steve Orlando’s take on the character in his Rebirth issue. He’s clearly focused on the teenage and immigrant aspects of the character and making sure it’s all fun too.

Alters #1 (Aftershock Comics) – I’m intrigued on this one which sees a world where people are changing by gaining powers, but also a new hero is transitioning from male to female at the same time as gaining powers. I hold my breathe hoping this one is a story featuring a transgender character done right, but who knows.

Eclipse #1 (Image Comics) – An interesting concept of a world where sunlight kills people so the survivors are forced to live in nocturnal cities and someone begins to use it as a weapon for murder. Sounds original and intriguing.

 

Preview: Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Cyborg: Rebirth #1

Written by: John Semper, Jr.
Art by: Tony Kordos, Sandra Hope, Paul Pelletier
Cover by: Will Conrad
Variant cover by: Joe Benitez

Victor Stone was once a star athlete and brilliant student with a bright future. But after a tragic accident destroyed over half of his body, Victor was kept alive by merging flesh with advanced technology. Today he is the Justice League co-founder called Cyborg. But is the young hero a man…or a machine that merely believes it’s a man?

CYBREB_Cv1_ds

SDCC 2016: John Semper, Jr. Talks DC Comics’ Cyborg

This September Victor Stone comes to DC ComicsRebirth courtesy of writer John Semper, Jr.

Victor Stone was once a star athlete and brilliant student with a bright future. But after a tragic accident destroyed over half of his body, Victor was kept alive by merging flesh with advanced technology. Today he is the Justice League co-founder called Cyborg. But is the young hero a man…or a machine that merely believes it’s a man?

At San Diego Comic-Con I got a chance to speak with Semper about what we might expect from his take on the character.