Tag Archives: crowded

Review: Crowded #12

Crowded #12

Crowded has always been a comic where everything is turned to 11, constantly. That’s thanks to the witty and occasionally sentimental writing of Christopher Sebela, the high energy art of Ro Stein and Ted Brandt, and the varied colors of Triona Farrell. This high tension applies to action sequences, dramatic backstory reveals, and especially the feelings between the two lead characters. Charlie is the so-called normal girl with a price on her head via crowdfunding app Reapr and Vita is the bodyguard hired via Dfender. Crowded #12 is no exception. Charlie and Vita conspire to break out of the survivalist-meets-MLM cult missile silo they’re trapped in and talk about their emotions too.

Weirdly enough, Crowded has turned into a romance comic in its second year. The unlikely lustfest/romance between Charlie and Vita has really taken center stage. It’s fitting that we get a sepia-colored flashback of their first time making out and sleeping together. I love how Stein and Brandt include Dog’s reaction to their activities. He wanders around the frame eventually finding some nice cheese puffs to munch on. The active nature of their artwork with all kinds of gestures, background jokes, or interesting things to look at along with the contrasting color stories that Farrell created keeps the tense, “will they, won’t they” nature of Charlie and Vita’s relationship an ongoing concern as the plot moves along.

Sebela does this too through his writing. He uses a relatively “quiet” scene of Vita and Charlie preparing to leave the missile silo into the closest thing they’ve had to heart to heart for a while. Their conversation while prepping guns and a big-ass parachute is a little one-sided. Vita wants to know the old companies that Charlie sabotage while Charlie wants to get to know Vita personally. It feeds into Crowded #12’s ongoing thread of Charlie wanting Vita to see her as more than a client, but as someone she can build a future with. This emotionally dynamic beat ends up bleeding into the main plot for maximum suffering and feels.

As the issue progresses, Sebela, Stein, and Brandt indulge in even more dysfunctional relationship tropes. A pet turns out to be the emotional glue of the couple. A character storms off for basically this story universe’s equivalent of a pack of cigarettes. In a very contemporary moment, the disconnect from each other on the app where they found each other. Sebela very much plays into the “downer” second part of a trilogy idea. He wisely applies it to the relationship between Charlie and Vita instead of having them surrounded by armies of money-hungry, wannabe mercenaries.

That kind of spectacle showed up in earlier issues of Crowded. More recent installments have focused on the intricacies of love, lust, work, and relationships. However, Sebela, Stein, Brandt, and Farrell have dialed down the quirky, thrilling bits of the book. The escape from the missile silo is a highlight and example of this comic’s humorous approach to capers and setpieces.

There’s an added bonus of the antagonist, Ophelia, being fleshed out in a fantastic double-page spread. Sebela, Stein, and Brandt create a unique connection between her and Vita. Vita sees a little bit of her own hypercompetence and ability to create plans out of thin air and offers to be a kind of remote mentor to her. As a youngster, Vita was shifted from foster home to foster home with no real adult figure to lean on. She wants to pay that forward and be that figure to Ophelia. It’s a really well-developed subplot and good respite from the Vita and Charlie arguing and sometimes smooching and other things parts.

Crowded #12 is the latest, shining example of a comic that has it all. It features compelling chemistry between lead characters, thrilling plot elements with a dash of humor, engaging visuals, and a color palette that adds depth to characters and the events of the story. Crowded #12 ends on a cliffhanger with an air of menace. I can’t wait to see how Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, Ted Brandt, Triona Farrell, and Cardinal Rae wrap their tale of road trips, romance, and creepy technology in volume 3.

Story: Christopher Sebela Art: Ro Stein, Ted Brandt
Colors: Triona Farrell Letters: Cardinal Rae
Story: 8.6 Art: 9.2 Overall: 8.9 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Logan’s Favorite Comics of 2018

Without further ado, these are my favorite comics of 2018. This was the year I fell back on series that I had been checking out for years and found some new faves in the worlds of newspaper comics, symbiotes, gamma irradiated beasts, and maybe even a choose your own adventure game. Marvel seriously did a 180 this year, and I went from picking zero of their comics on my last year end list to three so well done on their part, and Donny Cates and Al Ewing should receive hefty bonus checks. But, honestly, this list should show you that visual humor, character driven narratives, and weirdness are my things, and I can’t wait to read more comics in that vein in 2019.

Honorable Mentions: Sex Death Revolution (Black Mask), Runaways (Marvel), Assassinistas (IDW/Black Crown), Punks Not Dead (IDW/Black Crown), That one really good issue of Peter Parker, Spider-Man that Chip Zdarsky wrote and drew (Marvel), Gideon Falls (Image)

10.Modern Fantasy  (Dark Horse)

Modern Fantasy is a miniseries about a data entry worker named Sage of the Riverlands, who secretly wants to epic hero or maybe just a curator at a cool museum, and has a penchant for smooching handsome elves. Did Rafer Roberts and Kristen Gudsnuk have access to my most secret thoughts while writing this book? In all seriousness, this comic marries millennial angst and struggles (Dead end jobs, mooching friends, annoying co-workers) with all kinds of fantasy tropes, including urban, high, and good ol’ Lovecraftian. Gudsnuk’s art is both humorous and touching and filled with background details and jokes that reward a close reading. But what makes Modern Fantasy a great comic is the awkward friend group dynamic that Roberts and Gudsnuk craft filled with drama, jokes, a touch of romance, and a final showdown with a fire demon.

9.The Wicked + the Divine (Image)

Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, and Matthew Wilson’s story of young gods and fandom hit some dark bits in 2018 and had plenty of surprises to go with the formalism and “glimpse behind the curtain” of the “Mothering Invention” arc. However, at its best, WicDiv is the story of the girl, who thought she wanted something, and then painfully realized that she didn’t really want it. That girl, of course, is Persephone whose personal journey along with McKelvie’s amazing facial expressions, Gillen’s clever quips, and Wilson’s majestic color palette keeps me returning to this series as it is about to hit its fifth year. Also, the specials were spectacularly glorious in 2018 from the illustrated prose story/murder mystery in 1923 to 1373’s dark piety. Then, there was the absolute bonkers nature of The Funnies  where we find out the origin of Laura’s cracked phone and the Pantheon gets to solve a Scooby Doo mystery courtesy of Kitty Curran and Larissa Zageris.

8.  Nancy (Go Comics)

I’ve been doing year end comics lists for five years, and this is the first time I’ve put a newspaper strip on one. However, Olivia Jaimes’ work on Nancy is one of the most hilarious things to come out of 2018. There are her “millennial” gags (Even though Nancy and Sluggo are definitely Generation Z.) about Nancy’s overuse of the Internet or swapping streaming service passwords with Sluggo, who is also “lit”. But she also has a firm grasp on meta-gags and the uniqueness of the comics medium like playing with panel layouts, lettering styles, reusing panels, and then having Nancy make a joke about it. Nancy is truly a ray of sunshine in a dark landscape while still being sarcastic and self-deprecating as hell and shows that even the proverbial old dog of the newspaper comic can learn some new tricks.

7.  “Milk Wars” (DC Comics/Young Animal)

“Milk Wars” really brought the best of DC Rebirth and Young Animal together and was the only Big Two crossover I kept up with in 2018. The series brings together the Doom Patrol, Mother Panic, Shade the Changing Girl, and Cave Carson to fight warped versions of DC Comics heroes, who are under the control of the Retconn corporation. The story is a literal metaphor for how corporations sanitize characters and go for the retread instead of taking risks with iconic characters as Wonder Woman becomes a submissive housewife in her tie-in story from Cecil Castelluci and Mirka Andolfo. “Milk Wars” shows that it’s okay to be a little weird as milk goes bad if it’s left in the bridge past its expiration day. It also features some gorgeous layouts from Aco in the crossover’s first chapter, which was co-written by Gerard Way and Steve Orlando, and he and the artists did an excellent job of melding an indie and mainstream sensibility throughout “Milk Wars”. Also, the story had a real effect on Mother Panic, Cave Carson, and Shade in their solo titles and introduced Magdalene Visaggio and Sonny Liew’s wonderful, yet depressed Eternity Girl character.

6.Venom (Marvel)

Donny Cates, Ryan Stegman, and Iban Coello’s Venom ongoing series is filled with all the fun excesses of the 1990s (Especially in the Venom Annual where James Stokoe shows him going toe to toe with Juggernaut.) and none of its toxicity. The first arc of the series is about Eddie Brock and his symbiote going to war against Knull, god of the symbiotes and a symbiote dragon. This has a terrible effect on him, and Cates carefully uses the symbiote as a metaphor for PTSD while freeing Stegman to draw unhinged heavy metal battles. And this series wasn’t just a one arc wonder as Cates, Coello, and Stegman explore the after effects of the battle with Knull on Eddie’s symbiote and have him confront his father. Plus one of the most underrated Marvel villains, Ultimate Reed Richards aka the Maker pops up for a little bit. This series work because it explores the psychological effects of the symbiote as well as the oozy, shoot-y violent bits.

5.Crowded (Image)

Crowded is a wicked bit of satire with a side of mismatched buddy adventure from the beautiful minds of Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, Ted Brandt, and Triona Farrell. It is about an obnoxious woman named Charlie, who has a $2 million price on her head on an app called Reapr that is basically crowdfunded murder. Luckily, there’s an app called Defendr where Charlie hires a badass, meticulous, and noble woman named Vita to protect her. Stein and Brandt fill each page with oodles of panels, but you are able to follow every action scene, conversation, or Charlie ending up at the club or a bachelorette party even if she has a price on her head. The bounty hunting drives the plot while Sebela uses the quieter moments to develop the personality and relationships of Charlie and Vita as well as some of the “professionals” hunting them. Crowded is a thrill ride, but also looks at the dark, not so altruistic side of human nature through the Internet and constant connectivity.

4. You Are Deadpool (Marvel)

Al Ewing and Salva Espin’s You Are Deadpool was some of the most fun I had reading a comic book in 2018 beginning with Kieron Gillen showing up in the “tutorial” brandishing a sandwich as a weapon. It’s a combination spoof of different eras of Marvel Comics along with a pretty damn fun and addictive Choose Your Own Adventure Game. In some cases, you don’t even read the issues in order. Ewing and Espin also take cues from some not so table top RPGs and have the moral choices that Deadpool makes effect your reading and playing experience. Having Deadpool interact with both heroes and innocent passerbies during the Silver Age, horror/kung fu/blaxploitation, the edgy 80s, and of course, the good ol’ 90s is hilarious and shows Espin’s versatility as a cartoonist.

3. Archival Quality (Oni)

Archival Quality is a spooky graphic novel by Ivy Noelle Weir and Steenz about a young woman named Cel, who gets a job as an archivist at a medical museum. The comic tenderly explores Cel’s anxiety and depression and unexpected connection with a woman named Celine, who was a patient at the sanatorium that preceded the museum. It isn’t caught up in a fast paced thriller plot, but slowly unveils the mystery while focusing on Cel’s interactions with her boss Abayomi, super rad co-worker Holly, and her declining relationship with her boyfriend Kyle. Archival Quality has real atmosphere, and Steenz creates some fantastic spaces as Cel begins to explore her workplace with its skulls and lack of cellphone service. It is a fantastic story about mental health and relationships through the mystery genre.

2. Giant Days (BOOM! Studios) 

Giant Days continues to be one of life’s true blessings thanks to John Allison, Max Sarin, Liz Fleming, Julia Madrigal, and Whitney Cogar. At this point, we know the characters and their quirks are on fully display, especially when Sarin draws the title because she is a real pro at expressive eyes and touches of surrealism to break up the slice of life. 2018 was full of drama to go with the Giant Days’ comedy as Daisy broke up with her a little too footloose and fancy free girlfriend Ingrid, and Esther missed her shot at being in a relationship with Ed when he begins a romance with Nina, a girl he met while recuperating from a pub related injury. Nina being Australian is the subject of this year holiday’s special, which was a special treat drawn and written by Allison as Ed fends for himself Down Under. Giant Days shows that it’s one of the pre-eminent slice of life comics as it enters its fourth year, and Esther, Daisy, and Susan’s relationships continue to ebb and flow.

1. Immortal Hulk  (Marvel)

I will preface this by saying that the Hulk is one of my least favorite Marvel characters because he’s often used as a simplistic Jekyll/Hyde metaphor. Al Ewing, Joe Bennett, Ruy Jose, Lee Garbett, Martin Simmonds, and Paul Mounts blow that up in Immortal Hulk, which resembles an intelligent horror story rather than a superhero beat ’em up. It’s a road story with Bruce Banner on the run from the monster that comes out, wrecks, and kills when the sun goes down before morphing into a government conspiracy thriller and something more malevolent towards the end. Through cutting narration, Ewing reveals exactly what is going through Banner’s head while Bennett’s art shows the often gruesome effects of his rages. I also like how Ewing humanizes the supporting players from Walter Langkowski, who is struggling with his own monstrous nature to honest reporter Jackie McGee and even his opponent the Absorbing Man.

Immortal Hulk is the best comic of 2018 because it has a compelling plot, is a searing character study of an American pop culture icon, and is an homage to Jack Kirby and Bernie Wrightson while breaking new ground. (See issue 10’s final page.)

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Archie 1941 #1 (Archie Comics) – Archie hasn’t been one to dive into real world issues but this new series takes on the Riverdale kids as the US ramps up for World War II. A great concept that should be something new and interesting.

Cemetery Beach #1 (Image Comics) – Warren Ellis and Jason Howard team up again and the creative team alone has us interested in this series about a professional pathfinder.

Crowded #2 (Image Comics) – The series about a world driven by apps and jobs driven by them, including one that allows you to buy assassinations, is great so far. That ending of the first issue had us even more excited for what’s next.

Fantastic Four #2 (Marvel) – The first issue was amazing and a fantastic return for Marvel’s first family. We want to know more about where everyone’s been over these years.

House of Whispers #1 (Vertigo/DC Comics) – The Sandman universe is back and we’re intrigued to check out this second series to spin out of it.

Iceman #1 (Marvel) – The first volume was great and writer Sina Grace will hopefully recapture the magic of it.

Infinity Wars #3 (Marvel) – Folks don’t seem to like events but they keep buying them. This event has beaten our expectations and so much better than any of the lead up.

Journey Into Mystery: Birth of Krakoa #1 (Marvel) – We’re hoping for a throwback to the weird sci-fi comics of the past.

Low Road West #1 (BOOM! Studios) – A nuclear strike has left the East Coast uninhabitable and five teens are sent west away from the wreckage that was their home. They’re stuff in the Oklahoma Dust Bowl and are fighting to survive. The concept sounds fantastic and we’re completely sold on it.

Marvel Rising Omega #1 (Marvel) – DC’s Superhero Girls has been a fantastic line and we’ll see if Marvel can pull off that magic with their own characters.

Mech Cadet Yu #12 (BOOM! Studios) – The series wraps up and has been amazing every step of the way. We want more!

MCMLXXV #1 (Image Comics) – Meet Pamela Evans. Much more than a typical Manhattan cab driver, she also happens to be a badass monster-fighter who wields an enchanted tire iron. Well ok then!

Moth & Whisper #1 (Vault Comics) – The city’s best theives has disappeared and been replaced by their daughter?! The concept sounds very interesting and definitely unique!

Mystery Science Theater 3000 #1 (Dark Horse Comics) – The classic television comes to comics. Will it translate? We’ll find out!

The Nameless City Vol. 3 Divided Earth (First Second) – An excellent all-ages graphic novel series that mixes fantasy with martial arts.

Newbury & Hobbes #1 (Titan Comics) – The mystery novels come to comics.

Poser #1 (Waxwork Comics) – A horror slasher story with a music twist and it has an original soundtrack? Yeah, we’re sold on this one.

Ruinworld #3 (BOOM! Studios) – The first two issues of this all-ages fantasy series has been fantastic so we’re excited to read more of this webcomic turned physical comic.

Welcome to Wanderland #1 (BOOM! Studios) – A new twist on fairytales and the coming of age story.

The Wrong Earth #1 (AHOY Comics) – The kick-off series to the new comic publisher, this sendup of superhero comics has us excited. AHOY has promised more to their comics and this is our first chance to see what that’s all about.

WWE NXT Takeover – Proving Ground #1 (BOOM! Studios) – Wresting fan? Then this is a must!

Around the Tubes

The weekend is almost here and we’ll be spending it swinging around as Spider-Man in the brand new video game out today! Who’s picking it up? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for the work day to end and weekend begin, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web.

The Beat – STATEMENT: The Valkyries Disbands Citing Failure to Serve its Community – Wow. Just… wow.

The College Fix – School’s ‘Civility Week’ will feature ‘diversity’ comic convention – This sounds kind of cool.

ICv2 – DC Parent Adopts New Diversity and Inclusion Policy – Good.

The Comics Journal – “It’s Going to Be 600 Pages Long”: An Interview with Jason Lutes – Expect this comic to win awards this year.

Entertainment Weekly – Steve Aoki to pen futuristic comic book series Neon Future: First look – This sounds interesting…

Leafly – The White House and Spider-Man’s Anti-Weed Comic, Fastlane – This sounds amazingly bad.

Kotaku – Spider-Man’s J. Jonah Jameson finds his true calling as a blustering right-wing podcaster – This sounds entertaining.

 

Reviews

Comics Bulletin – Batman #54

ICv2 – The Beatles Yellow Submarine

Comic Attack – Crowded #1

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are you all excited for? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s some comic news and reviews from around the web in our morning roundup.

CBLDF – 66 Pounds of Hentai Confiscated by Swiss Customs – Wow, that’s a lot of Hentai.

CBR – Doom Patrol Casts The Mummy’s Brendan Fraser in Lead Role – This is some good casting.

IGN – Marvel Needs to Give Spider-Man Miles Morales a New Home – We’re expecting something in December.

The Comics Journal – Rape, Sexual Harassment Allegations Prompt Defamation Suit from Small-Press Comics Publisher Cody Pickrodt – Well that’s one way to get the word out about allegations, a lawsuit for folks to cover.

 

Reviews

Comic Attack – Coda #4

Newsarama – Cold Spots #1

Talking Comics – Crowded #1

The Beat – Coyote Doggirl

Talking Comics – Gideon Galls #6

Review: Crowded #1

Ten minutes in the future, the world runs on an economy of job shares and apps, including Reapr: a crowdfunding platform to fund assassinations. Charlie Ellison leads a quiet, normal life until she’s suddenly targeted by a million-dollar Reapr campaign. Hunted by all of Los Angeles, Charlie hires Vita, the lowest-rated bodyguard on the Dfend app. As the campaign picks up speed, they’ll have to figure out who wants Charlie dead before the campaign’s 30 days-or their lives-are over.

Fun with a pop sense of style, that’s my general thought about Crowded #1 that feels like a spoof of both the action genre and the Uber-economy. Taking place in the future, Charlie is forced to have numerous jobs scraping together a living through a few hustles. She babysits, drives a car, rents her card, walks dogs, all through apps that enable her to hop from one thing to another. It’s the on-demand economy that’s front and center in the story written by Christopher Sebela.

Crowded feels like a brilliant commentary about today’s society and with Charlie being targeted for assassination, it also feels like it’s a statement how the Uber-economy needs to die. Sebela and team feel like they’ve put together a story that’s a subtle jab at the subject reminding me of classics like Robocop and Starship Troopers with satire and commentary throughout that needs, and deserves to be, explored. There’s of course something by issue’s end that may shake up that initial take but that seems like it’ll be part of the fun of this series.

Ro Stein provides the art along with color by Triona Farrell, ink by Ted Brandt, and lettering from Cardinal Rae. The style is one that has an Aeon Flux sense about it all mixed with bright colors that creates a pop feel to what is a gritty action story. It’s John Wick with lots of yellows and pinks, full of action and awesome to look at.

The first issue is a winner delivering humor and a flow visually and through the narrative that sucks in the reader and makes you want more. There’s a pacing that takes you through it all and gets you to the other end waiting for more action and wanting more humor as we explore this world and characters. And, with the shiny action outside, there’s an interior depth that begs to explored and debated.

Story: Christopher Sebela Art: Ro Stein
Color: Triona Farrel Ink: Ted Brandt Lettering: Cardinal Rae
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for reviews

Graphic Policy’s Top Comic Picks this Week!

Wednesdays are new comic book day! Each week hundreds of comics are released, and that can be pretty daunting to go over and choose what to buy. That’s where we come in!

Each week our contributors choose what they can’t wait to read this week or just sounds interesting. In other words, this is what we’re looking forward to and think you should be taking a look at!

Find out what folks think below, and what comics you should be looking out for this Wednesday.

Archie Meets Batman ’66 #2 (Archie Comics) – The two worlds collide in a fun adventure that really works in the first issue. We didn’t get a lot of Batman/Archie action but it looks like this issue will get us there.

Batman #53 (DC Comics) – This storyline has focused on Bruce Wayne on a jury to decide if Mr. Freeze is guilty after Batman pins him to a murder.

Crowded #1 (Image Comics) – In the future, it runs on an economy of job shares and apps and someone has targeted an individual who then hires the lowest-rated bodyguard to protect her.

Edge of Spider-Geddon #1 (Marvel) – Spider-Verse round 2 is what this sounds like as the multiverse’s Spider-people come together once again.

Extermination #1 (Marvel) – Marvel’s big X event that has something to do with the original X-Men… we’re intrigued and hoping this is a return to the great events of the past.

Fence #9 (BOOM! Studios) – A comic about fencing!? Add in a little drama and this comic has quickly become one of our favorites. This is a great example of looking at what others are doing, in this case manga sports comics, and bringing it to Western audiences. Fantastic all around.

Hellicious #2 (Starburn Industries Press) – The first issue of this series was hillarious in a nice twisted way. Short take: little girl who’s a demon and likes to torture things. As we said, twisted.

Infinity Wars #2 (Marvel) – The lead up series left us wanting but the first issue of Marvel’s summer event really caught us off guard in a good way. We’re excited to see what happens next and honestly, we have no idea where this one is going.

Injustice vs. the Masters of the Universe #2 (DC Comics) – We expected a fun first issue but not one with so much depth and thought. Will the second issue be a repeat and continue to surprise? We’ll find out!

Pearl #1 (DC Comics/Jinxworld) – Brian Michael Bendis’ Jinxworld comics are now being published by DC and this new series he’s back with long time collaborator Michael Gaydos. We’re beyond excited.

Ruinworld #2 (BOOM! Studios) – The first issue was adorable, fun, and funny, and we’re excited to read this second issue of this webcomic that has come to print!

Tongues #1 (Fantagraphics) – Anders Nilsen series taking place in the modern Middles East following the entwined stories of an imprisoned god, the eagle that is his jailor, an east African orphan on an errand of murder and a young American with a teddy bear on his back, lost in a trackless wilderness. Revenge, evolution, the fate of the world… and a talking chicken.

Terminator: Sector War #1 (Dark Horse Comics) – It’s been a while since we’ve had a new Terminator series and with a new film in production, we’re excited for what’s to come!
Undocumented (Abrams Comicarts) – The story of immigrant workers who come to the United States without papers. A timely graphic novel we’re excited to see humanize this reality.

Volition #1 (Aftershock Comics) – It’s the not too distant future where a race of robots has spawned but are second class citizens. They struggle for equal rights but a virus threatens all artifical life.

Rebel Wilson Snags Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein, and Ted Brandt’s Crowded

Crowded is the latest comic to be optioned for a possible movie. The comic written by Christopher Sebela and drawn by Ro Stein and Ted Brandt, and published by Image Comics was optioned by Rebel Wilson.

In the near future the world’s economy is all job sharing and apps where a crowdfunding platform that funds assassinations named Reapr is all the rage. The story follows a woman named Charlie who becomes a target on Reapr with a multimillion-dollar bounty. Charlie then hires the lowest-rated bodyguard on an app called Dfend. The two must work together to take down the assassins before the 30-day period concludes or their lives are over.

Sebela will be a consulting producer and a search for a writer to adapt the comic has begun.

Crowded—A Pulse-Pounding New Thriller for fans of Black Mirror

Eisner-nominated writer Christopher Sebela, Ro Stein & Ted Brandt, Triona Farrell, and Cardinal Rae team up for the forthcoming thriller, Crowded, set to launch from Image Comics this August.

Ten minutes in the future, the world runs on an economy of job shares and apps, including Reapr: a crowdfunding platform to fund assassinations. Charlie Ellison leads a quiet, normal life until she’s suddenly targeted by a million-dollar Reapr campaign. Hunted by all of Los Angeles, Charlie hires Vita, the lowest-rated bodyguard on the Dfend app. As the campaign picks up speed, they’ll have to figure out who wants Charlie dead before the campaign’s 30 days—or their lives—are over.

Crowded explores the seedy underbelly of today’s technology with the knowing implications of a Black Mirror episode and will have readers on the edge of their seat.

Crowded #1 Cover A by Stein & Brandt (Diamond Code JUN180046) and Crowded #1 Cover B by Rachael Stott (Diamond Code JUN180047) hit stores on Wednesday, August 15th. The final order cutoff deadline for comics retailers is Monday, July 23rd.

Around the Tubes

It’s new comic book day! What’s everyone getting? What are you looking forward to? What are you reading first? Sound off in the comments below! While you wait for shops to open, here’s a bunch of news and reviews from around the web.

Metal Injection – Norway’s Bloody Black Metal History Is Being Turned Into A Comic Series – Nice! We’re sure there’ll be lots of forests for them to get lost in.

ICv2 – Pepe the Frog Creator Sues InfoWars – Good!

 

Reviews

The Beat – Compulsive Comics

Newsarama – Crowded #1

Newsarama – Doctor Star and the Kingdom of Lost Tomorrows #1

Newsarama – Dodge City #1

Nothing But Comics – Firebug

Newsarama – Gideon Falls #1

Newsarama – Green Hornet #1

Newsarama – Oblivion Song #1

Talking Comics – Relic Dragon #1

Comic Attack – The Terrifics #1

Talking Comics – The Wilds #1

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