Tag Archives: clayton cowles

Review: Winter Soldier #1

He’s been so many things but now Bucky, aka the Winter Soldier, has found redemption and he’s helping others find it too. Writer Kyle Higgins, artist Rod Reis, and letterer Clayton Cowles kick off a whole new direction and adventure for the Winter Soldier.

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Daredevil #612

The whirlwind adventure of the fall ends here, in an oversized and overwhelming Daredevil epic as only Charles Soule and Phil Noto could deliver it.

Five years and forty issues, Charles Soule’s run on Daredevil ends with the death of Daredevil. Injured, dealing with his fake brother come to life, and the mysterious Vigil, Matt/Daredevil is still on a mission to take down Wilson Fisk. Soule delivers a story that’s a rollercoaster of a ride that has you feeling victorious… until you don’t.

It’s difficult to fully review the issue without spoiling it but Soule presents a comic that’s interesting in that it feels quick and in a way choppy to start. It’s dreamlike floating along taking you through the attempt to take down the Kingpin in a Sorkian sort of way, in the court of law. It’s a moment made for tv and then you find out what’s really happening. And it all makes sense. And then reality hits. It all becomes clear as to why Soule has written a comic the way he has and presented moments the way he has. And there’s clearly a brilliance to it all.

It’s all helped by Phil Noto on art and Clayton Cowles on lettering. The art is beautiful and it just adds to what Soule has put together, a perfect combination of story and art. Again, it’s difficult to say why without spoiling things but, it just works perfectly.

Soule closes a chapter in the life of Matt Murdock and we’ll have to wait a few months to see what’s next but this is a beautiful comic that feels like a fitting tribute to Daredevil and personal in a way too. The team is given us a hell of a chapter that’s hard to not choke up a little as the final pages are read. “Death” of heroes seems to happen every week in comics, and never permanent, but when the story is this good, who really cares.

Story: Charles Soule Art: Phil Noto
Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Heroes in Crisis #3

Tragedies deepen as more secrets behind the “superhero hospital” called Sanctuary are revealed! What compelled Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman to create it in the first place? How was it built? And if the hospital truly is alive via A.I., who – or what – is the brain of “Sanctuary?”

What is Sanctuary? We know this is the location heroes can go if they need help to deal with the issues they experience. It’s a hospital of sorts but up to this point, we don’t know much about it. This issue changes that as we learn how it all works and the more we learn, the more heartbreaking the series is.

Writer Tom King has delivered an issue that’s hard to not reflect upon and come out the other end rather depressed. Through various patients of the facility, we learn how Sanctuary works. We also learn those individuals’ pain. Why was Wally West there? What about Lagoon Boy? How about Booster Gold? King dives into them in various ways and reveals how much they hurt, each in their own way. And, that makes their deaths even more tragic and sad.

King reveals more regarding that as well as who the killer might be. But, the issue also throws up some flags that all might not be what it seems. I left it pondering if there’s not more going on and there still isn’t a rabbit hole for us readers to go through.

The art by Clay Mann and Lee Weeks with color by Tomeu Morey and lettering by Clayton Cowles is as fantastic as expected. It’s top notch work that has you focusing in on the details to enhance the emotional ride. The look on a character’s face or their body language says as much about what’s going on or how they feel as the words that King puts on the page.

This is a hell of a downer of an issue but it makes the story so far even more tragic. We’ve gone past the shock of it all to the point of realization of what has happened and who it has happened to. The team presents heroes not cut down in battle protecting the world but individuals murdered at their most vulnerable.

Story: Tom King Art: Clay Mann, Lee Weeks
Color: Tomeu Morey Lettering: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.5 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.5 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Ironheart #1

RiRi Williams takes off in her own solo series with a new suit of armor, a new lab, and a new lease on life. Ironheart steps out of the shadow of Tony Stark to forge her own future in this brand new series!

Ironheart #1 is by Eve Ewing, Kevin Libranda, Luciano Vecchio, Geoffo, Matt Milla, and Clayton Cowles.

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 28! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Black Order #1

The breakout characters from Avengers: Infinity War are getting their own limited series picking up from Avengers: No Surrender.

Written by Derek Landy, with art by Phillip Tan, ink by Marc Deering, Guillermo Ortega, Le Beau Underwood, color by Jay David Ramos, and lettering by VC’ Clayton Cowles, the villains take the spotlight!

Get your copy in comic shops Wednesday November 14. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Domino Vol. 1 Killer Instinct

Domino takes center stage in an ongoing series written by Gail Simone with art by David Baleon, Michael Shelfer, and Anthony Piper, color by Jesus Aburtov, and lettering by VC’s Clayton Cowles. The trade collects the first six issues of the series.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores on November 20. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: The Death of the Inhumans #5

The Royal Family has been broken. Now, something new and terrible rises from its ashes. Who is Vox? Where are the Inhumans he’s killed? And what lies ahead for a king without a kingdom?

When I first heard about this event, I have to admit, the title and what it promised had me worried as a “stunt event.” The downplaying of how big it would be and the fact writer Donny Cates was in charge had me intrigued that something “was up.” And with the conclusion in The Death of the Inhumans #5, we’ve gotten an “event” comic that is tragically under the radar.

This final chapter goes by the title “Rome” and by the time it wraps, it’s clear why that title was chosen. With the dark reality of what and who Vox is, Black Bolt must face his destiny to bring down the Kree and save his people.

The final chapter is solid on the action and high on the drama but rather lacking in some key aspects, an issue that hampers the overall package. While we have a better idea of what/who Vox is, the how isn’t explained too well. It ends up being a slasher/horror movie boogeyman more than anything. An unstoppable force that we just accept. Black Bolt also goes on about destroying the Kree and while damage is done, we’re never quite given the moment of the enemy’s defeat. Another issue, or an increased page count, would have benefited this issue and the series as a whole.

Despite that, this is a pretty solid ending putting Black Bolt squarely back into the warrior king role having to make a difficult decision to keep his people safe. It also sets up a very unknown future for the Inhumans.

The art by Ariel Olivetti with color by Jordie Bellaire and lettering by Clayton Cowles is ok and feels a little different than the previous four issues. Something doesn’t feel quite as polished. I’ve hadd issues with Olivertti’s art in the past but here it has mainly been good. This issue though it’s a miss unfortunately. Action sequences that should have oomph to it don’t and emotional scenes lack it for the art. The detail too is a bit different. If you had asked me, I’d have been convinced the issue had a different artist than the previous four.

The issue is a tragic one and Cates sets the classic characters off in to a new direction and new era. What’s next, who knows? But, for what I was expecting to be an eye rolling event, this is an entertaining story and one that ends on a pretty high note. The title might be a bit over the top but the story within really brings things together and gets the characters back to their roots. Here’s hoping Cates is given a chance to steer these characters into the future for some time.

Story: Donny Cates Art: Ariel Olivetti
Color: Jordie Bellaire Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.25 Art: 7.65 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Weapon H Vol. 1 AWOL

The Weapon X Program has a new creation. Take a little bit of Wolverine, some Hulk, and a few other things, and you’ve got Weapon H! Yes, the concept is out there but the first trade, collecting the first six issues, is fun!

Weapon H Vol. 1 AWOL is by Greg Pak, Cory Smith, Marcus To, Aro Anindito, Terry Pallot, Keith Champaign, Scott Hanna, Walden Wong, Roberto Poggi, Morry Hollowell, Rachelle Rosenberg, Chris Sotomayor, Joe Caramagna, and Clayton Cowles.

Get your copy in comic shops today and book stores November 13. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

 

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Heroes in Crisis #2

Suspected of murder, [REDACTED] and [REDACTED] find themselves on the run from the super-hospital called Sanctuary -with each thinking the other one is the real killer! It’s up to Batman to solve this heinous crime, but suspicion falls on him when Superman and Wonder Woman ponder just how much Sanctuary’s A.I. is telling them. Meanwhile, [REDACTED] tries to make a shady deal to hide from the Trinity, while [REDACTED] searches out an old friend to help him out of this mess-and only gets deeper in trouble.

That’s a whole lot of “redacted” in that description and going into this comic with as little information as possible is helpful. Heroes in Crisis #2 not only deals with the fallout of the murder of an unknown amount of individuals, but also peels back more about Sanctuary and those that have visited it.

Writer Tom King balances a lot in this issue with a few tracks along the way. Harley is on the run both wanting to get caught and not at the same time. Her actions as presented make her a prime suspect as to the massacre at Sanctuary. The trio of Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman are on the hunt for her and it’s not the eventual confrontation that is the key moment, it’s what it reveals. King intelligently adds a wrinkle to the situation with that reveal, one that will make relationships rocky going forward.

But what of our other suspect? Booster is on the run as well deciding what to do and his decision is simple, try to find the killer. That also might mean him. Unfortunately, he’s kind of rambling and while we can say it’s the trauma of the situation, he’s not off the hook. His intentions make it seem like he might be but again King gives us just enough to leave him as a suspect. It also expands the story bringing in another hero impacted by the events.

While all of that would be more than enough to enjoy, King uses confessionals to dive deeper into our heroes. Batman, Wonder Woman, and Superman, are all explored showing each have deep trauma. No matter how much we think of them as together, they’re not. They have flaws and while brief, it’ll make you think of each of them and how their confessions add to their characters.

There’s also revelations of more murdered individuals, with one being a shocker. That leads to the most touching moment as one character mourns their loss. What’s said is sweet and beautiful in a way and gives us an emotional punch beyond the shock and anger we’ve seen.

Artists Clay Mann and Travis Moore, along with colorists Tomeu Morey and Arif Prianto, and letterer Clayton Cowles deliver a beautiful comic. It looks great on every level and a high profile comic like this deserves art like this. The characters are solid with much of the emotion delivered through their facial expressions. Teasing just enough for us to get the situation and where they’re at. There’s also solid transitions between scenes as the comic might go from a fight to a quieter moment in a page. And the art helps deliver those highs and lows of emotion from a high octane fight to mourning. What details are focused on add to the narrative.

The first issue was solid and second continues the pattern. This is an event you’ll likely either love or hate and I’m enjoying it as it explores layers we rarely see discussed when it comes to superheroes and all of that is wrapped up in a nice murder mystery.

Story: Tom King Art: Clay Mann, Travis Moore
Color: Tomeu Morey, Arif Prianto Lettering: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.15 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.2 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Spider-Gwen: Ghost-Spider #1

It’s a whole new spin on Gwen and her world of Earth-65!  We pick up with Gwen right where we left her – fighting crime through her home reality, unaware that it sits on the precipice of interdimensional calamity! Someone’s gonna be late to band practice…

Spider-Gwen: Ghost Spider #1 picks up where the previous volume of Spider-Gwen left off and Spider-Geddon has lead to. Gwen has done her time and is figuring out the hole superheroics thing still when she’s recruited by Spider-Ham to take on the Inheritors again.

If you haven’t read Spider-Geddon #1 and especially this week’s #2, you’re going to want to do that. This issue dives right into what was revealed in that second issue.

Warning, there be spoilers ahead!!!

Ready?

Last warning!

In Spider-Geddon #2 at first it looked like Spider-Gwen had died but we know she was sent off to another Earth in another part of the multiverse. Which Earth? We still don’t quite know as we get to explore this new world as our heroine does as well.

And that exploration is part of what Seanan McGuire has set up as part of the fun of this first issue. We get to work through the logic and what steps to take as Gwen does exactly that. Who should she seek out for help? Who’s good and who’s evil? We meet one potential villain at least but when it comes to the multiverse, you never quite know.

Artist Rosi Kämpe along with colorist Ian Herring and letterer Clayton Cowles deliver worlds that feel a bit more like the upcoming dayglow of Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse in theaters this December. It’s an interesting style and while there’s points where I might have taken advantage of perspectives more, it’s an artistically good issue that’s entertaining to look at. There’s some issues with Gwen’s body herself that doesn’t quite look right when it comes to the human form but it never hurts the enjoyment.

The issue is a good one serving as a direct tie-in to Spider-Geddon and continuing the interesting events from there. A new world to explore always has me interested in seeing what’s going to be done differently and that has me wanting to come back for more and see what’s next.

Story: Seanan McGuire Art: Rosi Kämpe
Color: Ian Herring Letterer: VC’s Clayton Cowles
Story: 7.5 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.35 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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