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Review: Doctor Strange: Fall Sunrise #1

Doctor Strange: Fall Sunrise #1

Doctor Strange awakens alone in a distant world not his own. Lost of purpose and surrounded by danger, the wandering sorcerer must explore this land of blades and mystery to unravel arcane secrets and escape the deadly horrors that lie in wait! Tradd Moore introduces to a strange new world in Doctor Strange: Fall Sunrise #1, a debut issue that highlights Moore’s artistic talents.

It’s hard to describe Tradd Moore’s art style. I originally discovered his talent with the Luthor Strode series from Image and from there it was All-New Ghost Rider and Silver Surfer: Black. Moore’s style is unique and stands out with a pop sense about it that is hard to find in the current comic market. Moore mixes classic Jack Kirby with black light tripiness for a visual treat.

Doctor Strange: Fall Sunrise #1 is a fine example of where Moore’s strengths lie. Strange has awakened in a strange land unsure of where he is and what he’s to do. Like diving into an open world video game, he wanders attempting to put the pieces of the puzzle together. What’s going? Honestly, I can’t say beyond a magical world that feels like I should be dropping acid in. Weird ghost like creatures, more down to earth animals, and a likely enemy that’s ominous and mysterious all are introduced.

The story itself is an interesting one with a dreamlike style. There’s a poetic flow to it at times reminding me of Poe during moments that feel like madness sinking in.

Moore’s art is the highlight here with visuals that will have you lingering on the page long after you have finished the words. It’s a beautiful and beyond unique look that stands out from the rest of the comics on the shelves. If you’re a fan of pop art, beautiful comic art, or what makes comics unique, this is one to definitely check out.

Story: Tradd Moore Art: Tradd Moore
Color: Heather Moore Letterer: Clayton Cowles, Tradd Moore
Story: 7.0 Art: 9.5 Overall: 7.5 Recommendation: Read

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Review: Star Trek #1

Star Trek #1

The Doctor Who franchise is one that definitely thrives on nostalgia. Each incarnation has brought a whole new actor and different take on the role. As we sit on the precipice of another new doctor inhabiting the role, the newest special took this into account delivering twists and increasing anticipation. We catch Jodie Whittaker on what may be her last appearance in the role and see some past incarnations show up to give her guidance.

This was not the first time that has happened on the show, and it gives longtime viewers the fan service they crave. I wish more shows would capitalize on it, as many fans would appreciate it. One such franchise that plays with this is Star Trek. Over the years, the classic show has embraced more crossovers. In Star Trek #1, we find Sisko as he looks to find out who is killing the gods with the help from crew members from some very familiar Star Trek franchises.

Star Trek #1 begins by taking to us to a very familiar, location, Deep Space Nine. After years among his travels with the gods, Bejanmin Sisko has returned reuniting with his son and the rest of his former crew. The reunion is short as Sisko has a mission he’s been sent back for. Unfortunately, it’s a mission he’s not quite sure about. After seeking out the help from Picard, Sisko puts his crew together. It’s a crew of familiar characters from throughout Star Trek’s history including Data as his First Officer, and Scottie who is how in command of his own ship, the Theseus. The issue delivers an interesting mix of characters from throughout Trek history and a mystery that dives into the franchise’s as well.

Overall, Star Trek #1 is a fun debut issue that will make fans miss Deep Space Nine. The story by Kelly and Lanzing is awesome. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, it’s an excellent team up story that fans will enjoy in the nuances.

Story: Collin Kelly, Jackson Lanzing Art: Ramon Rosanas
Color: Lee Loughridge Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

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Review: Alien #1

Alien #1

Overall, the Alien/Predator franchise is one of my favorites. I haven’t read every comic or book but I generally enjoy diving into the world. Like the xenomorph themselves, the stories can take on so many different genres, from sci-fi to horror to straight up action to even westerns. Alien #1 kicks off a new chapter this time focusing on synths, something that feels rather fresh and new to me.

Written by Phillip Kennedy Johnson, Alien #1 delivers a basic premise that seems to be a running theme in the franchise, don’t trust corporations. Opening up with a disaster, the story eventually shifts to a group of synths who are being called into action. They’re needed for a dangerous mission where radiation and xenomorphs would kill anyone else. Should they take up the mission, synths would be granted citizenship if they choose. Now, do you trust the offer? The answer is obviously no if you’re familiar with the world but as usual, the smart decision wouldn’t make for an interesting read.

Alien #1 is interesting in that it’s giving us something a little different. As I said in the start, I haven’t read everything but beyond the films, synths aren’t something I remember reading a lot about. It’s a rather big unknown to me as a reader and that makes the series all the more exciting. Instead of expendable humans, we get beings who should give the xenomorphs a run for their money. Add on top that they should throw off their usual cycle of death and reproduction, it could come together for a familiar but new take.

The art by Julius Ohta is solid. With color by Yen Nitro and lettering by Clayton Cowles, the comic delivers a mix of horror and some superheroics. That latter aspect isn’t something I thought I’d see in the franchise but due to the abilities of the synth, there’s moves that are more superhero than soldier. Throw on some spandex or a cape and the movement and visuals are there. It’ll be interesting to see if the series as a whole moves into that genre a bit with this latest story arc.

Alien #1 is an intriguing start. It focuses on an aspect of the world that often feels like a story shoved to the side and dips its toes into a genre I haven’t see the world play in before. There’s a lot here that long time fans and new readers in what could be something really new for the franchise.

Story: Phillip Kennedy Johnson Art: Julius Ohta
Color: Yen Nitro Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.0 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Amazing Fantasy #1000

Amazing Fantasy #1000

(W) Kurt Busiek, Various (A) Jim Cheung, Various (CA) John Romita Jr.
RATED T
In Shops: Aug 31, 2022
SRP: $7.99

The comic that brought you SPIDER-MAN hits issue #1000! We’re going big to celebrate in this, our thousandth issue of AMAZING FANTASY! An ALL-STAR roster of creators – Anthony Falcone, Dan Slott, Ho Che Anderson, Jonathan Hickman, Kurt Busiek, Michael Cho, Neil Gaiman, Rainbow Rowell, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Jim Cheung, Marco Checchetto, Olivier Coipel, Ryan Stegman, Steve McNiven, Terry Dodson, Todd Nauck, and more – are coming together to celebrate Peter Parker and Spider-Man’s birthdays!

Amazing Fantasy #1000

Review: Damage Control #1

Damage Control #1

Civilians in a superhero world seems to always be a a good opportunity for comic relief. In just about every season of The Boys, they have been our eyes into that world and how damage done by super powered beings can be detrimental. They did it in such a way that it becomes tangible to the viewer. It was not all done in a serious way , there were some comic points throughout.

Then there was the short-lived Vanessa Hudgens sitcom, Powerless, which showed flashes of brilliance. It was about an insurance company set in DC’s world of superheroes. It is important for these type of stories to remind us that these heroes are there for a reason. In Damage Control #1, we get a peek behind the scenes of Marvel’s own “cleanup crew”, as they take care of incidents throughout the world in two exciting stories.

 In “Into The Mailstrom”, We meet Gus, a fresh newcomer on his first day at work, where his boss gives him a rundown of what to expect,  but as soon as they enter their headquarters, nothing could prepare him for what he sees.  As he gets first big task, which is to deliver mail including an ice cream, while having hilarious encounters with Nick Fury and Ghost Rider, before being helped by Nightcrawler to deliver the mail to everyone before 5:00p.m. with the exception of one, this is where Quicksilver helps him out, and saves the day.  In “Zapped and the Mother Dimension” , we meet Bart, an intern, whose mother just came by to visit him, embarrassing him at every turn including revealing his crush. By issue’s end,  Bart’s Mom gets into an interdimensional fight with Thanos when she gets a hold of the reality stone, but defeats him and sends him back to his dimension.

Overall, Damage Control #1 is a funny set of stories which offer some irreverence in an often unforgiving world surrounded by supes. The story by the different creators is hilarious. The art by the different creators is gorgeous. Altogether, readers will be happy to go back to the Flatiron to enter the zany world of Damage Control.

Story: Adam F. Goldberg, Hans Podionoff, Charlotte Fullerton McDuffie Art: Will Robson, Jay Fosgitt
Color: Ruth Redmond Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 10 Art: 9.6 Overall: 9.7 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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Preview: Amazing Fantasy #1000

Amazing Fantasy #1000

(W) Kurt Busiek, Various (A) Jim Cheung, Various (CA) John Romita Jr.
RATED T
In Shops: Aug 31, 2022
SRP: $7.99

The comic that brought you SPIDER-MAN hits issue #1000! We’re going big to celebrate in this, our thousandth issue of AMAZING FANTASY! An ALL-STAR roster of creators – Anthony Falcone, Dan Slott, Ho Che Anderson, Jonathan Hickman, Kurt Busiek, Michael Cho, Neil Gaiman, Rainbow Rowell, Giuseppe Camuncoli, Jim Cheung, Marco Checchetto, Olivier Coipel, Ryan Stegman, Steve McNiven, Terry Dodson, Todd Nauck, and more – are coming together to celebrate Peter Parker and Spider-Man’s birthdays!

Amazing Fantasy #1000

Review: Batman: One Bad Day – Riddler

Batman: One Bad Day - Riddler

Riddle me this. When is a Riddler story more than a riddle? When writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads are involved. Batman: One Bad Day – Riddler kicks off a series of one-shots focused on Batman’s villains and it’s one hell of a start. By the end, not only do we get a better sense of the character’s motivations but also a whole new outlook.

Written by King, Batman: One Bad Day – Riddler is an interesting comic that starts off with a murder. In the wide open, the Riddler has killed a man. No riddle. No apparent motivation. Why has he done this? Why does he want to speak to Batman so badly?

The comic bounces back and forth between the Riddler’s current crime and his youth. We get a little of his motivation as to why he is the way he is. It creates some understanding and some sympathy but also a coldness. There’s a strange lull after reading the comic as you think about the Riddler’s life. There’s a disconnect in some ways. And that makes it all the more scarier. Add in the character’s new outlook at things and it becomes all the more uneasy. Where King takes the character is hopefully a direction other writers pick up on as it takes him from a character with a rather tired and played out schtick and turns him into a psychotic stone cold killer. It’s no longer about the riddles and more about how intelligent he is and how he uses that.

Mitch Gerads is once again in-sync with King. The art is fantastic with a a look that’s a little off. The character, the coloring, it all feels sickly in some ways, a scary nightmare of the Riddler’s we’re witnessing. The comic jumps back and forth in time using the colors to easily indicate when we are but there’s a brilliance to the transitions as it slides between the two visually and thematically. In the modern times the world is a sickly green, playing off the character’s iconic look but adding a drab aspect. It too signifies the radical change in the character.

Batman: One Bad Day – Riddler is a hell of a start to this series of one-shots. It delivers a rather unnerving tale as the Riddler unravels and builds himself back up. It’s a new status-quo that hopefully becomes the Riddler we know going forward creating an even more frightening foe for Batman to tangle with. On it’s own, it’s one hell of a read that’ll stick with you.

Story: Tom King Art: Mitch Gerads Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.75 Art: 8.75 Overall: 8.75 Recommendation: Buy

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Review: Predator #1

Predator #1

The thing about suffering injustice is that it doesn’t just leave you like a bad day or when things don’t go your way. It’s when you know that you’ve been wronged that your brain and your soul cant compute. Part of you feels like you were cheated and violated.

The cold hard fact is that you were wronged. The perpetrator of the act remains in your crosshairs with you hoping they get their just due. It doesn’t matter how it happens, what matters is that justice is carried out. In Predator #1, one woman looks to deliver that against the same monster that killed her family as a child.

We;re taken to an unknown planet in the far reaches of space in the year 2056, where we find two Predators in a heated battle,  but nothing is what it seems, as the victor emerges, and is revealed to be human woman, once they take off their helmet. We flashback to the year 2041 on the planet, Damara, where we meet Theta, whose family is there on a research mission. But things go sideways, as they are interrupted by a predator, who decimated her family. We find her years later, the captain of her own ship with one single minded purpose, to find the creature responsible for her parents’ death, as she traverses the galaxy looking for the one responsible, while taking apart any Predator she encounters.  The reader soon finds out that she has  been collecting intelligence on the Predators, studying their moves, the places they have been and where they come from. By Issue’s end, Theta crash lands on a winter planet, as her ship suffers a system failure, leaving her chances for survival to be slim.

Overall, Predator #1 is an action packed debut that shows a taste for revenge has its costs. The story by Brisson is brilliant. The art by the creative team is beautiful. Altogether, a story that is a fine addition to the Predator canon.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Kev Walker
Color: Frank D’Armata Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Read

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Review: Predator #1

Predator #1

While the franchise has been up and down, the worlds of Alien and Predator is one of my favorites. Each does such a great job of taking various genres and giving them a slight twist. Horror, sci-fi, action, they do them all, and often have a bit of a message underneath. Predator #1 kicks off a new chapter set in the year 2056 and changes up the genre enough to stand out.

Written by Ed Brisson, Predator #1 follows Theta, a woman set on revenge. When she was younger, her parents and the crew they were with, were hunted and killed by a Predator. Now, for fifteen years she’s hunted Predators in hopes of finding the one that killed her parents. Having stolen a ship, she’s now wanted by many and of course the Predators would be happy to see her dead.

It’s an interesting twist on the familiar formula. Instead of an individual or team being hunted, instead our protagonist is the hunter. The motivations are simple, but there’s something here that makes the comic interesting and entertaining. It doesn’t completely excite but there’s more than enough for fans of the world. We get some interesting insights into Predators with a character that is entertaining enough. Brisson also knows this is just the introduction and setup with the real show to come starting the next issue.

Kev Walker‘s art is solid. The world feels alien but familiar and Theta’s armor is a nice take on the Predator look. With color by Frank D’Armata and lettering by Clayton Cowles, the comic captures the look of the world without if feeling too dark or grimy. There’s a nice subtle aspect to the visuals, especially Theta’s ship which both looks functioning and slightly off. It feels like it’s going to break down any minute but you just don’t know when. Theta too looks like an individual who has lost the sense of fun. She’s on the hunt and looks it with everything else being a distraction. She’s constantly pissed off in her look as she should be.

Predator #1 is a good start to the series. It doesn’t quite blow things away but it’s a good setup that introduces our protagonist and the mission. It also doesn’t drag things out too much getting to the point. Fans of the property should be happy with the start and where the comic ends, the second issue is where things should be getting really interesting.

Story: Ed Brisson Art: Kev Walker
Color: Frank D’Armata Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 7.75 Art: 7.75 Overall: 7.75 Recommendation: Read

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Review: Love Everlasting #1

Love Everlasting #1

Though you don’t see the genre as much today, there was a time that romance comics ruled the stands. They were a regular release from all the major publishers with a massive reach. In recent years, we mostly get a kitschy return to the genre that lasts a short time period or is a miniseries. Love Everlasting #1 takes us back to that classic genre with an updated and intriguing twist.

Written by Tom King, Love Everlasting #1 introduces Joan, a woman who’s looking for love in our first story and finds it. Unfortunately the love she finds is with George who is dating her roommate. What will she do!? Or, is it Kit, the musician she loves? But will her dad approve? Wait, isn’t she supposed to marry Chad? Why’s she in the old west? King delivers a few shorts as Joan bounces around time looking for love. Or, is she bouncing around time because of love? Is it the same Joan? Is this a multiverse of romance!? Will we find out answers!? Not in this comic. Instead, King delivers a start that feels like a series of shorts before it all comes together. It’s a spin that’s unexpected and adds far more than just a well written romance comic.

The art by Elsa Charretier is great. With color by Matt Hollignsworth and lettering by Clayton Cowles, the comic has a look that both evokes the classic genre but also updates it a bit as well. It’s great to see Joan placed in different time periods with a little change but it’s the same character throughout. Then there’s the various time periods themselves. Each stands out as unique but that all have a style that connects them together. Charretier also nails down a lot of the visual tics that the genre is known for. With Ben Day dots, the comic would have nailed the classic look.

Love Everlasting #1 is an intriguing debut. It both feels like an homage and a slight twist to the romance comic genre. There’s a lot of details that were clearly added to make sure the comic nailed the style but at the same time, it all feels updated and fits modern comics. It’s an intriguing start to the series that has a lot of potential for what’s to come.

Story: Tom King Art: Elsa Charretier
Color: Matt Hollingsworth Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.4 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Buy

Image Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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