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Review: Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot #10

Bloodshot only has “One Last Shot” as the brand-new story arc starts in Bloodshot #10! Artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo join writer Tim Seeley for Bloodshot’s road to retribution. Who can a one-man army trust when everyone’s trying to kill him?

The last issue of Bloodshot wasn’t exactly the strongest in the series. Whereas the series has found its strength in the urgency that comes from Tim Seeley’s writing and the speed in which things happen from moment to moment, the last issue suffered from a general lack of cohesiveness as the story (and the character) jumped from location to location in an interesting use of Bloodshot’s abilities that did come across as well as it could have. Otherwise, though, the series has been a breath of excitement borne from the action movie pace of the comic; when it’s good, it’s very good.

Bloodshot #10 introduces comics fans to characters that we’ve seen in the 2020 movie with Wilfred Wigins making his on page debut, and I can’t help but read his lines Lamorne Morris’ voice – something that Seeley captures really well. Wigans’ adds a level of levity to the comic that has been missing (it’s odd, because levity and humour don’t often go hand in hand with Bloodshot, but with Seeley’s style of story telling, the combination actually works a lot better than I’d have expected after previous Bloodshot runs). It’s not all fun and games, though, as we find Bloodshot locked in a place he’ll need to escape from in order to face a new and familiar threat – without going into specifics, the escape sequence is somewhat disturbing in what it doesn’t show you. There’s also a lot of story here; I had to check a couple of times when reading the comic what page I was on, because I was convinced the comic was an oversized book

Seeley is joined by artists Brett Booth and Pedro Andrea, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. Although Booth’s name comes ahead of Andreo’s in the credits, he’s only actually credited with a handful of pages in the comic. The reason I mention this is because Andreo’s work is really good. The Spaniard adds a visual flair to the book that’s a lot like adding parmesan cheese onto a pasta dish; it just makes an already good meal a touch better. His style also flows from the previous issue, which gives the entire series a sense of visual continuity despite having a plethora of talented artists in its ten-issue run. Andreo bolsters a solid story with his layouts and copious use of blank space amongst the action. The sequential art in this book has some spectacular moments amidst a story that slides between good and pretty good with ease.

Bloodshot #10 is a return to the series previous energy and flow, kicking off another arc that should allow new readers to hop into the series with relative ease. What isn’t captured in the recap you can figure out from exposition in the dialogue. A return to form after last issue, which is always good news for any jumping on point.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo
Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.2 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


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Preview: Bloodshot #10

BLOODSHOT #10

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH, PEDRO ANDREO
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by SIMON BISLEY
Cover B by DAVID NAKAYAMA
Preorder Variant Cover by SHAWN CRYSTAL
On Sale January 13th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

Bloodshot only has “One Last Shot” as the brand-new story arc starts now!

Superstar artist Brett Booth and Pedro Andreo join best-selling scribe Tim Seeley for Bloodshot’s road to retribution.

Who can a one-man army trust when everyone’s trying to kill him?

BLOODSHOT #10

We Talk with Bloodshot Artist Pedro Andreo About Making His Valiant!

Bloodshot #10

Pedro Andreo is a name that most of you are likely unfamiliar with unless you read Bloodshot #8 or Aartha, Chronicles of the No Lands. The talented Spaniard is a new face in the North American comics scene, and we got a chance to sit down with him via the magic of the internet and ask a few questions about his work on Bloodshot and how it came to be.

In the lead up to his return to Bloodshot with issues #10 through #12, we talk to Andreo about his upcoming run.

And check out some of Pedro Andreo’s work from Bloodshot #8 and Bloodshot #10 below!

Graphic Policy: How did you come to work on Bloodshot?

Pedro Andreo: It’s been an exciting ride! Back in December 2019 I was trying to get some interviews with editors at a local comic convention here in Madrid and my portfolio caught the attention of Senior Editor Heather Antos. After a lovely chat and exchanging cards, I did some samples. I was super happy! Not long after, Senior Editor Lysa Hawkins approached me to see if I was available to do Bloodshot 8 (BOY, WAS I!) and it seems my work on it was well-received cause I’m still working on the series! 

GP: How does working for Valiant differ from what you’ve done in the past?

PA: I would say it’s mostly about the style and deadlines. I try to do my best work in every page and every issue, so, to me, the only difference is sticking to a more realistic tone and delivering everything on a tighter schedule!

GP: We’ve seen quite a few talented artists on this series over the course of the last ten issues – do you feel the need to alter your style to keep the comic’s visuals consistent?

PA: Not so much as alter the style completely, but definitely I have some big shoes to fill! Given that my style is influenced not only by US authors but manga and European artists too, I’ve had to alter it slightly to keep it more or less similar to the other great artists that have been working on this series. It’s been a pleasure, though, and a challenge that I’ve fully embraced and keeps me learning, improving and enjoying page after page.

Bloodshot #10

GP: When taking on issues with a gap as you’ve done with #8 and #10, did you get to see the script of #9 to make sure you’re aware of any visual nuance?

PA: I didn’t get the script on issue #9 itself, but that’s mostly on me, because I didn’t ask for it (I know for a fact that Lysa and Tim would have sent it to me within minutes). Reading the script for #10 I got the whole picture fast (Tim is an amazing writer and everything is super clear). The plot itself happens a little after the events of issue 9, so there’s little to no elements that carry over from one to another. In any case, they provided me with enough visual references and the materials I needed to get issue 10 rolling.

GP: With Bloodshot introducing characters, KT and Wiggins, from the Vin Diesel led movie in the tenth issue, was there any pressure (internal or external) to capture the actors’ likenesses or were you able to put a little of your own spin on the characters?

PA: Mostly internal, since Valiant didn’t pressure me at all about it. I’m not a very realistic artist when it comes to facial likeness!

GP: You’ve done some work in Spain and Italy – how does the process differ when working on an American comic?

PA: Not a lot, really. The process itself is practically the same, with a few differences on stylistic choices or mediums. I’m going fully digital on Bloodshot, but I worked on traditional pen and paper (no inking!) for Italy for 5 years, so, although the process of the page and the drawing are the same, there’s some stuff you can and cannot do depending on the medium you’re working on. 

GP: You’ve said that fantasy tends to be where you excel at – is there any character that you’d love to get your hands on?

PA: Oh! Great question! I think I would love to work on Shadowman or Punk Mambo. There’s always so much creativity involved when you have to design magic, other dimensions and such weird stuff. Doctor Mirage would be amazing too. Even X-O Manowar or Eternal Warrior have some fantasy side I would love to explore!

GP: Do you have any other projects for Valiant you’re currently working on you can tell us about? 

PA: Not at the moment! The whole COVID-19 situation has thrown a wrench on all the publishing schedules, as you know, so I’m only working on Bloodshot at the moment. I hope we get back slowly but surely and make some more awesome stuff for you all to enjoy soon enough!

GP: Thanks for chatting and looking forward to checking out the issue!

Bloodshot #8

Bloodshot #10

Review: Bloodshot #9

Bloodshot #9

In a world overrun with monsters, only Bloodshot can end Hell on Earth in Bloodshot #9! What does the gripping conclusion of “Burned” mean for the future of Bloodshot?

The strength of Tim Seeley‘s Bloodshot run has often been the sense of urgency of the story, and the speed in which things happen, which when brought to life by an all-star cast of artistic talent has often had the effect of throwing you into a John Wick film. The series has been relentless. A breath of excitement borne from the action movie pace of the comic; when it’s good, it’s very good. The three-part The Burned arc has taken the action-packed formula to heart and has added in some subtle elements like Godzilla sized monsters.

Oddly, despite the grand theatrics on display, Bloodshot #9 falls flatter than previous entries in the series. There’s a lack of cohesiveness to the comic that’s most evident when it tries to pull of the grand reveal/finale only to leave you wondering what happened.

Without explicitly spoiling the comic I can’t get into specifics, so skip this paragraph if you want to go in blind. Bloodshot, his nanites and Eidolon have concocted a plan to spread his consciousness over two bodies with one being active at once to allow him to move from one place to another in a breath. While I appreciate the originality of the idea, for me it felt like it was used more as a device to cut the length of the story out of necessity rather than as an exploration of what the character is capable of (with assistance from others), and because of the lack of foreshadowing the moment came off as a deus ex machina rather than a planned story beat.

Of course, the above is purely my own feelings on the comic (much like the review as a whole, honestly), and your mileage may vary.

Whether it’s the COVID related gap between the last few issues or the abrupt ending to the current arc, Seeley has a lot to contend with as he pulls plot threads from previous issues into the finale to tie them off faster than one would expect, making this comic a harder entry point for new readers than previous issues.

Seeley is joined by artists Marc Laming and Jason Masters, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy, though the lustre may be wearing a little thin given that there seemed to be a little less flow to what was on the page in some scenes – not every one, but some of the more chaotic fight scenes with the giant monsters were a little harder to follow than fight scenes in earlier comics in the series. Whether this is due to the size of the combatants relative to each other making it harder to choreograph the battle, or the two artists working on the comic not fully jiving together, could be up for debate if the rest of the comic did have the same issues with artistic flow that are apparent in the giant monster scenes.

Bloodshot #9 aside, reading an issue of Seeley’s Bloodshot has always been a great reminder of the excitement I used to have reading comics, and while this issue doesn’t have the same nostalgic magic that previous issues have had, it is still one that’s worth reading if you’re following the series. But it won’t be the best place to start reading the series.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Marc Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 7.0 Art: 8.7 Overall: 8.1 Recommendation: Read

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

Marc Laming Talks Bloodshot and Giant Russian God Beasts

Bloodshot #9

In a world overrun with monsters, only Bloodshot can end Hell on Earth! Bloodshot #9 is out this week and wraps up “Burned” leaving open the future of Bloodshot!

Written by Tim Seeley, Bloodshot #9 features the art of Marc Laming and Jason Masters with colors by Andrew Dalhouse, inks by Adelso Corona, and lettering by Dave Sharpe.

We got a chance to talk to Marc Laming about the series, his “Giant Russian God Beasts” and any pressure from a series in the spotlight due to Hollywood.

Graphic Policy: How did you end up working on Bloodshot?

Marc Laming: I had previously worked for Valiant on a lot of covers and some Ninjak and Archer & Armstrong and always enjoyed working for them. I got an email from Senior Editor Lysa Hawkins when she started at Valiant asking if I would be interested in working with her and I jumped at the chance, I had no idea at the time which book it would be but Lysa had promised me action and adventure. When I eventually found out I would be doing a series of covers and then a short run on Bloodshot I was really happy as I had loved what the relaunched Valiant under Warren Simons had done with the character. I was 100% on board and with Tim Seeley writing the stories it was the icing on the cake.

GP: This Bloodshot story has given you some really interesting things to draw – how much free reign did you get when designing the looks of the characters we see at the end of Bloodshot #7

ML: It was complete free reign as Tim only gave me “Giant Russian God Beasts” as a description of the huge Kaiju – the same with the zombie soldiers and the terrorist supermen. So, I got to just go as mad as I liked. 

GP: With Wigans having a cameo in Bloodshot #9, the issue will likely get some more eyes on it and most likely become an item for collectors. Does that ever cross your mind?

ML: Hahaha it really doesn’t factor into how I approach making comics. I’m really only thinking about making the visuals and storytelling as strong as possible, anything else is a distraction.

Bloodshot #9

GP: Going that route, there are probably new eyes on the series due to the film, is that something you think about as well?

ML: It really doesn’t cross my mind for the same reasons as the last question.

GP: Last time we chatted, you talked about how previous artists on the series influenced you more than the film. With this arc wrapping up, is there an aspect you hope you planted your flag with and carries on?

ML: I hope the Valiant universe gets to have a few of those Russian God Beasts I designed roaming around – I also liked the more human Bloodshot Tim gave us, I hope that I made that work and I’d like to see that continue.

GP: I know you’ve said you’d be interested in an Eternal Warrior story…  is there anything you can tell us about a potential book that hasn’t been announced yet?

ML: Not as yet – sorry.

GP: The last time we spoke, you said that you do too much research on locations. Have you ever been to a place you’ve researched at a later date and imagined the comic taking place in real time?

ML: I’m currently drawing a book set in Paris and once we can all travel again I would really like to go visit the locations I’m drawing to see if I did them justice and I really like the idea that the locations I use the reader could actually visit too.

GP: What have you got in store for us in the near future after Bloodshot #9? Anything that you can tell us?

ML: I’m working on two long-form graphic novels right now – one is a sci fi story and the other is an espionage action-adventure romantic comedy and both have pages set in Paris… Other than that, it’s all very hush hush still.

Preview: Bloodshot #9

BLOODSHOT #9

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by MARC LAMING and JASON MASTERS
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE 
Cover A by TYLER KIRKHAM
Cover B by KAEL NGU
Preorder Variant Cover by JASON METCALF
On sale OCTOBER 14th | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

In a world overrun with monsters, only Bloodshot can end Hell on Earth!

What does the gripping conclusion of “BURNED” mean for the future of Bloodshot?

BLOODSHOT #9

Valiant and H3 Team for Sportgear featuring Bloodshot and Faith

Valiant Entertainment is partnering with H3 Sportgear to deliver an amazing collection of apparel that features fan-favorite characters Bloodshot and Faith!

Treat yourself to some fabulous fashion as H3 Sportgear, via its Pop Cult online store, is proud to offer an exclusive collection based on Valiant Entertainment’s breakout characters. There’s no better way to celebrate Valiant’s characters than wearing this comfy casualwear.

Available right now are two collections available through the Pop Cult online store: Faith Collection: Purchase and
Bloodshot Collection: Purchase

Valiant Gets Puzzled

Valiant Entertainment is partnering with Mighty Mojo Toys for new captivating puzzles!
 
Challenge yourself and bring together all the pieces of two 500-piece puzzles featuring a multitude of characters from across the Valiant Universe!

Available right now for purchase are these two puzzles to enjoy at home:

  • Valiant Comics Universe Jigsaw Puzzle: Purchase HERE
  • Bloodshot Jigsaw Puzzle: Purchase HERE

Both of these puzzles are available for $14.99.

Bloodshot has “One Last Shot” in January

Get ready for rampage as the action-packed storyline “One Last Shot” begins this January in Bloodshot #10!

For the explosive final arc of Tim Seeley‘s critically-acclaimed run, the New York Times best-selling writer will be joined by industry icon Brett Booth and the amazingly talented Pedro Andreo to unleash all kinds of mayhem as Bloodshot faces retribution. The upcoming storyline will also feature two characters from Bloodshot’s blockbuster movie starring Vin Diesel: Wilfred Wigans and KT!

Seeley enjoyed building a past for Wigans, hinting that the upcoming tale introduces a familiar face for longtime Bloodshot fans.

Bloodshot #10, Part 1 of “One Last Shot”, goes on sale January 13th, 2021.

Bloodshot #10

Review: Bloodshot #8

Bloodshot #8

In Bloodshot #8, unthinkable monsters are unleashing Hell on Earth! Surrounded by enemies, who can Bloodshot trust?

It has been a long time since the previous issue was released, although there was an expanded edition with some bonus features released last month under the guise of Bloodshot #7 Fully Loaded Edition, but there wasn’t any new story content in that comic. On the off chance you didn’t pick that one up just for the bonus features, and I understand why you may not have, the good news is that you don’t need to remember Bloodshot #7 all that much to be able to enjoy this book because writer Tim Seeley has structured the comic in such a way that a chunk of time has passed between issues seven and eight. It’s not explicitly stated how much time, and whether this was an incredible stroke of luck given the break between issues because of Covid 19, or Seeley was able to adjust the dialogue just enough to convey a longer chunk of time passing than he originally intended, I’m not sure.

Frankly, as far as my enjoyment of the comic goes, I don’t particularly care which it was because the story and dialogue flow so well across every page (but I am genuinely curious as to whether he needed to adjust the text at all).

The story finds Bloodshot atoning for releasing a horde of formerly imprisoned enemies that all have some form of super powers, and may or may not have been used by their respective governments. Granted, he wasn’t in control of himself when he did it, but still he feels responsible for unleashing what he has.

Bloodshot has been one fast-paced and frenetic issue after another. It has been a great ride for the last seven issues. I’ve certainly enjoyed the series for what it is; a popcorn comic that has a depth to it that’s revealed further with each issue. Tim Seeley gives you a little more of his plan with each release. There are moments in this issue that change or enhance your idea of the characterizations of some characters inbetween the action. It’s this balance that allows you to fly through the book while still feeling like you’ve read more than the twenty-odd pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph or two feel familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing when my feelings on the books hasn’t changed. Personally, I love how this book looks. The lines are clean and it’s very easy to discern what’s happening on every page. It’s an awesome book that consistently surprises me.

Every time I open an issue of Seeley’s Bloodshot, it reminds me why I love reading comics; it’s fun, looks great, and there’s always more meat to the story on the second and third read through as you pick up on the subtleties of Seeley’s dialogue and the details in the art. You can’t go wrong with this book – it’s a must-read for all the right reasons.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Marc Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.


Purchase: comiXologyKindleZeus Comics

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