Tag Archives: bill morrison

Preview: The Beatles Yellow Submarine

THE BEATLES YELLOW SUBMARINE

Writer/Artist: Bill Morrison
Inks: Andrew Pepoy
Colors: Nathan Kane
Lettering: Aditya Bidikar
Publisher: Titan Comics
Hardcover, 292mm x 190mm
112pp, $29.99/£26.99
On Sale: August 28, 2018
ISBN: 9781785863943

Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine comes this fully authorized graphic novel adaptation.

The music-loving, underwater paradise of Pepperland has been overrun by the music-hating Blue Meanies and their leader, Chief Blue Meanie.

They turn the people of Pepperland into living statues by dropping apples on them and imprison the Pepperland’s guardians, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band inside a soundproof blue glass globe, before confiscating all the music instruments in the land. Pepperland’s mayor sends aging sailor, Young Fred out in the fabled Yellow Submarine to find help. He travels to our world where he stumbles across the Beatles and begs them to help him free his world. They agree and head back to Pepperland, teaming up with Jeremy The Nowhere Man along the way to help overthrow the evil Blue Meanies through the power of music and love.

SDCC 2018: Titan Comics Announces The Beatles Yellow Submarine Limited Edition Box Set!

At San Diego Comic-Con, Titan Comics announced The Beatles Yellow Submarine Limited Edition Box Set, limited to 1968 copies, contains the following items: the critically acclaimed Yellow Submarine graphic novel, a 6.5-inch Yellow Submarine figurine/vinyl, 16 Yellow Submarine lobby cards plus four Yellow Submarine posters (based on the originals), five Beatles badges, a replica Yellow Submarine movie premiere ticket, and an exclusive art card signed by Bill Morrison. This 50th Anniversary Limited Edition is lavishly presented in a beautifully illustrated box.

The box set will be available October 10, 2018.

The Beatles Yellow Submarine Graphic Novel Gets a Trailer

Titan Comics has released a brand-new The Beatles Yellow Submarine graphic novel adaptation to tie-in with the 50th Anniversary of the release of The Beatles iconic animated film, Yellow Submarine.

The Beatles are recruited by the Captain of the Yellow Submarine to help him free Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, and the world of Pepperland from the music-hating Blue Meanies.

Written and illustrated by Bill Morrison, with colors by Nathan Kane, this fully authorized graphic novel adaptation hits stores on August 28, 2018.

New York Comic Con 2017: Bill Morrison Named New Executive Editor of MAD Magazine

During New York Comic Con, DC Publishers Dan DiDio and Jim Lee used their “Meet the Publishers” panel to kick of the Con and give a “State of the Union” overview of what comic fans can expect next from the home of the World’s Greatest Super Heroes.

At this year’s panel bestselling writer Grant Morrison made a surprise appearance. Morrison didn’t come empty handed either; lucky fans got a chance to see the newest art from longtime collaborator Yanick Paquette from their upcoming original graphic novel, Wonder Woman Earth One Vol. 2. Grant talked with Dan and Jim about his vision for this next chapter of Diana’s journey through Man’s world and what surprises readers can expect along the way.

The publishers had a little more “Morrison” in store for fans when they introduced Eisner award-winning artist and National Cartoonists Society president Bill Morrison as the new Executive Editor of MAD Magazine. Bill chatted with Dan and Jim about the legacy of MAD, the transition from New York to Burbank and his vision for continuing MAD Magazine’s role as America’s #1 home for humor and satire (in a field of one).

Preview: Adventure Time/Regular Show #2 (of 6)

Adventure Time/Regular Show #2 (of 6)

Publisher: KaBOOM, an imprint of BOOM! Studios
Writer: Conor McCreery
Artist: Mattia Di Meo
Cover Artists:
Main Cover: Philip Murphy
Intermix Cover: Philip Murphy
Subscription Cover: Jason Ho
Mash-Up Homage Variant Cover: Bill Morrison

After escaping the attacks on the Candy Kingdom, Finn and Jake are in a totally not mathematical face-off with Mordecai and Rigby.

Preview: Lobo/Road Runner Special #1

Lobo/Road Runner Special #1

(W) Bill Morrison (A) Bill Morrison (A/CA) Kelley Jones
RATED T
In Shops: Jun 21, 2017
SRP: $4.99

Wile E. Coyote travels to the far reaches of space to hire Lobo to hunt down and kill his greatest nemesis of all time, the Road Runner. And when the Coyote and Lobo are after him, the Road Runner knows if they catch him-he’s through. And the bonus Looney Tunes backup story features DC characters with story and art by Bill Morrison!

Review: Love is Love

loveislovefiOn June 12, 2016, a hateful man killed 49 people and wounded 53 at The Pulse, a gay club in Orlando, Florida. This was a terrible day for the LGBTQ community, and I was just plain sad. A couple weeks ago, I had celebrated getting a job and moving to a new city with a few friends at a couple gay clubs in my old home of Richmond, Virginia so a thought went through my head, “It could have been me.” Even though I am relatively privileged as a white cisgendered, relatively straight passing bisexual male, I had no queer friends in my new home to turn to and confide in after the events in Orlando. But what got me through was the queer comics and comics journalism community, and my Facebook inboxes and Twitter DM’s were filled with messages of hope and understanding. I may have felt alone in my current situation, but these beautiful people, many of whom I have never met in the flesh, got me through the tough days after the Pulse shooting.

The Love is Love comics anthology project from IDW Publishing with assistance from DC Comics, Archie Comics, Aftershock, and the Will Eisner estate gave me a similar feeling of the comics community coming together to mourn after The Pulse shooting. While reading the graphic novel, I simultaneously felt sadness and hope and remembered that despite the scandals that the comics industry has some great folks, whose excellent work appears in this comic. I enjoyed how well-represented all genders, races, sexualities, and religions were in Love is Love along with the different art styles and color palette. On a pure aesthetic level, most of the stories in Love is Love hit two of my favorite genre sweet spots: superhero and autobio, which made it a great read on both an emotional and intellectual level.

Honestly, I could write a book about the brilliant one to three page stories, poems, and pinups in Love is Love, and maybe I will one day. For the purpose of this review, I will hit on a few that affected me personally; those stories that through words, art, colors, and letters gave me comfort as I thought back to Orlando.

batwomanPaul Dini‘s Harley and Ivy story is insanely adorable and nails their romantic relationship in a nutshell with each one making compromises for the each other. For example, Harley goes vegetarian while Ivy is subjected to a Three Stooges marathon. Bill Morrison‘s art is very similar to the style of Batman: Animated Series and peppered with all kinds of background details to add to the humor. Another funny story (Albeit darker than Harley and Ivy shenanigans.) that provided some great comic relief in the midst of the emotionally headier material of Love is Love was a Deathstroke one by Taran Killam where he switches out his arsenal of guns for karate after the Pulse shooting. Gallows humor is a great way to stave off pain.

As someone whose sexuality is still not accepted by those close to me and was afraid to come out until I was 19, Love is Love‘s portrayal of homophobia is harrowing, yet all too relatable. Early, in the book, Daniel Beals and David Lafuente do a splitscreen story where two young boys see the same news coverage of The Pulse, but react in vastly different ways because of their parent’s homophobia and empathy respectively. Then, there is a nuanced story from Jeff King and Steve Pugh where a girl is sad about the shooting and wants to go to the memorial service, but her dad is uneasy about men kissing men. Later, he realizes how thoughtless he was and apologizes. I know Pugh from his superhero work on Fantastic Four and Detective Comics, and this appeal for forgiveness was just as fictional as Batman or Reed Richards in my own life.

The stories that bypassed my head and went straight to my heart strings were ones that focused on queer clubs as sanctuaries. In six pulsing panels and two pages, comics legends Grant Morrison and Jesus Merino capture the beat with alternating colors and skeletons in the background. Without a word, an image engulfed my mind and reminded me of fog lights, cute boys, and too many Long Island ice teas. In a similar vein, Emma Houxbois and Alejandra Gutierrez looked at the escapism of a queer club experience complete with cuties and the sad realities of the morning after. (Full disclosure: I worked closely with Emma on the Fantheon podcast and at the websites The Rainbow Hub and Pop Optiq and she has contributed to this site.) The comic had a soft color palette and intelligent narration while still connecting to my personal experiences and of other LGBTQ people. And it was followed by a silent comic by Brian Michael Bendis, his daughter Olivia Bendis, Michael Oeming, and Taki Soma that captured the joy and energy of a queer night club with people dancing with they wanted to and bright colors everywhere courtesy of Soma.

Many of the creators, who were from Florida, had very personal stories to share about the LGBTQ community of Orlando, which were sad and enjoyable, like Scott Snyder, who wrote a prose piece with a spot illustration by Jock about working at Disney World, and how some of the queer employees, who played various Disney characters, would invite him to a gay bar every Thursday and accept him.

Love is Love gave me an opportunity to listen to the stories of some queer comics creators that I have admired for quite some time, like James Tynion and Phil Jimenez. Tynion’s story was drawn in black and white by artist Molly Ostertag except for splotches of rainbow in the bracelet that he got as a youngster. It skips time frantically in a two page story as he comes to terms with his sexuality cutting from him spending time with his friends at Pride to facing the fact that he is a bisexual boy at an all-boy’s Catholic school. Jimenez did his comic with his writer friend David Kim and talked about how they had grown up from using codenames to show that they are dating men to being out and proud DC Comics creators. The comic is filled with snatches of conversations they had about relationships and even superhero oddities as they reflect on their friendship after the events in Orlando. Jimenez also excels at wispy, life drawing as well as superheroes, Amazons, and the Invisible College.

The queer DC Comics character that means the most to me is definitely Midnighter, and I was happy to see him featured in a couple of the Love is Love stories. The first one is by Dan DiDio and Carlos D’Anda and acts as a crash course in DC’s LGBTQ characters. It’s pretty amusing and features Midnighter and Apollo doing shots of tequila and getting on the dance floor with Batwoman as Renee Montoya snarks from the sides. The other one was my favorite story of the entire Love is Love collection from Tom Taylor, Emily Smith, and Michael Garland. Midnighter was angry after The Pulse shooting just like I was angry, and Garland punctuates his anger with a red background. He’s just punching aimlessly when Apollo shows up and says that he is not alone and will be safe with him. This kind of solidarity between queer people in the face of death and tragedy truly empowered me as Taylor makes good use of Midnighter’s vulnerable side that is the emotional center of Steve Orlando’s current work on his title.

Other highlights of Love is Love included Tom King and Mitch Gerads doing a rainbow-tinted Batman tale, Sterling Gates returning to Supergirl and writing about how she failed to save the day, married couple Amanda Seibert and Cat Staggs showing Batwoman comforting a child, whose mother died at The Pulse, and much more. There’s even a wonderful, yet vulnerable riff on Beauty and the Beast from Marguerite Bennett and Aneke where Bennett, and an LGBT-inclusive riff on DC’s old romance comics from project creator Marc Andreyko with art from George Perez, Karl Kesel, and Laura Allred.  A full list of collaborators on Love is Love can be found here, and I definitely plan on delving into their other work.

Love is Love is personal, beautiful, and tragic collection of comics that really affected me despite their being more “ally” creators than LGBTQ ones. I hope it will make the world a more loving and inclusive place even in the shadow of the election of two homophobes to the office of president and vice president.

As Batman says in King and Gerads’ story, “Today, I will get up. Today, I will face their hate… And I will again fight for my love.” Visual and verbal moments like that are why I love comics.

Story: Various Art: Various
Story: 9.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dead Vengeance HC

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It’s 1940, and a phony body on exhibit in a carnival sideshow suddenly springs to life and shambles away. Not so phony after all: he is John Doe, radio commentator and archenemy of Detroit’s notorious Purple Gang. But why did he disappear in 1930, and why did the mayor, the mob, and the cops all want him dead? This collects Dead Vengeance #1–#4.

Dead Vengeance is supernatural noir at its finest. Taking the premise of a man who has lost his wife after, he has threatened to expose the corruption of the mayor, and his cronies. Adding a solid twist, as the real culprit of the murder is put in jail, preventing John from getting his vengeance. Bolstering the solid noir inspired story, as John gets murdered himself by a circus freak. Yet John, lives in state of un-death as his dead body floats in a traveling circus. As his spirit waits to return to take his vengeance.

If the story wasn’t already noir enough, the art work bolsters that atmosphere. The action scenes are gorgeous, and explosive at times. I love how they drew historically accurate clothes for the characters. It manages to make the world feel authentic, yet fictional.

Story: Bill Morrison Art: Bill Morrison, Tone Rodriguez
Story: 9.5 Art: 10 Overall: 9.75 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Dead Vengeance #1

dv1It’s 1940, and a phony body on exhibit in a carnival sideshow suddenly springs to life and shambles away. Not so phony after all, he is John Doe, radio commentator and archenemy of Detroit’s notorious Purple Gang! But why did he disappear in 1930, and why did the mayor, the mob, and the cops all want him dead?

The story of Dead Vengeance is positioned almost as a murder mystery, with the newly awakened John Doe trying to find out how he ended up as a dead body in a carnival side show, and why; who was he before he “died,” and what nefarious scheme could have taken him away from his previous life. Further more, what does he do now he’s awake, and no longer dead?

Dead Vengeance is, apparently, ideal for fans of The Goon, but as I have never read that comic series I can’t truthfully tell you whether that’s true. What I can tell you, though, is that Dead Vengeance #1 is awesome.

Bill Morrison handles both the writing and penciling here, and is joined by Keith Champagne and Carlos Badilla who provide inks and colours respectively. As a creative team they work together very well, giving us a comic that’s very easy on the eyes as you read it. The art style feels like an updated version of a crime comic produced in the late 40’s to early 50’s, but with enough of a modern flavour to feel fresh and exciting to today’s audiences. 

Dead Vengeance #1 isn’t exactly laugh out loud funny, but that being said there were several moments where I found myself chortling at a panel, smirking at a conversation held between characters or having a smile at something fairly simple as I read trough this issue; despite the dark subject matter this Dead Vengeance is a surprisingly fun comic, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. There are some scenes during this comic where it feels very much as if Bill Morrison is poking fun at established tropes, and what would usually be seen as a deus ex machina type coincidence can and should be laughed at in many ways because of how the characters react to those situations. It’s a nice tongue in cheek take on what could easily have been enough to turn some readers away from the comic.

Dead Vengeance may not sound like it’ll be up your alley, and maybe it isn’t but if nothing else you should still flick through the pages when you go to your comics retailer; who knows, maybe you’ll be intrigued. This concept – that of a (possible) murder victim solving their own murder – is one that may not be entirely original, it is presented here with a fresh take and enough humour to make it worth adding to your pull list. 

Story: Bill Morrison Art: Bill Morrison, Keith Champagne, Carlos Badilla
Story: 8 Art: 8 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Dark Horse provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Mars Attacks #1 Sells Out in a Big Way!

[Mars Attacks The Holidays Cover]IDW Publishing has announced that Mars Attacks #1 has sold out of its “substantial” first printing.  The first issue is by John Layman and John McCrea. The first issue was pretty ambitious sporting 56 covers and a deluxe box set had a 57th cover.  That’s nearly 55,000 issues gone. IDW says there’s likely less than 1,000 copies of the “classic card cover” floating about.

IDW is taking the opportunity to announce Mars Attacks The Holidays. Coming out in October, this new one-shot is being created as a unique, off-the-wall take on Mars Attacks and will see Topps’ vicious Martian invaders reigning chaos upon beloved holiday icons the world over. The comic features four stories by Dean Haspiel, Fred Hembeck, Ian Boothby, and Bill Morrison, and is 48 full-color pages.

Mars Attacks #1 is a full-color, 32-page comic that is in stores now. Diamond order code: APR120315 and Mars Attacks The Holidays is a full-color, 48-page comic that will be in stores October 24, 2012.

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