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People’s History of the Marvel Universe, Week 19: The Racial Problematics of “Snap Wilson”

As discussed last time, starting in Captain America and the Falcon #120, various Marvel writers[1] made a good deal of use out of the Falcon’s secret identity as Sam Wilson, social worker – Stan Lee used it as a vehicle for stories about youth problems, organized crime, and urban unrest (albeit ones that ended with costumed superheroes getting into punch-ups with similarly-attired supervillains), while Steve Englehart and Alan Weiss used it as a pretext to have Captain America and the Falcon investigate abuse in America’s prisons and encounter the Queen of the Werewolves.[2]

This changes in Captain America and the Falcon #186, where (in a follow-up to the original story that introduced Sam Wilson) the Red Skull reveals that everything we knew about Sam Wilson was a lie:

These four panels are worthy of some in-depth textual analysis. In the first, we see the young and innocent Sam Wilson on the rooftops of Harlem, complete with a thematic association between birds and freedom that we’ll later see embodied in his relationship with his falcon Redwing. (In future issues, this part of his backstory will be retconned to add in tragic violent crime-related deaths for both his mother and father that will inspire his vigilantism.) In the second, we see Wilson heading to Florida (like a lot of New Yorkers in the winter) only to be confronted with the specter of rural bigotry in Dade County, in a scene straight out of the shock ending of Easy Rider. By the third panel, we see that the experience has hardened our hero, and by the time that he gets to Los Angeles he’s learned to “get by” in the worlds of both street crime (as symbolized by the small crowd of black men standing on the corner) and organized crime (as symbolized by the white hand coming out of the car window). In the fourth panel, the transformation of Sam Wilson into “Snap” Wilson is complete – he’s now an L.A-based gangster complete with mob connections, a pimped-out Cadillac with vanity license plates, and some of the 70’s wildest fashions.

As we learn about on the next page, rather than arriving on the island of forbidden love as part of a vacation-turned-resistance-movement, “Snap” Wilson crash-landed on the island after attempting to hijack a small plane containing a “fortune” (presumably of drugs, given that the plane was returning from a trip to Latin America) belonging to the “Big Man,” his L.A-based crime boss.

More significantly, we learn that the social Sam Wilson that readers thought they knew was a creation of the Red Skull, a fiction specifically designed to appeal to Steve Rogers’ liberal values:

Steve Englehart, John Warner, and Frank Robbins had to lean heavily on the Cosmic Cube’s, well…cosmic powers here, because this is quite a retcon. Above and beyond the psychological impact on Wilson himself, the creative team had to explain how it was that we’ve seen Sam Wilson at work as a social worker – we’ve even seen his office with clients in it! – and it would be particularly odd for the Cube to somehow have also altered the memories of the entire “Social Admin” Department of New York City so that someone without official hiring paperwork or credentials would be given office space, a salary, and a caseload for several years.

This being a superhero comic, the retcon is then used by the Red Skull (once again using mind control) to pit the Falcon against Captain America in a lose-lose fight to the death. Naturally, Captain America triumphs and destroys the Red Skull’s HYDRA base, only for the Skull himself to flee to fight another day. Rather than resolving neatly in one issue like earlier “Cap goes evil” storylines, the dangling plot thread of “Snap” Wilson and the dueling backstories continues to dominate the book for the next several issues.

For example, in Captain America and the Falcon #189, Tony Isabella and Frank Robbins have Captain America once more fight Sam Wilson in a dubious SHIELD experiment to prove which is the real personality.

After a bunch of illusionary shenanigans, the Falcon snaps out of his “schizophrenic” state to reveal that, in fact, it is “Snap” Wilson who was the true personality and Sam Wilson who was the fake.

Tony Isabella, Bill Mantlo, and Frank Robbins would return to (and in their own words “bring to a close the end of an epic”) plot in issue #191, in which “Snap” Wilson is put on trial in Los Angeles County Court for the “importation and sale of illegal narcotics”: 

The Falcon is only saved from prison when, in a bid to prevent him from turning state’s witness against his former mob associates, the “Big Man” of Los Angeles hires, of all the many Marvel villains-for-hire, the Stilt-Man to attack the courthouse and assassinate the Falcon before he can testify. As one might guess, the ensuing action allows the Falcon to demonstrate his heroism to the judge, leading to a suspended sentence of parole (with Nick Fury of SHIELD standing in as his parole officer), thus demonstrating the fairness and mercy of the American court system when dealing with black defendants up on drugs charges in the first wave of Nixon’s War on Drugs.

The racial politics of this retcon are bizarre to say the least. The new “Snap” Wilson behaves like a quite different character than the one readers had known for sixty-nine issues: he’s more aggressive and violent both in interpersonal communication and combat, he uses stereotypical “jive” slang, and he’s far more cynical about white America and white institutions – an interesting departure for a character previously given to attempts at “cooling down” racial tensions. One could see it as an extrapolation of the “talker” versus “fighter” dynamic between Sam Wilson, social worker, and the vigilante known as the Falcon, if not for the charged nature of “Snap” Wilson’s gangster origin.

Two potential explanations for this change suggest themselves. The first is that we need to see this in the context of Marvel chasing the trend of blaxploitation, more prominently seen in the creation of the characters Luke Cage and Blade at around the same time. A streetwise gangster simply fits into the rather narrow schema of the blaxploitation genre better than a social worker out of a prestige “problem” film. However, Captain America and the Falcon was an established comic rather than a newer, more speculative venture like Power Man, and more importantly it was the comic of their flagship “flag suit” character, which tends to come with higher visibility and tighter editorial control within the company.

The second explanation, and one that has a certain amount of plausibility given that Cap #186 was authored by noted liberal Steve Englehart (just coming off of having Captain America go up against Richard Nixon), is that the retcon was prompted by a weird white liberal guilt trip that judo-flipped its way into being accidentally racist. Sam Wilson, as originally envisioned by Stan Lee, was an “articulate,” clean-cut, politically moderate black professional. It may have been argued at the time that the character of the Falcon was a paternalistically condescending bit of outreach to the black community from a bunch of white middle aged middle class folks at Marvel.  By contrast, a more “street” character, as we’ve already said more evocative of popular trends in black culture, who challenges the white establishment more consistently than before, may have been seen as a more “authentic” portrait of black masculinity in the 1970s. If so, it’s a very strange train of thought where an attempt to be racially sensitive boomerangs back around to being back-handedly racist.

The problem with this line of political logic is the question of representation. There’s nothing inherently wrong with an individual character having a backstory of coming from the “mean streets” of crime, but when you’re dealing with a situation in which there are very few characters of color in Marvel comics (especially back in the 1970s when the main struggle within Marvel was over introducing racial “firsts”), aspects of those characters become less individualized and more archetypal. When most if not all of Marvel’s black characters at the time came from “the street,” it starts to send a message that, according to Marvel creative and editorial (again, staffed almost entirely by white men), the “street” is where black characters come from. This becomes problematic when it means that having a black character with a different background – like, for example, a professional social worker – is seen as less “realistic” than an ex-hood.

So much for the “epic” of “Snap” Wilson. I know there are going to be some in the fandom who will say that, given the realities of a serial medium produced monthly over the course of almost fifty years by a variety of creative and editorial teams of varying levels of ability and care for the material, you’re going to get some bad stories worked in there. These stories – if left unchecked – can warp characters out of being usable recurring intellectual property, which is why retcons aren’t always a bad thing because they can right a sinking ship in the wake of a particularly ill-thought-out or poorly executed creative turn.

This is why, when we talk about the impact of a given story in comics, we can’t just talk about the aesthetic merit of a given panel or page or comic, but its longevity – did a given story have an enduring impression on the book and the larger Marvel Universe, or was it a flash in the pan that was swiftly cleaned up by the next team to work on the book?

The answer to that question is why the “Snap” Wilson retcon is such a big deal: it lasted for forty years, putting it up there as one of the longest-lasting retcons in Marvel history. It was the status quo when Steve Englehart left the book, it was the status quo when Jack Kirby returned to both write and draw the book (more on that in a future issue), it was the status quo for Mark Gruenwald’s classic run in the 80s, and it was the status quo for Ed Brubaker’s run that set the terms for the MCU Captain America films.

It wouldn’t change until 2015, when as part of the Avengers NOW! event[3] Sam Wilson was promoted to the role of Captain America for the first time (although not the first time that he’d worn the uniform) – a creative and editorial decision that would ultimately give rise to the Disney+ Falcon and Winter Soldier show. In All-New Captain America #3, intending to discredit as well as kill the new Captain America, Sin (the Red Skull’s daughter) and HYDRA engages in information warfare by releasing to the public the sordid details of “Snap” Wilson’s past:

To a significant extent, Remender designs All-New Captain America #3 to be in dialogue with Englehart’s Captain America and the Falcon #186 – no less than three pages out of the book are devoted to a beat-for-beat reproduction of the story of the Red Skull using the Cosmic Cube to re-write Sam Wilson’s backstory, for example. The major difference is that, rather than staying in a mind-controlled silent stupor while Steve Rogers plays the interlocutor to the Red Skull, here Sam Wilson is allowed to speak and he challenges Sin’s characterization of his past as a “liar, thug, and gangster” as “lies.” (Remender does his own editorializing by characterizing the “Snap Wilson” backstory as a “smear campaign” and presenting Sin as clearly an unreliable narrator given to monologuing about the victors rewriting history to suit their interests.)

In foiling both Sin’s smear campaign and (somewhat more importantly) her bomb plot, Sam Wilson defiantly asserts a brand-new status quo for his own backstory:

While Rick Remender is a writer whose politics I haven’t always agreed with – only two years before this issue, Remender had written Uncanny Avengers #5, which featured the now-infamous “M word” speech, and then reacted extremely poorly to criticism over how this speech handled the topic of minority identities and the mutant metaphor – I think he was on the right track in this case.

As I’ve suggested above in discussing the question of representation, “ex-gangster from the mean streets” was already something of a “tired stereotype” back in 1975, and it was only more of one in 2015 when you consider the increase in the raw numbers of African-American characters in big two comics, given how many of those new characters had been given “street” backgrounds themselves. By contrast, there is something innovative about a social worker backstory not just from the perspective of African-American characters but superheroes in general: whereas most heroes with secret identities are cops, private detectives, reporters (because those professions involve being “nosy” and thus lend themselves to story hooks involving investigations), or scientists (which lends itself to super-science story hooks), there really aren’t that many heroes who belong to one of the “caring” professions. As we discussed back in Week 18, social workers have a unique perspective on social phenomena, while still giving rise to sixty issues worth of story hooks.

Ultimately, however, the question of whether a given character’s backstory is innovative or stereotypical is rather subjective. Which is why the subjectivity of the creative and editorial teams matters – and why it mattered that for so long that the teams working on Captain America and the Falcon were all-white (as well-meaning as they might have been). Had there been more diversity in the room at the time, black creators might have been able to push back on the “Snap” Wilson retcon from the beginning instead of having to wait forty years for a white creator to decide it wasn’t all right.  


[1] Between Cap #120 and #186, there wasn’t a regular artist on the book on issues covering Sam Wilson as a social worker: artists ranged from Gene Colan on #120 and 134 to John Romita Sr. on #139 to Sal Buscema on #149 to Alan Weiss and John Romita Sr. on #164.

[2] A story notable for being the first but by no means the last time that CapWolf became a part of Marvel Comics. More on that in a future issue of People’s History of the Marvel Universe.

[3] Itself a continuation of the All-New Marvel NOW! event from 2013, which itself was a continuation of Marvel NOW! from 2012, but which shouldn’t be confused with All-New, All-Different Marvel which would launch later in 2015, eventually giving rise to the Secret Empire event. Needless to say, Marvel editorial hasn’t exactly made things easier for comics historians in their naming conventions in recent years.

Preview: Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors

Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors

(W) Bill Mantlo, Ralph Macchio, Steve Parkhouse, Simon Furman (A) Kim DeMulder, Frank Springer, John Ridgeway, Mike Collins (A/CA) Guido Guidi
In Shops: Apr 07, 2021
SRP: $7.99

Some events in history are so incredible, that they’ve gone down in legend-epic tales of epic heroes and villains. Others remain shrouded in mystery, only surfacing as snippets of the real story. Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors is the perfect companion book to the Secrets & Lies mini-series. Representing the classic stories that inspired the series: “The Transformers” (Transformers #1), “Man of Iron” (Transformers UK #9-12), and the Transformers ’84 #0 one-shot!

Transformers '84: Legends & Rumors

Preview: Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors

Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors

(W) Bill Mantlo, Ralph Macchio, Steve Parkhouse, Simon Furman (A) Kim DeMulder, Frank Springer, John Ridgeway, Mike Collins (A/CA) Guido Guidi
In Shops: Apr 07, 2021
SRP: $7.99

Some events in history are so incredible, that they’ve gone down in legend-epic tales of epic heroes and villains. Others remain shrouded in mystery, only surfacing as snippets of the real story. Transformers ’84: Legends & Rumors is the perfect companion book to the Secrets & Lies mini-series. Representing the classic stories that inspired the series: “The Transformers” (Transformers #1), “Man of Iron” (Transformers UK #9-12), and the Transformers ’84 #0 one-shot!

Transformers '84: Legends & Rumors

Captain Universe, Daredevil, and Harlequin Manga are Today’s New Digital Releases

Today’s new digital releases sees five new comics from Marvel and Harlequin. Get shopping now or check out the individual releases below.

Captain Universe: Power Unimaginable

Written by Gerry Conway, Eric Fein, Tony Isabella, Bill Mantlo, Dan Slott
Art by June Brigman, Steve Ditko, Neil Errar, Rick Leonardi, Bill Wylie
Cover by Steve Ditko
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Collects Marvel Spotlight #9-11, Incredible Hulk Annual #10, Marvel Fanfare #25, Web Of Spider-Man Annual #5-6, Marvel Comics Presents #148 And Cosmic Power Unlimited #5.

He’s the hero who could be YOU…but in these stories, being a burglar, a college professor and an astronaut will have to do! Whether it’s half-sized as a child or doubled as twins, the Uni-Power transforms its lucky recipient into Captain Universe — countering crises that range from a masked marauder to the edge of apocalypse! Guest-starring the Hulk, doing the non-mutant cosmic super-hero thing years before Spider-Man made it popular!

Captain Universe: Power Unimaginable

Daredevil Vol. 12: Decalogue

Written by Brian Michael Bendis
Art by Alex Maleev
Cover by Alex Maleev
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Collects Daredevil (1998) #71-75.

The wait is over! Exactly what happened during Daredevil’s year-long reign as the new Kingpin? His historic cleaning of Hell’s Kitchen will finally be revealed in bloody detail. Framed around the Ten Commandments, this epic story is like nothing you’ve seen before!

Daredevil Vol. 12: Decalogue

Daredevil Vol. 13: Murdock Papers

Written by Brian Michael Bendis
Art by Alex Maleev
Cover by Alex Maleev
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Collects Daredevil (1998) #76-81.

The Eisner Award-winning run of Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev comes to a blistering conclusion! First, they outed Daredevil in the press, then they married him and made him the Kingpin of Hell’s Kitchen. What could they possibly do to top that? Four words: WILSON FISK IS BACK!

Daredevil Vol. 13: Murdock Papers

A Royal Mission: Royally Wed

Written by Elizabeth August
Art by Nanami Akino
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Victoria, kidnapped and bound, is dazed when Lance, a royal bodyguard, comes to rescue her. She doesn’t know who Lance is or where he is taking her, but Victoria slowly becomes fascinated by this protective, caring man. But Lance must reveal a secret to Victoria that will change her life forever…

A Royal Mission: Royally Wed

Un Bébé Pour Jack

Written by Emma Darcy
Art by Eri Nakanuki
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Jack sombre dans le désespoir après que Nina, l’amour de sa vie, l’ait soudainement quitté. Huit mois plus tard, voilà qu’il retombe sur elle, mais cette fois, à la maternité ! Incapable de renoncer à Nina, Jack s’arme de détermination : avec ou sans bébé, il doit la reconquérir. Or, Nina ne parvient pas à lui faire confiance et le repousse fermement. En effet, elle connaît son tempérament impétueux et elle sait qu’il déteste les enfants. Malgré l’obstination de Nina, Jack veut lui prouver son amour, alors il se lance donc dans l’éducation de sa fille à peine arrivée dans ce monde… À présent, il doit leur prouver qu’il les aime toutes les deux!

Un Bébé Pour Jack

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Preview: Michael Golden’s Micronauts Artist Edition

Michael Golden’s Micronauts Artist Edition

(W) Bill Mantlo (A/CA) Michael Golden
In Shops: Nov 04, 2020
SRP: $150.00

Michael Golden is regarded as one of the masters of comic art, and his long-out-of-print Micronauts is regarded as the “holy grail” among his many legions of fans. Now, through special arrangement with Marvel Comics and Hasbro, IDW is proud to present Golden’s Micronauts work in the multi-Eisner Award-winning Artist’s Edition format.

An Artist’s Edition showcases comic book original art in its most natural state, allowing the reader the opportunity to not only look at beautiful pages, but to also read the stories as well. It is the perfect opportunity for the true connoisseur of the form to experience art as never before. Each page has been meticulously scanned from the original art (in color, to show all the subtle nuances-blue pencil, white-out, staining-that make original art unique) and is presented at the same size they were drawn.

This gorgeous edition, prepared with the full cooperation of Michael Golden, will feature complete issues from Micronauts #7, #9, #11, and #12 (and possibly another!). Additionally, more pages be printed, something from EVERY issue, plus an incredible gallery section of covers and rare and images–No Michael Golden fan can afford to miss this book!

Michael Golden's Micronauts Artist Edition

ComiXology has 9 New Digital Comics from DC, Marvel, and Harlequin

ComiXology has a nice mix of new, old, and manga in today’s digital comics releases on the platform. There’s a total of nine new digital comics available now for purchase. You can get them all right now or check out the individual issues below.

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #13

Written by Alan Burnett, Paul Dini
Pencils Ty Templeton
Inks Ty Templeton
Colored by Monica Kubina
Cover by Becky Cloonan
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The Joker turns to a familiar face as he looks to take down the Red Hood. Can Batman track down his former partner before the Clown Prince of Crime strikes, or is this just what Jason wants?

Batman: The Adventures Continue (2020-) #13

Champions Classic Vol. 1

Written by Chris Claremont, Tony Isabella, Bill Mantlo
Art by John Byrne, Vince Colletta, Bob Hall, Don Heck, George Tuska
Cover by Gil Kane
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Collects Champions #1-11.

Okay, a god, a demon, a spy and two mutants walk into… resulting in some of the strangest scenarios of the ’70s! It’s gods vs. heroes in the City of Angels! With mad scientists, Russian super-spies, and guest-stars from Marvel’s western and horror eras! Plus: the secrets of the Black Widow! Featuring Hawkeye!

Champions Classic Vol. 1

Champions Classic Vol. 2

Written by John Byrne, Bill Mantlo, Jim Shooter
Art by John Byrne, Bob Hall, George Tuska
Cover by Ernie Chan
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Collects Champions (1975) #12-17, Iron Man Annual #4, Avengers #163, Super-Villain Team-Up #14 and Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #17-18.

Demon-gods, alien monsters and killer bees – it only goes to show that Angel, Iceman, Hercules, Black Widow and Ghost Rider did more before #17 than some teams get done by #50! The short-lived super-team squeezed multiple mayhem into mere months of masked marvelry! Featuring the Stranger and the Stilt-Man! Magneto and MODOK! The world reign of Doctor Doom! The Sentinels and the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants! Guest-starring Spider-Man and the Avengers! Plus: destined for the pages of Punisher War Journal…Rampage!

Champions Classic Vol. 2

Marvel Romance Redux: Another Kind Of Love

Written by Kyle J Baker, Peter David, Paul Di Filippo, Robert Loren Fleming, Keith Giffen, Roger Langridge, Joe R. Lansdale, Mike Leib, John Lustig, Jimmy Palmiotti, Jeff Parker, Kristen Sinclair, Fred Van Lente
Art by Sol Brodsky, John Buscema, Gene Colan, Vinnie Colletta, Dick Giordano, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, John Romita Jr.
Cover by Frank Cho
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Collects Marvel Romance Redux: But He Said He Loved Me!, I Should Have Been A Blonde, Love Is A Four-Letter Word, Restraining Orders Are For Other Girls And Guys & Dolls.

Continuing the noble pursuit of taking funny old pictures and putting funny words on top of them! We’ve asked some of the funniest writers in comics today to look at the romance comics of yesteryear and put in some new dialogue that’ll make us laugh! Unfortunately, the funniest writers were busy, so we had to settle on these guys. Hey, you get what you pay for.

Marvel Romance Redux: Another Kind Of Love

One Night With The Rebel Billionaire

Written by Trish Wylie
Art by Nayuna Sakurano
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Roane can’t help but feel excited as she discovers a naked man on the beach, his body chiseled like a statue’s. Under the silver moonlight, he catches her staring and teases her with a sinful and sexy smile. The next morning, she discovers that the mysterious man is Adam, a childhood friend who disappeared years ago. Roane’s nostalgic feelings of love for him soon come rushing back. But her sweet fantasy is destroyed when she discovers the real reason Adam has returned.

One Night With The Rebel Billionaire

A Place Of Storms

Written by Sara Craven
Art by Miyuki Yamaguchi
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“You must marry me, Andrea.” How could she feel anything but despair over this man’s proposal? Andrea was visiting Blaise at his imposing castle to convince him to break off his impulsive engagement to her cousin. But he managed to convince Andrea to be his bride in exchange. She tries to hate the cruel castle master who forced her into this contract marriage, but she begins to discover the pure heart behind his rough exterior…

A Place Of Storms

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 1

Written by, Brian Michael Bendis, Mark Millar, Brian K. Vaughan
Art by Mark Brooks, Steve Dillon, Jae Lee, Tom Raney
Cover by Bryan Hitch
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Collects Ultimate Fantastic Four Annual #1, Ultimate X-Men Annual #1, Ultimate Spider-Man Annual #1 And The Ultimates Annual #1.

The Ultimate Inhumans debut, two lives are forever changed, Ultimate Juggernaut returns, and everyone guest-stars in the first-ever Ultimate Annuals! In ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #1, it’s the first appearance of the Ultimate Inhumans! From a hidden race, she came to steal the heart of the FF’s youngest member: the beautiful elemental called Crystal! In ULTIMATE X-MEN ANNUAL #1, Juggernaut makes a play for the Gem of Cyttorak, the jewel that will make him truly unstoppable. Only two small things stand in his way: Rogue and Gambit, the new prince and princess of thieves! In ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #1, Spidey goes toe-to-toe with some old foes – and winds up with a new girlfriend! Who is she? Let’s just say she has a familiar face. And in THE ULTIMATES ANNUAL #1, if you thought the Ultimates were the only team S.H.I.E.L.D. was creating – you were wrong! Get ready for the next wave of super-soldiers designed to protect America’s vital interests. But is this all Director Nick Fury is up to, or is there much more to this ultra-clandestine program? And can even S.H.I.E.L.D. keep all these super-people under control?

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 1

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 2

Written by Brian Michael Bendis, Mike Carey, Charlie Huston, Robert Kirkman
Art by Mark Brooks, Mike Deodato Jr., Stuart Immonen, Frazer Irving, Salvador Larroca, Ryan Sook, Leinil Francis Yu
Cover by, Mike Deodato Jr
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Collects Ultimate Fantastic Four Annual #2, Ultimate X-Men Annual #2, Ultimate Spider-Man Annual #2 And The Ultimates Annual #2.

The Ultimate Annuals return with life-altering events! In ULTIMATE FANTASTIC FOUR ANNUAL #2, something strange has happened at Nursery Two, the Baxter Building’s Think Tank counterpart in Oregon. It’s disappeared, seemingly swallowed up by the earth itself! And if you think that heralds the return of the macabre Mole Man, go to the head of the class! In ULTIMATE X-MEN ANNUAL #2, Dazzler – Alison Blaire, former X-Man – has awakened from her coma only to discover her life is in deadly peril! And even her former fellow X-Men may be powerless to save her as a betrayal within the ranks has left them shell-shocked. In ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #2, Punisher and Daredevil return! While Foggy Nelson offers Spidey some legal advice, Police Captain Jean DeWolfe gives him some other advice – on how to take down the Ultimate Kangaroo! Will Peter Parker be able to navigate his way through this all-action moral maze, or will Punisher just shoot him instead? And in THE ULTIMATES ANNUAL #2, as the Ultimates clear the wreckage from the recent attack on the United States, a monstrous evil from the past rises from the ashes to launch an attack when America is at her weakest. And with the ranks of the Ultimates severely depleted, all that stands in the path of the long-thought-dead bio-fanatic Arnim Zola is the indomitable Sentinel of Liberty, Captain America, and Sam Wilson, the high-flying Falcon

Ultimate Annuals Vol. 2

Under The Brazilian Sun

Written by Catherine George
Art by Moe Fujisaki
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Catherine came to Portugal from England to inspect a painting. Roberto de Sousa, the man who requested her services, coldly dismisses her when he sees she’s a woman. Catherine’s determined to prove her worth to this former race car driver. But Roberto continues to avoid her, plagued by insecurities caused by the huge scar on his face from an accident. Yet his wild black curls and sexy gaze make Catherine feel as though her body is going to boil over. Scar and all, he is just too beautiful…

Under The Brazilian Sun

This site contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from these sites. Making purchases through these links helps support the site.

ComiXology Has 7 New Digital Comics For You Including More Classic Wolverine!

There’s seven new digital comics available for you right now! ComiXology has you covered with new comics from Marvel, Harlequin, and Seven Seas. See them all now or check out the individual issues below!

Ghost Rider Team-Up

Written by Tom DeFalco, Michael Fleisher, Steven Grant, Bill Mantlo, Jim Shooter
Art by Pat Broderick, Bob Hall, Don Perlin, Frank Robbins, Ron Wilson
Cover by Bob Budiansky
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Collects Marvel Team-Up #91, Marvel Two-In-One #80, Marvel Premiere #28, Avengers #214, And Ghost Rider (1973) #27 And #50.

The Spirit of Vengeance rides roughshod over Spider-Man, the Thing and the rest of the Marvel Universe! The Spider, the Ghost and the soul-stealer who hates them both – who will survive the Carnival of Fear? The Thing vs. the Ghost Rider in Death Race! Ghost Rider, Man-Thing, Morbius and Werewolf by Night – the Legion of Monsters – join forces for the most spine-tingling team-up of all in the mysterious Marvel manner! Hawkeye, the Two-Gun Kid and the Ghost Rider take on the menacing might of the Manticore! Earth’s Mightiest Heroes, the Avengers, embark on their most dangerous mission yet: capture the Ghost Rider! Plus: the Ghost Rider’s strangest adventure ever – featuring the Night Rider, Marvel’s first Ghost Rider!

Ghost Rider Team-Up

Simply Scandalous

Written by Carly Phillips
Art by Yuki Kuriya
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Catherine runs a catering business, and when she’s catering a big party for the famous Montgomery family, she feels a burning gaze on her. The man looking at her is Logan Montgomery, a successful attorney who’s a shoo-in to be the next mayor. Catherine has been wrongfully shamed by high society in the past, so she’s sworn she’ll never get involved with anyone from that world. However, she can’t fight the feelings she has for this man. She has no idea the dramatic change her life is about to go through after meeting Logan and his family.

Simply Scandalous

My Androgynous Boyfriend Vol. 2

Written by Tamekou
Art by Tamekou
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Meguru might be impossibly cute, but he’s not the only androgynous model around! Enter Sasame, another beautiful boy at Meguru’s talent agency. The world is in for some serious gender nonconforming magic when the two cross paths!

My Androgynous Boyfriend Vol. 2

Spider-Man/Black Cat: The Evil That Men Do

Written by Kevin Smith
Art by Terry Dodson
Cover by Terry Dodson
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Collects Spider-Man/Black Cat: Evil That Men Do #1-6.

The mysterious disappearance of an old friend brings Felicia Hardy, the Black Cat, to New York in search of answers – and a certain web-slinging ex-lover of hers is following the same trail. How long will it take before they do some…catching up?

Spider-Man/Black Cat: The Evil That Men Do

Stan Lee Meets

Written by Brian Michael Bendis, Paul Jenkins, Stan Lee, Jeph Loeb, Roy Thomas, Joss Whedon
Art by Mark Bagley, Mark Buckingham, Olivier Coipel, Alan Davis, Michael Gaydos, Scott Kolins, Salvador Larroca, Ed McGuinness, Lee Weeks, Mike Wieringo
Cover by Olivier Coipel
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Collects Stan Lee Meets Spider-Man, Dr. Strange, Dr. Doom, The Thing And Silver Surfer.

Celebrating the 65th anniversary of Stan Lee’s employment at Marvel Comics! In five astounding tales written by “The Man” himself, Stan meets his web-slinging creation, journeys to Greenwich Village to catch up with his old pal Doctor Strange, is abducted to Latveria by the sinister Doctor Doom, makes the mistake of bicycling past Yancy Street and surfs the stars with a certain silver-skinned space-farer! Plus: best-selling writers and artists pay homage to Stan’s life and career in five thrilling stories.

Stan Lee Meets

Wolverine Classic Vol. 4

Written by Archie Goodwin
Art by John Byrne
Cover by John Byrne
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Collects Wolverine (1988) #17-23.

Enemies like Roughouse are hard to find, as Wolverine learns all too well when his favorite Asgardian sparring partner gets abducted into a dictator’s experiment! But the trail leads the mutant marvel to more menace than he expected in the form of a Nazi cyborg, an amphibious evildoer and a giant germ of the gods! Featuring the X-Men, the Avengers and Daredevil!

Wolverine Classic Vol. 4

Wolverine Classic Vol. 5

Written by Peter David, Jo Duffy
Art by John Buscema, Gene Colan, Bill Jaaska, Klaus Janson, Barry Kitson
Cover by Jim Lee
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Collects Wolverine (1988) #24-30.

He’s the best there is at what he does…but what if he doesn’t remember how to do it? Investigation of an eerie agenda leaves Wolverine without even his altered memories, but could the loss of his old life be his only hope for peace? Plus, secrets of Wolverine’s past are revealed in Madripoor, Japan and an adventure in baby-sitting that hints at a stranger Wolverine origin than any seen before! Guest-starring the New Mutants!

Wolverine Classic Vol. 5

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ComiXology Delivers 7 New Digital Comics for You Today from Marvel and Harlequin

ComiXology has a mix of new and classic comics for you today in their digital store. Get digital comics from Marvel and Harlequin. Check them all out here or the individual issues below.

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 1

Written by Ernie Hart, Stan Lee, Larry Lieber
Art by Dick Ayers, Don Heck, Jack Kirby, Larry Lieber
Cover by Richard Isanove, Jack Kirby
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Collects material from Tales To Astonish (1959) #27 and #35-52.

Burned under the magnifying glass of overwhelming demand, Mighty Marvel has given in to bring you our smallest hero in his first big Masterwork! Scientist Hank Pym invented an amazing growth serum and a cybernetic helmet, making him the Astonishing Ant-Man! Teamed with the winsome Wasp, the tiny twosome battle a sensational array of mini- and maxi-sized menaces from the Scarlet Beetle to the Black Knight! And if that’s not enough to occupy a man of science, he’s also defending the good ol’ U.S. of A.’s secrets from the Commie hordes! But we’ve got more than just miniature mayhem for you, True Believer — you can also look forward to the birth of the biggest Avenger there ever was: Giant-Man!

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 1

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 2

Written by Al Hartley, Leon Lazarus, Stan Lee, Larry Lieber
Art by Dick Ayers, Carl Burgos, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, Larry Lieber, Bob Powell
Cover by Jack Kirby
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Collects material from Tales To Astonish #53-69.

Hank Pym and his ladylove, Janet Van Dyne, make their highly requested return to the Marvel Masterworks in the concluding volume of Ant-Man/Giant-Man’s Silver Age adventures! Penned by no less than “The Man” himself, Stan Lee, and illustrated by an unmatched cadre of Bullpen embellishers from “Dazzling” Dick Ayers and “Sturdy” Steve Ditko to Golden Age greats Carl Burgos and Bob Powell, you’ll need high pockets to hold onto the action and adventure that’s in store for you. Giant-Man and the winsome Wasp have the decks stacked against them as they go up against an array of antagonists from the wild and weird Human Top, Porcupine, Colossus and the Wrecker to the Incredible Hulk, Attuma and Spider-Man! Also presenting the debut of the world’s tallest Avenger’s new look and the Wasp’s own solo feature!

Marvel Masterworks: Ant-Man/Giant-Man Vol. 2

Avengers Epic Collection: This Beachhead Earth

Written by Harlan Ellison, Roy Thomas
Art by Neal Adams, John Buscema, Sal Buscema, Frank Giacoia, Sam Grainger, Herb Trimpe
Cover by John Buscema
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Collects Avengers (1963) #77-97; Incredible Hulk (1968) #140.

Roy Thomas’ epic run continues with the origin of the Black Panther, the debut of the Lady Liberators, the return of the Squadron Sinister and the all-time classic Kree/Skrull War! Caught in a cosmic crossfire, Earth has become the staging ground for a conflict of star-spanning proportions! Two eternal intergalactic enemies — the merciless Kree and the shape-shifting Skrulls — have gone to war, and our planet is situated on the front lines! Can Earth’s Mightiest Heroes bring about an end to the fighting before humanity becomes a casualty of war? And what good are even a dozen super-powered champions against the vast military machines of two of the greatest empires in the cosmos?

Avengers Epic Collection: This Beachhead Earth

Britannia All At Sea

Written by Betty Neels
Art by Kuremi Hazama
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Head nurse Britannia finds herself strangely attracted to the stone-faced and stoic visiting professor Jake Luitingh van Thien.

Getting a glimpse into his softer side, Britannia takes him up on his offer to visit his hometown in Holland to find love…

Britannia All At Sea

Marvel Adventures Iron Man Vol. 3: Hero By Design

Written by Fred Van Lente
Art by Scott Koblish, Graham Nolan
Cover by Francis Tsai
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Collects Marvel Adventures Iron Man #9-12.

The Armored Avenger blasts through the third arc of his solo title in the critically acclaimed, best-selling Marvel Adventures line! Featuring an army of gray Iron Man armor automatons; the Chameleon; the spectacular Spider-Woman; the Living Laser; Canada’s greatest super heroes, Alpha Flight; Kiber the Cruel; and the return of Tony Stark’s missing father!

Marvel Adventures Iron Man Vol. 3: Hero By Design

Marvel Fanfare: Strange Tales

Written by Mike W. Barr, Charlie Boatner, Chris Claremont, Steven Grant, David Anthony Kraft, Bill Mantlo, Roger McKenzie, David Michelinie, Sandy Plunkett, Roger Stern, David Winn
Art by Joe Barney, Dave Cockrum, George Freeman, Michael Golden, Luke McDonnell, Sandy Plunkett, Marshall Rogers, P. Craig Russell, Paul Smith, Charles Vess, Trevor Von Eeden
Cover by Michael Golden
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Collects Marvel Fanfare #1-7.

One of Marvel’s most unique anthology titles had a strong start with a classic Spider-Man/X-Men team-up saga in the Savage Land, presented here in its entirety, with more than a half-dozen additional tales! Mister Fantastic, alone against Annihilus! Captain America faces a forgotten wartime legacy! The Hulk vs. the circus! Christmas with Daredevil! Deathlok, Hawkeye, Iron Man, Ian McNee of MYSTIC ARCANA fame and more!

Marvel Fanfare: Strange Tales

Marvel Illustrated: The Last Of The Mohicans

Written by Roy Thomas
Art by Steve Kurth, Denis Medri
Cover by John Watson
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Collects Marvel Illustrated: Last Of The Mohicans #1-6.

The first great hero in American fiction—in the first true American epic! Across the Eastern Wilderness rages the French and Indian War—with only a handful of English and Colonial troops standing in the path of the relentless army of General Montcalm and his fierce Iroquois allies. But arrayed against the invaders are Hawkeye, the fabled frontier scout, and his noble friends Chingachgook and Uncas, the only two survivors of the Mohican tribe. THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS is a tale of bravery and barbarism — of heroism amid the horrors of the final great war fought between the British and the French — and their Indian allies — for a land destined one day to seize its freedom in its own hands. James Fenimore Cooper’s famous novel has been adapted with all its legendary excitement intact by award-winning writer Roy Thomas, and artists Steven Kurth and Denis Medri.

Marvel Illustrated: The Last Of The Mohicans

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Discover Frank Miller’s Daredevil With this Digital Sale – 67% Off

Between 1979 and 1983, two of the comic book industry’s biggest legends, writer/artist Frank Miller and artist Klaus Janson, joined forces on Daredevil, redefining the character and creating one of the most acclaimed comic book runs of all time. Now is your chance to witness this landmark run for yourself with the Daredevil by Frank Miller SaleDaredevil by Frank Miller and Klaus Janson Vol. 1, 2, and 3, three collections containing the entirety of the pair’s collaboration on the character are on sale now through 4/23 11PM ET.

These must-have volumes for any comic book fan include Daredevil #158-161, Daredevil #163-191, Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man #27-28, Daredevil: Love & War, and What If? #28.

Frank Miller and Klaus Janson’s transformative work on the title elevated Daredevil into the recognizable Marvel icon he is today and cemented their place as two of the most acclaimed creators in comic book history. This seminal run introduced the beautiful and deadly assassin Elektra who went on to become one of Marvel’s leading female characters. Miller and Janson also established criminal mastermind Kingpin and mad marksman Bullseye as Daredevil’s greatest foes. The creator’s bold storytelling choices and dark depiction of Hell’s Kitchen make their take on the Man Without Fear one of the more influential comic book runs of all time and went on to inspire the hit Marvel’s Daredevil television series. The classic issues contained in these collections feature other industry greats such as writers Bill Mantlo, Roger McKenzie, David Micheline, Marv Wolfman, and Mike W. Barr as well as artists John Buscema and Bill Sienkiewicz.

Daredevil Frank Miller Sale

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Michael Golden’s Micronauts Artist’s Edition Celebrates the Masterful Illustration of Miniature Heroes

In June, IDW Publishing will release the latest addition to its multiple Eisner Award-winning AE line with Michael Golden’s Micronauts Artist’s Edition.

Over 40 years ago, Marvel debuted the influential Micronauts comic book series, licensed at the time from the Mego Corporation (the Micronauts brand has since been acquired by Hasbro). The original series quickly amassed a hardcore fan following, one that survives decades later thanks to the mesmerizing narrative by Bill Mantlo and otherworldly illustration of Michael Golden and fellow artists.

Out of print for 35 years, six complete issues of Micronauts (#3, #7-9, and #11-12) will be collected in the 184-page Artist’s Edition, alongside a gallery section of more than a dozen covers, art rarities from the era, and additional pages that represent some of Michael Golden’s very best from the Micronauts series. This gorgeous hardcover measures 12” x 17”.

As with all Artist’s Editions, nearly every gorgeous plate will be reproduced from scans of the original art and printed at the same size they were drawn, with all the distinctive creative nuances that make original art unique – a perfect representation of the work in its original form.

IDW will donate a portion of profits to the long-term medical care of Bill Mantlo, who has received treatment for cognitive and memory impairment since a 1992 hit-and-run accident.

Michael Golden’s Micronauts Artist’s Edition
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