Tag Archives: andres mossa

Review: Marvel Tales Featuring: Black Widow

Marvel continues to celebrate 80 years with the latest Marvel Tales, this one featuring Black Widow!

Marvel Tales Featuring Black Widow features Mystic Comics #4, Tales of Suspense #52, Amazing Spider-Man #86, Amazing Adventures #1, Marvel Fanfare #10, and Red Widow: First Strike by George Kapitan, Harry Sahle, Stan Lee, Don Rico, Don Heck, Sam Rosen, John Romita, Jim Mooney, Gary Friedrich, John Buscema, John Verpoorten, Art Simek, Ralph Macchio, George Perez, Brett Breeding, Petra Scotese, Tom Orzechowski, Margaret Stohl, Nico Leon, Andres Mossa, and Travis Lanham.

Get your copy in comic shops today! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Old Man Quill #1

We’ve seen Old Man Logan and Old Man Hawkeye and now… Old Man Quill! What’s Star-Lord up to in this future timeline? Find Out!

Old Man Quill #1 is by Ethan Sacks, Robert Gill, Andres Mossa, and Joe Caramagna.

Get your copy in comic shops February 6! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: War is Hell #1

War is Hell #1

In honor of Marvel’s 80th Anniversary and history with War Comics comes a brand new edition of War is Hell with two fascinating and soul-crushing tales of War. “In the Mood” by Howard Chaykin takes you to the skies as the Luftwaffe and RAF battle over the English Channel for a battle tale of bitter irony and “War Glammer” by Phillip Kennedy Johnson brings you back to Earth in modern day Afghanistan with a story that will chill you to the bone.

War Is Hell #1 is a comic of two stories – quite literally. Paying homage to the publisher’s roots, we get two separate and distinct stories decry the horrors of war. The second is far more brutal than the first, and is set up as a narration over imagery as a group of US soldier embark on a raid in Afghanistan. The story, War Glammer is written by Phillip Kennedy Johnson and features art by Alberto Alburquerque with colours by Andres Mossa. It’s easily the darker of the two in terms of subject matter and the visuals used – which are really quite solid – and doesn’t try to gloss over the soldier’s experience.

Look, I need to be utterly clear here: I am not, nor have I ever been, a member of the armed forces. I genuinely don’t know what war is like beyond news reports and stories online, so while this story fills my impression of war, my impression could be very, very wrong.

That said, War Glammer is a good story, fully contained with a powerful impact on the reader (especially upon the second read through).

Howard Chaykin’s story, In The Mood takes place over several years in the Second World War and follows a German fighter pilot who disagrees with the Nazi philosophy, but takes pride in serving his country (“Germany, not Nazi-Germany”) well. This short story feels very much like the older stories that this book is paying homage too, both in setting and the content of the story. In The Mood is much lighter than the follow up, again both visually and in subject matter, but leaves no less an impact upon the reader as the story reminds us that our actions have consequences.

War Is Hell #1 is a really interesting comic, and the dual story nature of it forces both writers to trim the chaff – neither is forced to extend their stories to fill the space within, and the comic is stronger for it. If you’re interested in a couple of really good short stories, then this is worth picking up; I was going to recommend this when I assumed it was $6, but after a quick fact check, it’s only $4.

Story: Howard Chaykin and Phillip Kennedy Johnson
Artist: Howard Chaykin and Alberto Alburquerque
Colourist: Edgar Delgardo and Andres Mossa Letterer: Ken Bruzenak Story: 7.9 Art: 8.3 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Read.

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Edge of Spider-Geddon

Spider-Geddon is coming but before that event get to know Spider-people from around the multiverse in this trade paperback collecting the four issue series and Superior Octopus #1.

Edge of Spider-Geddon is by Jed McKay, Lonnie Nadler, Zac Thompson, Gerard Way, Jason Latour, Aaron Kuder, Christos Gage, Gerardo Sandoval, Alberto Alburquerque, Tonci Zonjic, Will Robson, Mike Hawthorne, Mark Bagley, Brahm Revel, Craig Yeung, Wade Von Grawbadger, Brian Reber, Triona Farrell, Ian Herring, Andres Mossa, Jordie Bellaire, and Dono Sanchez-Almara.

Get your copy in comic shops now and in book stores January 15th! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Man Without Fear #1

Man Without Fear #1

Daredevil is gone, but Hell’s Kitchen is still a place of heroes and villains. Foggy Nelson (issue #1), the Defenders (issue #2), the many loves of Matt Murdock (issue #3), the Kingpin (issue #4) and a mysterious Guardian Devil (issue #5) will all learn what it means to live in a world without a Daredevil. And without a Daredevil to protect it, has hell come for his city? Who is The Man Without Fear?!

Daredevil is beaten and broken, laying in a coma. The abuse from over the years and his latest battle have taken its toll leaving his future in doubt. What impact does that have on the area he protected? What does it mean to his friends? Man Without Fear #1 begins to explore this with a focus on Matt Murdock’s best friend, Foggy Nelson.

Writer Jed MacKay delivers a solid first issue that has Foggy reflecting on his friendship and history with Matt and Daredevil while at the same time having Matt explore his life. Within his coma he’s battling his demons, literally and figuratively.

It’s nothing new and groundbreaking in framing or storytelling but it’s a touching issue. Its focus and emphasis on the friendship, and heartache that has come with it, is a solid beginning to the series. It also leaves open some questions as to whether it really will be Matt returning to his previous role as Daredevil.

The art by Danilo S. Beyruth with color by Andres Mossa and lettering by Clayton Cowles is interesting. Beyruth’s art style doesn’t stand out as something I remember from elsewhere but here its haunting touches make the story stand out. It’s a good mix of art to the tone of the story. There’s some nice touches here and there emphasizing the nightmarish experience Matt is having while in a coma and there’s a good focus on Daredevil’s history even if it’s just in the background.

While there’s nothing particularly wrong with Man Without Fear #1, the first issue feels like it might benefit from reading the entire series in trade form at once. This is one for the hardcore Daredevil fans right now but might be a solid read once it’s all wrapped up.

Story: Jed MacKay Art: Danilo S. Beyruth
Color: Andres Mossa Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a Free copy for review

Review: Star Wars Vol. 9 Hope Dies

A secret rebel base. A secret rebel fleet. A chance of victory… but now, Darth Vader has found it. There is no escape.

Star Wars Vol. 9 Hope Dies features issues #50-55 and Star Wars Annual #4 by Kieron Gillen, Cullen Bunn, Salvador Larroca, Ario Anindito, Roland Boschi, Marc Laming, Guru-eFX, Jordan Boyd, and Andres Mossa.

Get your copy in comic shops now and book stores December 24! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon/comiXology/Kindle
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with FREE copies for review
This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you click on one of the product links and make a purchase, we’ll receive a percentage of the sale. Graphic Policy does purchase items from this site. Making purchases through these links helps support the site

Review: Vault of Spiders #1

Only a Spider-Army can stop the end of the Multiverse! Meet Web-Slinger, the Spider-Man from the Wild West,. He is the Emissary from Hell, he is SUPAIDAMAN! The Spider-Man from the live-action Spider-Man show that aired in Japan in the 1970s is back. And that’s just a glimpse into the Vault of Spiders!

One of the fun things about the Spider-Man multiverse events is that they’ve delivered utterly insane Spider-Man concepts and allowed Marvel, and creators, to explore their multiverse in a controlled way. Things still have to be Spider focused but they can be a little out there. That has made those events a lot of fun and entertaining. So, I was looking forward to Vault of Spiders #1, a spin-off of the excellent Spider-Geddon and walked away, a little bummed.

Vault of Spiders #1 is an anthology so the quality of stories and art is all over the place. Some are good and others head scratching. What’s good about this issue is there really are great concepts. All are great concepts. The executions though, some were a bit lacking.

Spider-Byte and Savage Spider-Man stand out from the four stories. The first stands out for the concept and creativity, and solid costume design, while the latter due to its fantastic art and twist at the end. Both are entertaining and deliver something a little different.

The Web-Slinger, a western set story, and Final Galaxy Battle!, the Japanese take on Spider-Man each have their charms but also stumble. The western aspect is played up a lot and in some ways entertaining but with the story relying on a twist of a character as far as the bad guy, there’s a shrug of the shoulders where a reveal should shock readers. A connection there is missing. The Japanese Spider-Man, while the art is fantastic reminding me of classic manga, the story is headscratching in every way. It makes no sense. That’s part of the point, I think, but when everything else in the comic winks and nods as to their roots (Savage is straight up Tarzan), this one maybe goes a bit too far.

Vault of Spiders #1 is a bit of a let down but fun to see the various versions of Spider-Man. I’d love to see this as an ongoing with longer stories, the brevity was a hindrance. Like a lot of anthologies, there’s some good here and some bad but if you’re a Spider fan it might be worth checking out.

Prologue
Story: Jed MacKay Art/Ink: Scott Koblish
Color: Andres Mossa Lettering: VC’s Travis Lanham

The Web-Slinger
Story: Cullen Bunn Art: Javier Pulido
Color: Muntsa Vicente Lettering: VC’s Joe Caramagna

Final Galaxy Battle!
Story: Jed MacKay Art/Ink/Lettering: Sheldon Vella

Spider-Byte
Story: Nilah Magruder Art/Ink: Alberto Alburquerque
Color: Andrew Crossley Letterer: VC’s Travis Lanham

Story: 7.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 7.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy fore review

Review: Edge of Spider-Geddon #4

Science-Industrialist Norman Osborn’s life changed when a radioactive spider bit him. With young scientist Peter Parker working for his company, Norman became a very different Spider-Man and changed the world. Now, however, Norman’s son Harry is seen wearing a green armor suit and threatening everything Norman has built!

Edge of Spider-Geddon has been a series of one-shots introducing us to the various Spider-Men that will be at the center of Spider-Geddon. Up to this point, the issues have been top notch. I’ve wanted each to get their own series. This final issue is a bit of a miss.

Writer Aaron Kuder delivers a Spider-Man that’s a villain. Norman Osborn is Spider-Man in this world. He’s been twisted and warped. How? Why? We don’t really know. While we got a bit of a background on other Spider-Men, this one is an enigma. We get the conflict but not much of a set up. Due to that, it falls a bit flat.

Kuder is joined on art by Will Robson, inks by Craig Yueng and Robson, colors by Andres Mossa, and lettering by Cory Petit. Much like the story, the art is just ok. There’s nothing particularly bad about it but there’s also nothing too inspired. Where opportunities to do something visually interesting, simple solutions are taken. Designs aren’t pushed far enough. The limited amount of characters are forgettable and replaceable. Other issues have had some fantastic art with great detail, here, things just are there.

The issue seems like it’ll be a key one adding an x-factor into what comes next. But that’s its biggest issue. The creative team had some goals and just got there. There isn’t a lead up worthy of what should be a menacing Spider-Man. It’s overall a bit uninspired which is a shame as the subject has so much potential.

Story: Aaron Kuder Art: Aaron Kuder, Will Robson
Ink: Craig Yueng, Will Robson Color: Andres Mossa Letters: VC’s Cory Petit
Story: 6.0 Art: 6.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Lando: Double Or Nothing #1

Lando Calrissian is a smooth talking, cape wearing con man with impeccable fashion sense and maybe too much weakness for gambling. He was also recently played by Donald Glover in Solo: A Star Wars Storyand the younger version of the character is the star of the miniseries Lando: Double or Nothing #1 from Rodney Barnes, Paolo Villanelli, and Andres Mossa. The story is an extended negotiation between Lando, who just wants some extra credits to turn the Millennium Falcon into a space casino, and Kristiss, who wants him to use his vaunted smuggling abilities to help her people, the Petrusians, rebel against the Empire. She promises him to pay him too because Lando isn’t super altruistic.

On a pure craft level, Lando #1 is a success. Barnes sharply recreates the voices of both Lando and his socially conscious, snarky droid co-pilot L3, and Villanelli is at ease drawing Lando’s smile and body language as he comes to grips with Kristiss’ offer and tries to play it cool. Likewise, Villanelli is also in his element depicting highly rendered space battles and chase because, of course, the Falcon runs into some Imperial TIE Fighters pretty early on. His style is a happy medium between the cartooning of IDW’s Star Wars Adventures and the photorealism (And possibly tracing.) of Salvador Larroca’s work on Darth Vader and Star Wars. To complete the visual package, Mossa lays down a smooth color palette to show the bright light of the club, the classy interior of the Falcon, and energy coursing through space when Lando and company go on the run.

Lando #1 trades celibate, imperialist mysticism and trade disputes for flirting, fast spaceships, and cluttered interior spaces. Sure, this is a first issue so Rodney Barnes has to quickly get readers up to snuff on the whole Perusian situation via exposition, but Kristiss isn’t a helpless innocent and plays Lando at his game plying him with drinks, deals involving money, and maybe even a kiss. They have pretty decent chemistry, and Barnes mines a lot of humor from L3 commenting on Lando trying to be a smooth operator with a pop of yellow shirt. Whenever Lando thinks he’s legendary or has some general sense of swagger, she is there to cut him down to size with a sharp remark. Humor is really the engine that keeps this comic running at this point.

Lando: Double or Nothing #1 is a great comic to pick up after watching Solo and (and hopefully) wishing that maybe Lando and L3 deserved a little more screen time. Paolo Villanelli and Andres Mossa turn in a spectacular chase sequence, and hopefully, they and Rodney Barnes can continue to add some fun wrinkles to the opportunism versus altruism conflict that has defined Lando as a character since he mispronounced Han Solo’s name for the first time back in 1980.

Story: Rodney Barnes Art: Paolo Villanelli Colors: Andres Mossa Letters: Joe Caramagna
Story: 7.8 Art: 8.2 Overall: 8 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Old Man Hawkeye #4

Old Man Hawkeye #4

Story: Ethan Sacks
Art: Marco Checchetto
Color: Andres Mossa
Letterer: VC’s Joe Caramagna
Cover: Marco Checchetto
Logo Design: Adam Del Re
Graphic Desgins: Anthony Gambino
Editor: Mark Basso
Parental Advisory
In Shops: Apr 25, 2018
SRP: $3.99

AN EYE FOR AN EYE Part 4
• HAWKEYE sets his sights on ABE JENKINS, formerly known as THE BEETLE!
• But as Hawkeye’s sight deteriorates, and his re-emergence gains attention…how long will he be able to shake the TWO tails he’s picked up across the Wastelands?
• The adventure heats up with a throwdown between two former Thunderbolts…and a surprise ambush you won’t see coming!

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