Tag Archives: albert de guzman

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #18

Green Lantern Mosaic #18

Sometimes the fork in the road is the best thing that could happen to us. When we find ourselves at a place where we cannot go forward or stall we then look for a better way. Sometimes that means moving to a new place, hoping it brings good fortune as well. Then there are those times we find a relationship that may be dragging us down, leading one to cut ties with people who are considered emotional vampires.

Those around may know us better than we know ourselves but this isn’t always the case. As you get older, you’ll find that people older than you give you unsolicited advice and sometimes it’s from people who you consider close. This is when your ability to discern comes into play. In the last issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon’s powers have grown more than the rest of the Corps could anticipate as he gets into the battle of his life.

We find Jon shortly after the Amazon Hellburner eviscerated everyone he loves in the Mosaic. He becomes focused and rebuilds the Mosaic by hand, unleashing a new power and role, as he has gained the abilities to join the ranks of the Guardians. He uses his newfound abilities to restore the Mosaic to balance, even getting rid of some evildoers in the process.  By the issue’s end, he finds a way for all inhabitants of the Mosaic to live harmoniously, definitively ending his tenure as Protector of the Mosaic.

Overall, an issue that ends the story as wild and serene as the story has always been. The story by writer Gerard Jones is great and infinite. The art by the creative team is astounding. Altogether, an issue that gives readers a satisfying conclusion.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #17

Green Lantern Mosaic #17

What happens when it seems as though everything you built, has gone to waste? Have you ever been in a situation where you felt it was a wasted effort? Some people may feel this in romantic relationships, where one person is more serious about the relationship than the other. Others may feel this in their professional career as if their lives stalled if they don’t get to a certain milestone by a certain age.

This is where one finds that purpose or that reason for going forward. This tests your resolve and why you are where you are. All we have is our fortitude and our reason for living. In the 17th issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon’s perfect picture of the Mosaic is crumbling, and he’s doing everything to keep it intact despite the efforts of the aliens and the Green Lantern Corps.

We find Jon reunited with Katma Tui, a brief bright moment as the rest of the Green Lantern Corps looks to dismantle what Jon has built within the Mosaic. Soon each of the Justice Leaguers that came with the Green Lantern Corps finds out just how complex a world Jon created and how arduous it is to manage. Hal’s frustration leads to a boiling point, leading him to seek the direction of the Guardians. By the issue’s end,  one of the races in the Mosaic looks to carry out a genocide that will see every race decimated.

Overall, an issue that puts the complete story in perspective. The story by Gerard Jones is impactful and vast. The art by the creative team is astonishing. Altogether, an issue that shows the reader just how complex a world builder Johns was already, all those years ago.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #16

Green Lantern Mosaic #16

When should you ask for help?  Everyone is different when they look to ask for the help they require. For some, it’s when they can’t figure something out right away. They want an answer but nothing possessing the knowledge to move forward. Then there are those who have something to prove but would rather drown than ask for help. Both of these situations prove that most don’t know that they are in trouble.

Sometimes, it takes our friends and family to step up and step in. We sometimes can’t see when we need help. It usually is more difficult for superheroes, especially when saving the world is at the center of their actions. In the 16th issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, Jon looks to his super-powered friends to confront the mounting issues in the Mosaic world.

We stumble upon the Mosaic World, as it is under attack, and not from your usual villains, it just so happens to be Hal Jordan and some of the Justice League, looking to make their presence known. As we soon find out just how Jon came to the Mosaic World in the first place, and how his steadfast valiance is what attracted Rose to him in the first place. We also see how the events of Mosaic have become too much for Jon, as Hal and Guy and Gardner return to end all the chaos, but not without causing a bit of trouble themselves. By the issue’s end, as Jon regains his faculties, some things have shifted back, as his dead wife, Katma Tui, is alive and well now.

Overall, one of the best issues ever. The story by Gerard Jones is unassailable and infinite. The art by the creative team is extraordinary. Altogether, an issue that shows how great a storyteller Jones is.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #15

Green Lantern Mosaic #15

In our world, the taking of human life is incomparable. To commit the act is a crime for a reason. It’s borne of ill will most of the time. Sometimes it’s accidental, and at times involuntarily. Then there are times when the person absolutely has no choice because of circumstance.

When you have no choice it may be as well be a matter of life or death. It’s either you or the other person. Being in the military, I’ve seen this scenario play out too many times where you may have a moment of being utterly frozen or your training kicks in. It’s rare when we have to reckon with these split-second decisions. When we do, it is usually hell to pay. In Green Lantern Mosaic #15, Jon has this very dilemma in front of him, with the guidance of Ch’p.

We find Jon trying to get his bearings, when old Timer shows up, to carry him to his own personal hell known as Xanshi. He literally confronts those he has killed throughout his life. Each person is more difficult to deal with, and he has to even confront his Grandpa Roy. These confrontations cause him to self reflect, making him question why he has sustained the Mosaic world as log ash e has. By issue’s end, his most devastating reckoning just so happens to be his wife, Katma, leaving him, unfettered.

Overall, one of the best issues of the series, leaving fans to see how human Jon is as he deals with past foes. The story by Gerard Jones is commanding and vast. The art by the creative team is remarkable. Altogether, an issue which reinforces why the fanfare fro this book remains almost thirty years later

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern Mosaic #14

Green Lantern Mosaic #14

There’s not too many movies that induce paranoia like Invasion of the Body Snatchers. It tapped into our worst fears of mind control and total immersion into society. Marvel took the idea and unleashed it into their comic universe through the Skrull Invasion. This, of course, was pushed into their Cinematic Universe in Captain Marvel and Spiderman: Homecoming, showing a world where you need to question if someone really is who they say they are.

The movie’s story infused the idea that our worst fears can be realized at any moment and we would be powerless towards it. The movie has had several remakes and remixes, and every time the story at the center of it is still so relevant. As interesting as the Skrulls are at Marvel, I always wondered how it would be if an actual superhero were mind-controlled. In Green Lantern Mosaic #14, this scary idea plays out.

We find John enjoying the world he built on Mosaic but still feels incomplete. It’s a situation he doesn’t know how to overcome. Before he can settle into his sublime, the UberMenschen, controlled by the Peeper attack the Mosaic and take control of his body through the use of Pods. These very pods start to take control of different inhabitants slowly becoming the dominant force within the Mosaic World.

Overall, a crazy trip of an issue in this series, one which will make the reader re-read to see what a rabbit hole writer Gerard Jones leads us into. The story by Jones is powerful and immense. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, a story that will have fans of this book even more enamored.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Luke McDonnell, Steve Mattson,
and Robert Campanella
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern: Mosaic #6

Green Lantern: Mosaic #6

As a fan of Star Trek, I have always been fascinated with how deftly Gene Roddenberry used his art form as a platform. He often left fans of the show pondering things beyond the surface entertainment. There’s a reason so many people have shown their devotion to the franchise. For good reason. The show pushed its viewers when other shows were just mindless entertainment. It often made their audience peer into their hearts and minds and subscribed to the concept that each person must do better for all of humanity.

Every franchise that came out in the 1990s made the band even stronger. As my favorites were Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: The Next Generation. Both shows gave fans a deeper look into this universe. One of the best stories to come from Roddenberry’s mind was from the original series, “Arena.” It gave viewers a battle of brute and smarts while asking what’s the reason for the fight in the first place. In a fight similar to Kirk and Gorn, we have a fight between two Lanterns, both of equal skill in the sixth issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic.

We find John as he meditates only to be interrupted by Kilowog. Kilowag has brought his recruits, Kreon and Boodikka, to train with him on Mosaic. He starts by doing a quick mind scan showing their elevated disgust for each other. As he utilizes their worst fears, and turns it against them, only for them to work together. By issue’s end, John has gotten these two to work together, proving to Kilowog, that sometimes pushing beyond their limits, is the only way you know where they truly lie.

Overall, this issue adds a layer of depth to this book. The story by Gerard Jones is reflective, intellectual, and expertly plotted. The art by the creative team is stunning. Altogether, an issue that will make readers see just how powerful this book truly is.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Dan Panosian, Steve Mattsson,
and Cully Hamner
Story: 10 Art: 9.8 Overall: 9.8 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern: Mosaic #5

Green Lantern: Mosaic #5

One of my favorite movies of the 1980s is Inner Space. It was the first time I was introduced to both Meg Ryan and Dennis Quaid. I was well aware of who Martin Short was, thanks to his hilarious Saturday morning show, The Completely Mental Misadventures of Ed Grimley and before that when he created the same character on SCTV. The movie was one of Joe Dante’s most mainstream forays and definitely one of his funniest efforts to this day.

The movie starred Quaid as a military pilot who volunteers for a miniaturization experiment. Through a series of events gets into Short’s character which leads to him hearing Quaid all the time. He eventually seeks out Quaid’s girlfriend, Ryan’s character, to uncover the plot to steal the technology. As the best part of the movie was the many funny conversations between Quaid and Short. In a twisted version of that movie, we find John and Hal fighting it out in a mind war in the fifth issue of Green Lantern Mosaic.

We find Hal visiting John and Rose. His main purpose for coming to Mosaic is to bring Rose back with him, something that doesn’t sit well with either men. Hal uses his considerable skills to overpower John and probe his mind and brings up many of his regrets, from the lives he lost. Just when Hal thinks he’s got John down and out, he purports a gambit of his various personas, one that outmatches Hal. By issue’s end, John has beaten Hal, knowing that there is more to a fight than victory.

Overall, this issue exemplifies why years after its publication, people love this book. The story by Gerard Jones is introspective, intelligent, and expertly plotted. The art by the creative team deserves to be in any museum. Altogether, an issue that will have comic book fans want to see more introspective issues like these.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Dan Panosian, Steve Mattson, and Cully Hamner
Story: 10 Art: 9.7 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern: Mosaic #3

Green Lantern: Mosaic #3

What happens when someone else’s problem becomes yours? The first thing that runs through people’s minds, is how did they let this happen? We all think we are doing the right thing despite our best intentions.

In the third issue of Green Lantern: Mosaic, John defends the Mosaic world against Sinestro.

We find John as he tries to balance his personal life with the stresses of defending the Mosaic world as it becomes almost unbearable.  Just when he leaves his guard down an evil force has snuck into this world, Sinestro, who tries to manipulate John’s mind. Sinestro uses John’s memories and those he cherishes most, like his girlfriend Rose, to trick him into giving up his power. By issue’s end, he defeats Sinestro but becomes even more aware of the threats looking to unravel this world he protects.

Overall, an engaging installment in this epic series that serves as both an escape for the reader and a tool for retrospection. The story by Gerard Jones is brilliant and action packed. The art by the creative team is alluring. Altogether, a story that is absolutely moving.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Cully Hamner,
and Dan Panosian
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern: Mosaic #2

Green Lantern: Mosaic #2

If you ever had a friend die unexpectedly it hits you like a ton of bricks. I’ve had a few friends from my childhood and my time in the military die. Some we saw coming, others came unexpected. I was recently reminded by one of my friends on Facebook why we’re having a reunion this June as she posted a picture of the classmates we lost.  It was quite sobering to know that they were gone.

My first reaction when I saw their pictures, was to the last memory I had of each of them. I wasn’t close to all of them but two of them I was. Nothing is ever as good as you remembered it which is what makes memories so sweet. In the second issue of Green Lantern Mosaic, John loses a friend who visits. It’s a loss which only fuels his focus in stopping this evil.

We find John having nightmares of his friend, Ch’p, as lately he has been restless dreaming about the road that runs through Mosaic World. We also find Ch’p struggling with who he is and his role in the Green Lantern Corps, as he visits John, to see how his old friend is doing, and how he has kept all these different societies living peaceful together. As Ch’p travels this alternate reality, he discovers an uncomfortable truth and the reason behind John’s nightmares.

Overall, an interesting exploration of both characters, one which delve deeper into how complicated their lives are. The story by Gerard Jones is smart and creative. The art by the creative team is simple yet elegant. Altogether, a story which ends with more questions which propels this story forward.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Albert De Guzman, Dan Panosian, Cully Hamner
and Steve Mattsson
Story: 9.7 Art: 9.4 Overall: 9.5 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Green Lantern: Mosaic #1

Green Lantern: Mosaic #1

When it comes to comics, the big two usually makes carbon copies of each other’s characters with slight tweaking. Look at the actual names of Deadpool and Deathstroke, two characters who are universally loved by everyone who follows them. They both have the same occupation but their personalities are where the differences begin to splinter. Eventually, comic fans make their own mind up on which version is superior.

Another such “coincidence” is the Green Lantern Corps and the Nova Corps. Both are galactic space forces ensuring the safety of the universe. I never quite caught on to the allure of the Nova Corps but definitely loved the Green Lantern Corps and the various men and women who wielded the Lantern Ring. One of my favorite Green Lanterns is John Stewart, a daunting hero in his own right and one which I wished had his own book. Fortunately, he did have a series back in 1992, Green Lantern: Mosaic.

We find John Stewart as he introduces the reader to the wonders of the Mosaic world, where everything is and is not what it seems. As John protects this world, he is also very much part of it, as he reveals that his also an alien within these confines. As we find out a bit of history behind the character and the struggles he endured while on Earth. By issue’s end, this new world of his own making is more than he could ever have dreamt of.

Overall, a fascinating almost psychotropic trip that both the reader and the character go on to understand what we have stepped into. The story by Gerard Jones is enigmatic and captivating. The art by the creative team is alluring. Altogether, an excellent story which feels like Star Trek with superheroes.

Story: Gerard Jones
Art: Brian Stelfreeze, Albert De Guzman, Cully Hamner, Dan Panosian, and Steve Mattson
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.0 Overall: 9.0 Recommendation: Buy