Tag Archives: Al Feldstein

The Complete Junior and Sunny Catches Eyes This December

The Complete Junior And SunnyIDW Publishing is proud to announce the release of The Complete Junior and Sunny, which presents the full run of these historic comics created, written, and illustrated by the legendary E.C. Comics artist/writer/editor Al Feldstein.

Imagine a young Betty Page type meeting up with some late-1940s, typical-teenage types (a la Archie), and you will get an idea of what is to be found in The Complete Junior and Sunny. Along with an in-depth Introduction by Grant Geissman, the book also presents the issue of Meet Corliss Archer that Feldstein also produced for the notorious Victor Fox, of Fox Feature Publications.

Done between 1947 and 1948 in the period right before he moved to E.C. Comics, Feldstein’s bold artwork and salacious figures are on full display, providing a wonderfully guilty pleasure. Long considered to be prime examples of late 1940s “headlight” and “Good Girl” art comics, issues of Junior and Sunny have been quite difficult to find and very expensive to obtain. Until now!

Look for the complete collection this December!

IDW Limited brings you Feldstein: The MAD Life and Fantastic Art of Al Feldstein!

IDW Limited announced today the release of a signed, limited-edition version of Feldstein: The MAD Life and Fantastic Art of Al Feldstein, signed by artist Al Feldstein and author Grant Geissman.  Al Feldstein is best known for his work as an artist/writer/ editor in the 1950s at the legendary EC Comics group, and for his nearly three decades of work as the editor of MAD magazine. Feldstein was inducted to the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 2003, and was awarded the Bram Stoker Lifetime Achievement award in 2011. Limited to 500 signed and numbered copies, this deluxe book features an exclusive cover and custom slipcase created especially for this edition.

Feldstein: The MAD Life and Fantastic Art of Al Feldstein is both a full biography and a coffee-table art book, spanning his entire life and career. Along with rare and previously unpublished photographs, this full-color book pictures every one of Feldstein’s EC comic book covers (many placed alongside the original artwork), several complete EC stories, plus nearly every splash page and house ad Feldstein did for EC. It traces his nearly thirty-year career as the editor of MAD, and presents his post-retirement work as a “fine” artist, including his prize-winning Western canvases and his many commissioned paintings “revisiting” his classic cover images from the 1950s. Author Grant Geissman pulls from all aspects of Feldstein’s life, not all of it sweetness and light. The exclusive IDW Limited cover features a beautiful Feldstein painting featuring EC’s horror hosts the Three GhouLunatics, various creatures, and a Svengali-like image of EC and MAD magazine publisher Bill Gaines. It’s a perfect homage and finishing touch to this remarkable edition.

The book is now available and in stock on http://idwlimited.com/books.html and you’d be MAD not to order a copy immediately!

SDCC 2013: IDW Announces Exclusives!

IDW Publishing is renowned for having great exclusives at San Diego Comic-Con every year, but 2013 finds them taking it to the next level. See below for a complete list of SDCC exclusives, which promise to be the most sought after of the show!

Some of the items will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store beginning July 2nd. Fans that preorder will be able to pick up their books from the IDW booth (These items will be noted below with an *asterisk).

IDW’s web store can be found here: IDW Con Exclusives

A limited edition product not available anywhere else, the Artist’s Edition: Best of EC Covers Portfolio will be on hand. Featuring eight amazing prints of class EC covers by such luminaries as Frank Frazetta, Wally Wood, Harvey Kurtzman and more, this edition will be limited to 250 copies and priced at $50. It will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, and there is a limit of 3 to a customer.

Speaking of EC and Artist’s Editions, an exclusive edition of the Best of EC Artist’s Edition will be premiered at Comic-Con as well! Signed by the legendary Al Feldstein, numbered, and limited to 250 copies, this edition will feature a variant cover and be priced at $200. This title will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, and there is a limit of 3 to a customer.

That’s not the only big Al Feldstein news at this show. Also debuting is, Felstein: Mad Life & Fantastic Art IDW is celebrating the release of this beautiful book with a deluxe, slip-cased version, complete with hand sketches and signatures from Feldstein himself! It will be limited to 100 copies, and be priced at $150, will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, and there is a limit of 3 to a customer. This book is literally at the printer as this is being written, and will be dashed to the show for a last-minute release!

AND, there’s another exclusive EC Artist’s Edition this year! Artist’s Edition: Jack Davis EC Stories Signed & Limited is signed by Jack Davis himself and has a variant cover by the incomparable artist. This edition will be limited to 250 copies and priced at $200. It will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, and there is a limit of 3 to a customer.

A special convention exclusive edition of Mark Schultz’s Xenozoic Tales: Artist’s Edition will also be available, featuring a variant cover by Mark Schultz! This edition is limited to just 250 copies, priced at $200, will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, and there is a limit of 3 to a customer.

For My Little Pony fans, IDW has a special surprise! An exclusive glitter variant cover of My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic #9. But, here’s the trick: it contains 8 pages of material that isn’t in the regular edition, featuring the Equestrian Girls! Fans worldwide will be clamoring to get a copy of this, and the ONLY place to read this story is in this exclusive, and the ONLY place to get it is the IDW booth at SDCC! This item is limited to 1,000 copies, with a limit of 5 to a customer. **Note – Watch for the Diamond Comics variant, available to Comics Retailers at SDCC.

Another My Little Pony treat is the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic Variant Edition HC. This is the only way to get this material in a hardcover format! With a variant cover by fan-favorite J. Scott Campbell, this edition is limited to 500 copies, priced at $25, with a limit of 3 to a customer, and only available at the IDW booth.

Skelton Crew Studio have done it again, producing not one, but two new Locke & Key high-quality pewter key replicas! 100 copies of the Locke & Key: Shadow Key and 100 copies of the Locke & Key: Music Box Key will be available for $25 each, only at IDW’s booth, with a limit of 3 to a customer.

But wait, there’s more!

  • The Hollows Variant Edition HC – Variant cover by Sam Kieth, limited to 200, priced at $25, only available at the IDW booth, limit of 3 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by Chris Ryall and Sam Kieth!
  • Worlds of Sam Keith Variant Edition HC – Variant cover by Sam Kieth, limited to 200, priced at $50, it will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, limit of 3 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by Sam Kieth!
  • The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror Variant Edition HC – Variant cover by Walter Simonson, limited to 100, priced at $25, only available at the IDW booth, limit of 3 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by Walter Simonson and Mark Waid!
  • The Rocketeer/The Spirit: Pulp Friction #1 Variant – Variant cover by Darwyn Cooke, limited to 500, priced at $5, only available at the IDW booth, limit of 5 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by Mark Waid!
  • X-Files: Season 10 #1 Variant – Variant cover by Joe Corroney, limited to 500, priced at $10, only available at the IDW booth, limit of 5 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by X-Files creator Chris Carter, writer Joe Harris and artist Joe Corroney!
  • Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Artobiography Variant Edition HC – Variant cover by Kevin Eastman, limited to 250, priced at $50, it will be available for pre-order from IDW’s web store*, limit of 3 to a customer. Get it signed at the show by Kevin Eastman!

In addition to all these exclusives, IDW will be debuting advance copies of two highly anticipated books! Superman: The Silver Age Newspaper Dailies Vol. 1 (100 copies available, priced at $50, only available in the booth) and Berkeleyworks: The Art of Berkeley Breathed: From Bloom County and Beyond (100 copies available, priced at $50, only available in the booth) will be seen for the first time anywhere! Get these books signed at the IDW booth by Dean Mullaney and Berkeley Breathed!

Once again, IDW is proud to have Ashley Wood and ThreeA as a part of their booth with exclusives in tow! Ash’s Machine Sabbath Variant Edition HC (250 copies available, priced at $25, only available in the booth) and Glitter Sausage Variant Edition SC (500 copies available, priced at $25, only available in the booth) promise to be exciting additions to the Ashley Wood library.

But Ash is bringing a lot more than that! For a complete list of what ThreeA has in store for SDCC this year, visit their blog here:  http://www.threeaonline.com/blog/

IDW Limited will of course be well represented in the booth as well, bringing their incredible assortment of small-run merchandise. For a complete rundown on IDW Limited’s amazing items, go here: http://www.idwlimited.com

Providing an exclusive suitable for each and every fan in the building, the IDW Booth promises to be one of the place to be at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con!

Classic Horror Reviews: Crime Patrol #15 & #16


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Crime Patrol 15 The most famous of the EC horror comics created by Bill Gaines and Al Feldstein is Tales from the Crypt, which was eventually turned into a popular HBO show that lasted for seven seasons. But before they settled on the formula that would make them famous and lead to congressional hearings, Gaines and Feldstein premiered their horror host, the Crypt Keeper in the pages of Crime Patrol. He first appeared in issue #15 in a story called “Return From the Grave.”

This first tale is introduced by the “Keeper of the Crypt of Terror,” a spooky guy who bears little resemblence to the Crypt Keeper of the television series and the story is more a crime tale than a horror tale, but it does contain the seeds of the genre that would take over EC comics. “Return From the Grave” contains nothing supernatural, despite what the title might suggest, it’s mearly the tale of two unscrupulous businessmen outsmarted by their partner who they try to talk into suicide. In a Shakespearean twist, their own guilt does them in, with one guy so scared he falls out an open window to his death while the other shoots himself to prevent the “ghost” of his antagonist from getting him.

Crime Patrol 16 The next issue of Crime Patrol expands its more horror-style tales and continues the presence of the now-labeled Crypt Keeper. Most of the stories here are still crime-oriented, but the twists grow more like what the later EC comics would be known for and elements of the supernatural make their way into the issue. “The Corpse in the Crematorium,” although it has a very horror-oriented title, is really a straight-forward tale of a man who has catalepsy and falls into a fit for three days that makes him appear to be dead and his fiancee’s frantic search for him. It’s really derivative of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Premature Burial.” Next is “Trapped in the Tomb,” another tales without any twists or supernatural elements, it’s merely the story of one jealous archaeologist trying to kill another over treasure. The third story is a tex-only short, “A Bottle of Murder,” that may be one of the first apocalyptic tales to appear in comics. It describes the journey of a bottle of a material so explosive that simply opening the bottle would level an entire city. The bottle is lost by government agents and winds its way through a path of people, many of whom try to open the bottle to no avail because it has a reverse thread. If anyone figures that out, the town goes nuclear.

The first element of the supernatural in the comic is in the next story, “The Graveyard Feet,” which is one of the long line of stories where a man receives a transplant of a body part and those body parts have a “memory” or connection to their former owner. In this case, the body part is feet and in a ridiculous turn, the feet remember savate from their former owner, turning their new owner into somewhat of a superhero who goes after a evil doctor who is experimenting on people in gruesome ways. The next text-only story, “Voodoo Vendetta,” is the first story in the series that one would think of as a classic Tales from Crypt-style story, in that it has an abusive man being pursued by a living voodoo doll. The final tale, fully narrated by the Crypt Keeper, tells the tale of a many who inherits a castle, which has been moved to the U.S. from Europe, and a large sum of money if he can live through two nights in the castley. As the title suggests, that won’t be easy because of “The Spectre in the Castle.” Rumor has it that the previous master of the castle always comes back to kill one of the new residents of the castle. The new owner and his wife quickly start seeing strange occurances and fear for their lives, but is it really a ghost, or something more, well, crime-oriented?

Art: The art from Al Feldstein and Johnny Craig is quite good and it does a great job of evoking fear (even when the story itself doesn’t), shows a sense of humor and captures an era in time very well. I’m guessing that’s one of the key reason the comics became so successful. Rating: 8

Plot: The two issues of Crime Patrol that deal with what would soon be EC’s signature style (issue 17 of the series would be renamed The Crypt of Terror) are not great reads, as most of the stories are a bit underdeveloped and cliched. It’s distinctly possible that I’m only thinking of them as cliched because I’ve since seen these type of stories a lot, but even if these are the originators of these particular tropes, they aren’t the best-executed versions of the stories, so they still are lacking. Rating: 6

Overall: 7

Recommendation: While these are good to read because they are the start of Tales from the Crypt and the Crypt Keeper, they are far from great stories and I would recommend that if you like the genre, you buy the reprints. The originals aren’t worth what they would cost, except for collectors.