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Returning To The X-Men: Powers Of X #5

It’s been nearly six years since I last picked up a new X-Men comic with any real consistency. The last series I read with any regularity featuring the merry mutants was Jason Aaron‘s Wolverine and the X-Men. Which apparently ended around six years ago. It’s fair to say that I’m a little out of touch with that side of the Marvel Universe (though I have been following both Old Man Logan and Dead Man Logan, but those series didn’t really involve the X-Men as much as a team book would). More than a little, honestly. A lot has happened in the six years I’ve been away, and since I barely pay attention to solicitations I have missed most of it.

But with Johnathan Hickman steering the X-Men in a new direction with both House and Powers Of X, I thought this might be a good time to start reading X-Men comics again.

But how easy is it to jump back in relatively blind after more than half a decade away? Join me, and I’ll tell you.


Expect spoilers as I try to make sense of the comic.


I’ve been really enjoying the House/Powers Of X event thus far, it has been an interesting reintroduction to the X-Men for me, and is an event that isn’t using huge set piece fight scenes to sell comics. No, the appeal of this event for me is that we’re getting a story that’s going to reframe how we look at the X-Men in the Marvel Universe, an event that is more of a beginning than a culmination of several years worth of preplanning and build up.

It is perhaps the most accessible event Marvel have had in years, with the main story being told in House Of X with Powers filling in the missing pieces from that story. Case in point with this issue as we learn how Xavier developed the current iteration of Cerebro which allows for a full back up of a mutant’s mind, memories and such.

Kind of like restoring an old version of the novel you’re working on after you overwrite the wrong save file.

At this point in the story, as we come to the finale of the series, the end that’s going to be a beginning, there’s no reason for the series to appeal to new readers. As somebody who hasn’t read any X-Men comics in years, at this point I’m not feeling out of my depth at all – as the series has progressed it has been less alienating to new readers, which is exactly what I had hoped would be the case.

How it ends at this point in the game is more of an interest to me, and how well it sets up the next phase of the X-Men’s story… will you need to be familiar with the House/Powers event going forward?

It’s an interesting question I’ll probably try to answer…

“You see I know how you humans love your symbolism, almost as much as you love you religion. And I wanted you – I needed you – to understand… you have new gods now.”

Magneto, House Of X, #1 p.47.
I keep leaving this image and quote in the column because, for me, it’s emblematic of the series as a whole. It’s Hickman, through Magneto, setting the stage for the future of the X-Men.

Powers Of X #5 was a great change of page for the story, and consequently builds the anticipation for House #5 after last week’s comic. We all know that somehow things will be resolved to a new status quo (after all the solicitations that I have seen are pretty clear about that), but how has yet to be revealed.

I can’t wait to see what’s going to come our way next week.


Will I understand next week’s installment in the saga, House Of X #5? Do I regret skipping six years of X-Books? Am I ever going to find out how Xavier is walking again*?

We might find out next week. We might not.

Marvel provided a FREE copy for review purposes, but I read the comic in print from my LCS.

*The answer is yes, but it made no sense when two of my friends told me individually last week, but it basically boils down to “comics being comics” which I’ve kind of accepted with an air of nonchalance.

Returning To The X-Men: Powers Of X #4

It’s been nearly six years since I last picked up a new X-Men comic with any real consistency. The last series I read with any regularity featuring the merry mutants was Jason Aaron‘s Wolverine and the X-Men. Which apparently ended around six years ago. It’s fair to say that I’m a little out of touch with that side of the Marvel Universe (though I have been following both Old Man Logan and Dead Man Logan, but those series didn’t really involve the X-Men as much as a team book would). More than a little, honestly. A lot has happened in the six years I’ve been away, and since I barely pay attention to solicitations I have missed most of it.

But with Johnathan Hickman steering the X-Men in a new direction with both House and Powers Of X, I thought this might be a good time to start reading X-Men comics again.

But how easy is it to jump back in relatively blind after more than half a decade away? Join me, and I’ll tell you.


Expect spoilers as I try to make sense of the comic.


At this point in the story, as we tip the bridge and start the journey to the end, it’s pretty easy to follow along with the story in general. There are still moments that have me wondering what I’ve missed in the last six or so years, but they’re fewer and farther between at this point which means that as the series has progressed it has been less alienating to new readers.

Which makes sense, honestly.

If you weren’t able to follow a story at this point then you’d have to wonder just what in the hell you’d been reading for the past eight comics/

Powers of X #4

The only real struggle I had with the issue was the nature of Mr. Sinister’s appearance. Issue is a strong word, because I had always seen the character as a darkly sinister scientist, not what we saw here. Still, I’ve long accepted that there are things I don’t know because it has been a long time since I’ve read about certain characters, and this wasn’t enough to throw me away from the story.

Otherwise, the comic is a easy enough to follow, acting as a place for readers to learn more about how the Krakoan home for mutants came to be, and the depths of Xavier’s plan over the years. It’s a needed exposition issue (especially for the person wondering whether this was talked about before the event began), and certainly a welcome change of pace after the death heavy House Of X #4 last week.

The artistic team of R.B. Silva (pencils), Adriano Di Benedetto (inks) and Marte Gracia (colours) remain strong, giving the comic a bold yet classic look across each page, breathing a vivid life to Hickman’s story.

“You see I know how you humans love your symbolism, almost as much as you love you religion. And I wanted you – I needed you – to understand… you have new gods now.”

Magneto, House Of X, #1 p.47.
I keep leaving this image and quote in the column because, for me, it’s emblematic of the series as a whole. It’s Hickman, through Magneto, setting the stage for the future of the X-Men.

Powers Of X #4 was a great change of page for the story, and consequently builds the anticipation for House #5 after last week’s comic. We all know that somehow things will be resolved to a new status quo (after all the solicitations that I have seen are pretty clear about that), but how has yet to be revealed.

I can’t wait to see what’s going to come our way next week.


Will I understand next week’s installment in the saga, House Of X #5? Do I regret skipping six years of X-Books? Am I ever going to find out how Xavier is walking again*?

We might find out next week. We might not.

Marvel provided a FREE copy for review purposes, but I read the comic in print from my LCS.

*The answer is yes, but it made no sense when two of my friends told me individually last week, but it basically boils down to “comics being comics” which I’ve kind of accepted with an air of nonchalance.

Returning To The X-Men: Powers Of X #3

It’s been nearly six years since I last picked up a new X-Men comic with any real consistency. The last series I read with any regularity featuring the merry mutants was Jason Aaron‘s Wolverine and the X-Men. Which apparently ended around six years ago. It’s fair to say that I’m a little out of touch with that side of the Marvel Universe (though I have been following both Old Man Logan and Dead Man Logan, but those series didn’t really involve the X-Men as much as a team book would). More than a little, honestly. A lot has happened in the six years I’ve been away, and since I barely pay attention to solicitations I have missed most of it.

But with Johnathan Hickman steering the X-Men in a new direction with both House and Powers Of X, I thought this might be a good time to start reading X-Men comics again.

But how easy is it to jump back in relatively blind after more than half a decade away? Join me, and I’ll tell you.


Expect spoilers as I try to make sense of the comic.


Much to my surprise, I was expecting to read House Of X #3 this week, not Powers Of X #3. That’s what I get for not paying attention to solicitations, I guess.

If you’ve been reading the entire series so far, and by that I mean everything under the House/Powers Of X banner and not just Powers then you’ll have absolutely no problem reading this comic. It focuses on the Year 100 timeline that you’ll remember from previous issues of Powers, an era where there are less than a dozen mutants/X-Men left in the solar system (really at this point, mutant and X-Man are one and the same). This issue follows the suicide mission, with said remaining mutants trying to find the information about when Nimrod, the machine responsible for the subjugation of humanity became active.

There’s a really interesting outcome with this story, and it’s perhaps the first real instance on the House/Powers being a single series.

I’ve gotta say, that so far this has been one of my favourite issues that I’ve written about for this column because it’s one of the few we’ve had since the event began that you can fully enjoy after having read only the comics in the event so far. There is literally no prior knowledge you need, as long as you have a passing familiarity with the characters – which you should have if you’ve been following the story since House Of X #1.

The exposition pages return again; this time they return to the map of nine of Moira X’s different lives as well as a couple of pages illustrating just how dire things have become in this timeline. There’s also more of the mutant language scattered throughout the comic, too, and if you have the time, patience or google ability to translate it, then you’ll uncover another layer to this comic. I haven’t done that yet, and probably won’t because I am far too lazy, but I love that it’s there.

Once again, the artists are on point. R.B. Silva is the artist and is joined on inking by Adriano Di Benedetto and colour artist Marte Gracia. The trio are solid, providing the comic with a visual gravitas that’s on par for the story that Hickman is telling within the issue. The action is phenomenally choreographed, and in some places it’s oddly shocking, heartbreaking and remarkably satisfying.

This issue is going to have reverberations across the series – perhaps not in the same way House Of X #2 has over the entire Marvel Universe, but certainly within the event as a whole.

There’s nothing in Powers Of X #2 anywhere close to as spine tingling as this moment from House Of X #1. Full quote below.

“You see I know how you humans love your symbolism, almost as much as you love you religion. And I wanted you – I needed you – to understand… you have new gods now.”

Magneto, House Of X, #1 p.47.
I keep leaving this image and quote in the column because, for me, it’s emblematic of the series as a whole. It’s Hickman, through Magneto, setting the stage for the future of the X-Men.

Powers Of X #3 is one of my favorite issues in the series so far. It’s a great payoff comic five issues in, and one that keeps the pacing of the event absolutely on point. I loved everything about this comic, and am amazed that Hickman has been able to meet the expectations that I had for this issue.

I can’t wait to see what’s going to come our way next week.


Will I understand next week’s installment in the saga, House Of X #3? Do I regret skipping six years of X-Books? Am I ever going to find out how Xavier is walking again*?

We might find out next week. We might not.

Marvel provided a FREE copy for review purposes, but I read the comic in print from my LCS.

*The answer is yes, but it made no sense when two of my friends told me individually last week, but it basically boils down to “comics being comics” which I’ve kind of accepted with an air of nonchalance.

Returning To The X-Men: Powers Of X #2

This column was slightly delayed this week due to a few power outages in my neck of the woods, and my lack of foresight in keeping my laptop charged.


Powers of X #2

But with Johnathan Hickman steering the X-Men in a new direction with both House and Powers Of X, I thought this might be a good time to start reading X-Men comics again.

It’s been nearly six years since I last picked up a new X-Men comic with any real consistency. The last series I read with any regularity featuring the merry mutants was Jason Aaron‘s Wolverine and the X-Men. Which apparently ended around six years ago. It’s fair to say that I’m a little out of touch with that side of the Marvel Universe (though I have been following both Old Man Logan and Dead Man Logan, but those series didn’t really involve the X-Men as much as a team book would). More than a little, honestly. A lot has happened in the six years I’ve been away, and since I barely pay attention to solicitations I have missed most of it.

But how easy is it to jump back in relatively blind after more than half a decade away? Join me, and I’ll tell you.


Expect spoilers as I try to make sense of the comic.


Start this event completely ignorant to much of the X-Men’s last five or so years has been an interesting experience. With Powers Of X #1, I wasn’t entirely sure what shape the story would take. We got three different timelines – Year 0, Year 100 and Year 1000 – in the first book, and that’s the same in issue #2. It’s giving the Powers Of X part of the story an anthology like feel, which helps someone like me realize that the futures we’re seeing we haven’t really explored much before, unless they stem from one of the many lives of Moira X.

The three timelines are all interesting for their own reasons, and I’m curious to see how this will all play into the whole as the House/Powers story unfolds over the next month and change, but the one that’s taken my interest the most, especially after this issue, is the Year 100 one. Seeing the X-Men on the back foot like never before, out of options and facing a culture ending threat… it almost sounds familiar, and yet it feels fresh. Which is an odd feeling when you really think about it, but I’m not going to question it too much.

I’ve learnt over the years that sometimes it’s okay to take things as the author intends without question too much until the finished product is in my hands.

The last issue in the Powers installment didn’t make as big an impression as the House Of X counterpart, and the same can ultimately be said for this issue. But then after the massive revelations in House Of X #2, I can’t exactly expect anything different. But that two two series tie into each other strongly is beyond doubt, as is evidenced by the Year 0 story in this issue. One could argue that House Of X #2 is merely the explanation between scenes in the Year 0 stories in Powers Of X. My questioning in the last column as to whether this series is required reading in order to get the full picture has a slightly clearer answer; at this point, I’d wager that you’re going to want to spend the money on both House and Powers Of X, though the former is still the stronger of the two.

Just as in the previous issue covered in this column, Powers Of X #2 also includes some handy dandy exposition pages that come almost immediately after you’ve read the pages that’ll make you wonder what the future terms mean. It’s a great way to add in some additional information without over burdening the dialogue with information for the readers. There’s also more of the mutant language scattered throughout the comic, too, and if you have the time, patience or google ability to translate it, then you’ll uncover another layer to this comic.

I haven’t any of those things, so other than the first issue I haven’t bothered to decipher the code. But it’s a cool feature for those that do.

Once again, the artists are on point. R.B. Silva is the artist and is joined on inking by Adriano Di Benedetto and colour artist Marte Gracia. The trio are solid, giving the comic and each time period within a unique visual flavour that comes together to form a perfect pecan pie (there’s no reason I chose pecan other than for alliteration).

There’s nothing in Powers Of X #2 anywhere close to as spine tingling as this moment from House Of X #1. Full quote below.

“You see I know how you humans love your symbolism, almost as much as you love you religion. And I wanted you – I needed you – to understand… you have new gods now.”

Magneto, House Of X, #1 p.47.

Powers Of X #2 is a pretty good comic – it is one that’s almost worth the elevated price of admission (at regular price this’d be absolutely worth it). As it is, it’s still worth a read; especially if you’re an X-Fan , new or old, who wants to know what’s going to happen in the company’s future.


Will I understand next week’s installment in the saga, House Of X #3? Do I regret skipping six years of X-Books? Am I ever going to find out how Xavier is walking again*?

We might find out next week. We might not.

Marvel provided a FREE copy for review purposes, but I read the comic in print from my LCS.

*The answer is yes, but it made no sense when two of my friends told me individually last week, but it basically boils down to “comics being comics” which I’ve kind of accepted with an air of nonchalance.

Review: Powers of X #2

Powers of X #2

As a science fiction story, Powers of X #2 is fantastic. As an X-Men comic, things are a bit more debatable. Writer Jonathan Hickman continues to reshape the X-Universe with this issue.

Powers of X #2 picks up from the debut issue taking us through numerous time periods in X-history. It leaves a lot of questions out there but Hickman is more focused here. There’s a theme that permeates through each segment challenging the reader to think. In that way, the comic is a science fiction success. It uses the story and concepts to explore humanity and our world. If it weren’t set in the Marvel and X-Universe, the comic would be a triumph but as is, there’s an issue in that it leaves too much unexplained and contradictory.

With the revelation of a mutant that can reincarnate and has been shifting the Marvel Universe history, Hickman has created a means to explain X-history, contradictions, and his new take in a deus ex machina. Here it’s used to drive the story and issue highlighting how intertwined the series is with House of X. With that out of the way, Hickman can begin to explore some themes and concepts, a tradition of the best X-Men stories.

There’s a more traditional X-Men story presented as two attacks are planned in two eras. It has more of a feel of an X-Men comic as they see the threat and take it head on with a battle with odds they can’t win. It’s about as close to a classic X-Men story that Hickman has reached so far.

The art by R.B. Silva continues to be stellar. With ink by Silva and Adriano Di Benedetto, color by Marte Gracia, and lettering by Clayton Cowles, the story is beautiful to look at. Designs are familiar and new at the same time. Classic characters are reinvented in a new way and it’ll have you staring at pages. The art compliments Hickman’s science fiction direction with some inspired looks and design.

Powers of X #2 is the best release so far as Hickman’s vision is clearer and the set up is out of the way. His hook has been presented elsewhere and he can now focus on his voice. We’ll see where things go from here but the issue is a challenge to the reader to think about visions of society. It does what science fiction does best. Now, to get that whole X-Men thing in there a bit better.

Story: Jonathan Hickman Art: R.B. Silva
Ink: R.B. Silva, Adriano Di Benedetto Color: Marte Gracia
Letterer: Clayton Cowles Design: Tom Muller
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.5 Overall: 8.0 Recommendation: Read

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Returning To The X-Men: Powers Of X #1

It’s been nearly six years since I last picked up a new X-Men comic with any real consistency. The last series I read with any regularity featuring the merry mutants was Jason Aaron‘s Wolverine and the X-Men. Which apparently ended around six years ago. It’s fair to say that I’m a little out of touch with that side of the Marvel Universe (though I have been following both Old Man Logan and Dead Man Logan, but those series didn’t really involve the X-Men as much as a team book would). More than a little, honestly. A lot has happened in the six years I’ve been away, and since I barely pay attention to solicitations I have missed most of it.

But with Johnathan Hickman steering the X-Men in a new direction with last week’s House Of X #1 I thought this might be a good time to start reading X-Men comics again.

But how easy is it to jump back in relatively blind after more than half a decade away? Join me, and I’ll tell you.


Expect spoilers as I try to make sense of the comic.


I’ve been deliberately going into these comics completely blind. I’ve ignore any and all solicitations beyond knowing that House/Powers Of X is replacing all current ongoing X-Books and setting up the next decade or so of X-Men stories going forward (if the change is well received, if not I’d expect another event in a few years to reestablish the status quo). That being said, I’ve no idea if the future depicted in this comic has been visited before in previous issues of X-Men or one of the many off shoots.

Once again I have questions. Although this time it’s primarily just one; how old is Magneto, anyway? If we’re to assume that he is one of the very few comic book characters whose origin remains unchanged in terms of the year – and honestly, with his time in the Nazi concentration camps during World War II being such an important pillar of his character, there’s no way Marvel could rewrite that to reimagine the origin in a more recent time – then how the fuck is he still looking like he’s only in his late 50’s or so? Does his magnetism powers slow his aging? Is he immortal? A clone? Or is this one of those things we just ignore because Magneto is one of the most complex and interesting characters in comics?

Other than that, the comic reads almost as if it’s a condensed story taking place over three periods (ten, a hundred and a thousand years in the future). There’s also a prologue of sorts with a bald Xavier (which answers my question from last week as to whether he has hair) set more or less in the recent past and a brief moment in the same time frame as House of X #1. What this does, for me at least, is leave the comic largely forgettable as we don’t really get as much time with the newer characters as I would have hoped for. Unlike the excitement I felt after House Of X #1, Powers Of X #1 left me feeling a touch flat. Is it essential reading to the story? It’s far too early to tell, and I don’t want to lead you down the garden path until we’ve got more context.

Now despite the book having its struggles in the memorability department, I still enjoyed it. The introduction and conclusion of a huge conflict between humanity, mutants and machines is perhaps the primary focal point in this comic, though there’s also the constant railing against who you were expected to be that simmers just beneath the surface.

Just as in the previous issue covered in this column, Powers Of X #1 also includes some handy dandy exposition pages that come almost immediately after you’ve read the pages that’ll make you wonder what the future terms mean. It’s a great way to add in some additional information without over burdening the dialogue with information for the readers.

As far as being able to get into the comic as someone who hasn’t been around the X-Men in over half a decade (I feel old), it was about as easy as jumping into any first issue that’s effectively the second part of a story. The hidden code within the pages (it can be decoded if you have the time or the google skills) also adds a nice interactive element to the series.

Once again, the artists are on point. R.B. Silva is the artist and is joined on inking by Adriano Di Benedetto and colour artist Marte Gracia. The trio are solid, giving the comic and each time period within a unique visual flavour that comes together to form a perfect pecan pie (there’s no reason I chose pecan other than for alliteration).

Although my personal highlight of the overarching story so far is below, there are quite a few moments that’ll have you grinning ear to ear; Rasputin’s charge, Wolverine calling somebody else old despite the white hair on his chin and Cardinal simply being Cardinal.

There’s nothing in Powers Of X #1 anywhere close to as spine tingling as this moment from House Of X #1. Full quote below.

“You see I know how you humans love your symbolism, almost as much as you love you religion. And I wanted you – I needed you – to understand… you have new gods now.”

Magneto, House Of X, #1 p.47.

Powers Of X #1 is a pretty good comic – it is one that’s almost worth the elevated price of admission (at regular price this’d be absolutely worth it). As it is, it’s still worth a read; especially if you’re an X-Fan , new or old, who wants to know what’s going to happen in the company’s future.


Will I understand next week’s installment in the saga, House Of X #2? Do I regret skipping six years of X-Books? Am I ever going to find out how Xavier is walking again*?

We might find out next week. We might not.

Marvel provided a FREE copy for review purposes, but I read the comic in print from my LCS.

*The answer is yes, but it made no sense when two of my friends told me individually last week, but it basically boils down to “comics being comics” which I’ve kind of accepted with an air of nonchalance.

Review: Powers of X #1

Writer Jonathan Hickman continues to build his epic vision of the X-Men in Powers of X #1.

Story: Jonathan Hickman
Art: R.B. Silva
Ink: R.B. Silva, Adriano Di Benedetto
Letterer: Clayton Cowles
Color: Marte Gracia
Design: Tom Muller

Get your copy in comic shops now! To find a comic shop near you, visit http://www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Review: Uncanny X-Men #19

Uncanny X-Men #19

Uncanny X-Men #19 is when the magician reveals how they did their trick. Focused entirely on Emma Frost, the issue weaves her story and machinations. We learn about her manipulation and game of chess and how that’s impacted the X-Men. Why did Logan and Scott team up? Why did Scott have a list? What was up with that Mr. Sinister fight? Captain America is doing what? Anole stole what? It’s all explained here and it’s impressive.

Writer Matthew Rosenberg takes us in to the Hellfire Club. It’s a new club with very interesting members. Each makes you ponder what it all means and how things have shifted. Emma Frost sits at the head of it all, manipulating her way through life. But why is she doing it? Rosenberg reveals that too. We get a clear motivation and some struggles as she attempts to outmaneuver the person pulling her strings.

This is very much the moment in the film where you learn how the robber pulled off the heist. As each piece of the puzzle is shown, it all makes a bit more sense.

Rosenberg does kill off yet another character. It’s something this run will become known for, for better or worse.

The art is pretty solid in the issue. That’s in spite of numerous artists and inkers. The transition from one to the other is fairly smooth and doesn’t hinder the issue at all.

Uncanny X-Men #19 brings it all together. Uncanny X-Men #19 explains so much as to what has been going on. The issue also explains why some things have felt off in this run, though still fun. If you’re not more excited by the time the issue wraps up, I don’t know what to say, but this one has me loving the X-Men again. If you’re an X-fan, this is a must buy.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg Art: Carlos Villa, Carlos Gómez, Bob Quinn
Ink: Juan Vlasco, Adriano Di Benedetto, Michelle Delecki, Carlos Gómez, Bob Quinn
Color: Guru-eFX Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 8.0 Art: 7.85 Overall: 7.95 Recommendation:
Buy

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Uncanny X-Men #8

Uncanny X-Men #8

From the Age of Apocalypse to the end of the X-Men…and the dawn of the AGE OF X-MAN???

After the last issue detour which took us to the Age of Apocalypse, things are explained a bit better in Uncanny X-Men #8. The previous issue was a bit disjointed missing some key information and it’s this issue that lays things out a bit better putting the previous into better context. It’s an example where comics need to be judged by single issues as well as complete arcs.

Writers Matthew Rosenberg, Kelly Thompson, and Ed Brisson return us to Earth Prime where the debate that raged last issue continues with the rest of the X-Men. With the younger X-Men trapped with X-Man, is it worth sacrificing them to stop the greater threat? It’s an interesting debate, just like last issue and it’s a bit surprising who does what to resolve the issue.

The issue is a good mix of that moral debate along with the crazy you can expect in an X-Men comic, along with action… like a battle with Apocalypse!? Yeah, things are ramped up this issue leading us closer to the coming Age of X-Man. It’s a bit clearer by the end of this issue how that might come about.

The art too is improved. R.B. Silva delivers the pencils with Adriano Di Benedetto on ink, Rachelle Rosenberg on color, and Joe Caramagna handling the lettering. Silva, and the team’s, style really fits the issue and the action within. There’s a lot packed in with a lot to cover and different concepts and it all works really well. Apocalypse looks fantastic and Bishop too stands out as just looking like his old bad-ass self.

The issue is an improvement over last issue’s side quest and it gets the event back on track. Again, this is a prime example of having to judge the individual issue as well as the arc it’s a part of of. It lifts the previous issue and itself stands out as an action focused chapter of the event. Uncanny X-Men #8 feels like old-school X-Men and ups the excitement for what comes next.

Story: Matthew Rosenberg, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson
Art: R.B. Silva Ink: Andriano Di Benedetto

Color: Rachelle Rosenberg Letterer: Joe Caramagna
Story: 8.0 Art: 8.35 Overall: 8.15 Recommendation: Buy

Marvel Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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