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Review: Bloodshot #3

Bloodshot #3

Break out the popcorn before Bloodshot hits the big screen and witness the supersoldier unleashed in Bloodshot #3!

The origin issue of Eidolon, Bloodshot’s greatest nemesis in the making!

I’m going to go out on a limb and assume you’ve seen a popcorn action movie of some kind. The kind where you can walk in and just turn your brain off, munch some snacks and drink a Coke. You really don’t need to think about too much other than just enjoying what’s happening in front of your eyes. You know exactly what you’re getting, and the film delivers in every aspect.

The reason this is relevant is that this comic is as popcorn as they come. Now that’s not necessarily a bad thing, as long as your expectations are in the right place. Gone is the character-driven series penned by Jeff Lemire. His work is acknowledged within Bloodshot #3. That answers one of the questions I had with this series. That’s surrounding where the book fits in the character’s continuity.

Tim Seeley continues his breakneck pace for the third issue, moving the plot along in a swift manner that allows him to use every page within the comic to further the plot, whilst only barely fleshing out one or two of the supporting cast. The end result of this is a comic that focuses more on the visualization of the writer’s vision and the furtherance of the plot than the characters within the comics pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe, none of who seem to have wasted any energy or talent in moving the book along. The state of Bloodshot throughout this book is wonderfully uncomfortable as we see Bloodshot’s physical degradation reach new highs (or lows) as the character comes face to face with a new enemy who really tests the limits of Bloodshot’s powers. the art work for this sequence is messy (for clarification, I am not saying that messy is a bad thing in the case) and just oozes pain and suffering as you’re reading the comic.

Once again, this is a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story. It’s the epitome of a popcorn comic, but it does its job very well. At entertain rip through another twenty odd pages in the series that’ll likely wrap up eaely next year, conveniently just in time to be released in a trade. If you want some high octane action in your comic books, then you really can’t go wrong with this series. Each issue has been popcorn comics at its finest.

It’s a very fun book, and sometimes that’s all a comic needs to be.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Zindan #4

Zindan #4

When you have no options left, what do you do? Where do you turn? How do you go forward? These are the questions when it seems there’s no hope, that you must answer for yourself. When it seems as though you have no light guiding your dark days. If you grew up in a religious family, you would hear sayings that stoked your faith. From my Roman Catholic Filipino mother, I would hear “God will only put us through those things that make us better”.

From my Trinidadian Muslim father, I would hear “And He will provide him from he never could imagine. And whosoever puts his trust in Allah, then He will suffice him. Verily, Allah will accomplish his purpose. Indeed, Allah has set a measure for all things.” Faith gives us a vision where our eyes cannot guide us as we cannot see the future, but we can ask for a greater being to look out for us. We must remember these things when life throws us those curve balls we never saw coming. In the fourth issue of Zindan, Timur and Zain are still trying to pickup the pieces after an unfathomable betrayal.

We find the Shah of Punjab returning to his palace in Lahore, with this capital brimming with intrigue and hungry peoples lining the streets, as they revel in the victory, they had over the Ansaars, not knowing Zain and Timur are waiting in the shadows. We also find Tara and her companions fighting their way through the Shah’s men in the desert, trying to equalize the damage his men unleashed on the Ansaars. We also are taken to Herat, where Zain and Timur are being hunted by Tatar soldiers, as the betrayal they suffered in the last issue has left the brothers with few options. By issue’s end, as Timur finds a moment of solace only for it to be interrupted by the Tatar soldiers who are there to end the Last of the Ansaars.

Overall, an excellent issue that gives fans a complex world where the heroes look like the people of color this mythology is built on. The story by Omar Mirza is well developed and well characterized. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, an installment that proves Mirza is an expert storyteller.

Story: Omar Mirza
Art: Sajad Shah, Adelso Corona, Mostafa Moussa, La Beau Underwood, Bryan Valenza, Jessica Jimerson, Alonso Espinosa, Roberto Vargas,
and Joe Weems
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Bloodshot #2

Bloodshot #2

Bloodshot’s enemies are closing in. Can he unleash all of his abilities in time to survive in Bloodshot #2?

The supersoldier is no stranger to war, but this is a whole new kind of enemy…

And who is the mysterious masked woman called Eidolon?!

I’m not going to bother writing too much of a preamble to this book. I feel that it would be a disservice to a comic that’s a high octane thrill ride to pad out the review with an anecdote at the beginning.

Well, pad it out any more than I have done.

Bloodshot #2 is as close to an action movie in comic form as you could possibly get. There’s a lot going in this book that propels the plot along far faster than we typically see in a comic today. In comparison to books from twenty years ago when a single issue would often tell a long story. The pace of the book will take you off guard. Tim Seeley just doesn’t give you a chance to breathe. And for the most part that breathlessness works very well. Perhaps the only time where it doesn’t is at the very beginning when Bloodshot is in the air. The previous issue had him bloodied on the ground. Because it’s not integral to the plot as a whole after the second panel, I ended up just enjoying the art in the panel and moving on.

Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. They all seem to follow the principle of moving the comic as swiftly as possible. The artists do this with some very clean and vibrant artwork. There’s a touch of the uncomfortable as Bloodshot seems to melt for a couple of panels. It’s for a reason, thankfully.

We find out precious little about Eidolin, the character teased in the preview text other than her capabilities. That’s pretty par for the course, I suppose. As is the disproportionate amount of action scenes in the book. That’s not entirely a bad thing when you’ve got these artistic chops on the book.

Once again, this is a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story. As one of my most remembered commercials would often say, Bloodshot #2 does exactly what it says on the tin. There are no real surprises here. If you’re looking for a comic that’ll make you rethink your place in life, then this isn’t it. But if you want some high octane action then you really can’t go wrong with this series.

It’s a very fun book, and sometimes that’s all a comic needs to be.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Major X

Rob Liefeld returns to the X-Universe with his new creation, Major X!

Major X collects issues #1-6 and Major X #0.

Story: Rob Liefeld
Art: Rob Liefeld, Brent Peeples, Whilce Portacio
Color: Romulo Fajardo Jr.
Ink: Rob Liefeld, Adelso Corona, Dan Fraga, Scott Hanna, Whilce Portacio, Cory Hamscher
Letterer: Joe Sabino

Get your copy in comic shops now and in bookstores October 15! To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook or digitally and online with the links below.

Amazon
Kindle/comiXology
TFAW

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review
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Review: Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot is back with a few new thrilling tricks up his sleeve in Bloodshot #1!

No amount of high-octane explosions can keep Bloodshot from completing his new mission. Who is the mysterious BLACK BAR, and what do they want with Bloodshot?

Bloodshot: Rising Spirit left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. It wasn’t bad on the whole. A lot of the positives from that series writing comes from the contributions of Eliot Rahal. It stumbled artistically too in places. On the whole, was far from the quality of the previous Bloodshot series Reborn and Salvation.

Bloodshot #1 washes that taste entirely from my mouth.

Reading this comic the week of the real G7 Summit gives the comic a very timely feel. I particularly enjoyed the real world nod to the British Prime Minister’s first introduction to this level of the political sphere. It’s through his eyes that we are first (re)introduced to Bloodshot. Writer Tim Seeley, artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe make the bold, and much appreciated, choice not to retell the character’s origin.

Again.

Instead, for those who may be coming to this series because of the upcoming movie (release date of which is currently billed as February 2020) there is a brief recap of how the character came to be. It makes sense within the story and only needs just over a page and change. Most of that is dedicated to visual homages to previous series. That serves as a nice tip of the hat to longtime readers, and just looks awesome for newcomers (and everyone, really).

The comic’s story is, when you really look at it, pretty straight forward. There are no real surprises, though there’s nothing telegraphed either. Which is a strange sentence to write, but I’ll stick by it. Bloodshot #1 is a perfect (re)introduction to Bloodshot. It’s packed with exactly what you’d hope from with a character who is a walking army. It’s an extended fight sequence lovingly brought to life by the artistic team and some exposition along with explanation as to the general direction Seeley and the team will be taking Bloodshot over the next few issues.

It is, ultimately, a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story.

But the simplicity of the plot is actually one of the comic’s strengths and is the reason that you’ll be coming back. The simplicity is the hook. It pulls you in and you’re reminded that a comic doesn’t need to have anything more than the perfect balance of words and pictures to be a great piece of art.

Seeley doesn’t try to over complicate things, leaving plenty of room in the story for Booth, Corona and Dalhouse to flex their creative muscles. The art in this comic is right up my alley; clean lines, interesting panel usage and layouts, and some sharp and subtle colouring work. There’s a timelessness to this issue’s art; it looks as though it could have been published at any point in the last fifteen years whilst remaining fresh and exciting from cover to cover. Dalhouse utilizes a colouring method that feels far less digitally coloured than it probably is – his work adds a warmth to Booth and Corona’s black and white artwork.

As an issue, Bloodshot #1 is a comic with the final product being greater than the sum of its parts. I absolutely love it.

The list of comics I’ve read this week that are as good as Bloodshot #1 is depressingly small. This is just the ticket if you want an action-packed explosion of fun on your pull list.

Make no mistake, I will be buying this when it’s released next month.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Bloodshot #1

BLOODSHOT #1

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH
Inks by ADELSO CORONA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by DECLAN SHALVEY
Cover B by DAVE JOHNSON
Cover C by HANNAH TEMPLER
Cover D B/W/R Variant by JONBOY MEYERS
Pre-Order Edition by TIM SALE
Carbon Fiber Finish Variant Edition by JONBOY MEYERS
FOC on SEPTEMBER 2nd (reviews by then are greatly appreciated)
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

An all-new ongoing series starts here!

Bloodshot is a nanite-fueled supersoldier forever at war. What happens to the world when he starts picking his own battles?

Will this one-man army be able to end the fighting—or just leave more destruction in his wake?

BLOODSHOT #1

Preview: Bloodshot #1

BLOODSHOT #1

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH
Inks by ADELSO CORONA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Letters by DAVE SHARPE
Cover A by DECLAN SHALVEY
Cover B by DAVE JOHNSON
Cover C by HANNAH TEMPLER
Cover D B/W/R Variant by JONBOY MEYERS
Pre-Order Edition by TIM SALE
Carbon Fiber Finish Variant Edition by JONBOY MEYERS
FOC on SEPTEMBER 2nd (reviews by then are greatly appreciated)
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale SEPTEMBER 25th

An all-new ongoing series starts here!

Bloodshot is a nanite-fueled supersoldier forever at war. What happens to the world when he starts picking his own battles?

Will this one-man army be able to end the fighting—or just leave more destruction in his wake?

BLOODSHOT #1

Advanced Review: Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot #1

Bloodshot is back with a few new thrilling tricks up his sleeve in Bloodshot #1!

No amount of high-octane explosions can keep Bloodshot from completing his new mission. Who is the mysterious BLACK BAR, and what do they want with Bloodshot?

Bloodshot: Rising Spirit left a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. It wasn’t bad on the whole. A lot of the positives from that series writing comes from the contributions of Eliot Rahal. It stumbled artistically too in places. On the whole, was far from the quality of the previous Bloodshot series Reborn and Salvation.

Bloodshot #1 washes that taste entirely from my mouth.

Reading this comic the week of the real G7 Summit gives the comic a very timely feel. I particularly enjoyed the real world nod to the British Prime Minister’s first introduction to this level of the political sphere. It’s through his eyes that we are first (re)introduced to Bloodshot. Writer Tim Seeley, artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe make the bold, and much appreciated, choice not to retell the character’s origin.

Again.

Instead, for those who may be coming to this series because of the upcoming movie (release date of which is currently billed as February 2020) there is a brief recap of how the character came to be. It makes sense within the story and only needs just over a page and change. Most of that is dedicated to visual homages to previous series. That serves as a nice tip of the hat to longtime readers, and just looks awesome for newcomers (and everyone, really).

The comic’s story is, when you really look at it, pretty straight forward. There are no real surprises, though there’s nothing telegraphed either. Which is a strange sentence to write, but I’ll stick by it. Bloodshot #1 is a perfect (re)introduction to Bloodshot. It’s packed with exactly what you’d hope from with a character who is a walking army. It’s an extended fight sequence lovingly brought to life by the artistic team and some exposition along with explanation as to the general direction Seeley and the team will be taking Bloodshot over the next few issues.

It is, ultimately, a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story.

But the simplicity of the plot is actually one of the comic’s strengths and is the reason that you’ll be coming back. The simplicity is the hook. It pulls you in and you’re reminded that a comic doesn’t need to have anything more than the perfect balance of words and pictures to be a great piece of art.

Seeley doesn’t try to over complicate things, leaving plenty of room in the story for Booth, Corona and Dalhouse to flex their creative muscles. The art in this comic is right up my alley; clean lines, interesting panel usage and layouts, and some sharp and subtle colouring work. There’s a timelessness to this issue’s art; it looks as though it could have been published at any point in the last fifteen years whilst remaining fresh and exciting from cover to cover. Dalhouse utilizes a colouring method that feels far less digitally coloured than it probably is – his work adds a warmth to Booth and Corona’s black and white artwork.

As an issue, Bloodshot #1 is a comic with the final product being greater than the sum of its parts. I absolutely love it.

The list of comics I’ve read this week that are as good as Bloodshot #1 is depressingly small. This is just the ticket if you want an action-packed explosion of fun on your pull list.

Make no mistake, I will be buying this when it’s released next month.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Fallen World #3 (of 5)

FALLEN WORLD #3 (of 5)

Written by DAN ABNETT
Art by ADAM POLLINA
Colors by ULISES ARREOLA
Letters by JEFF POWELL
Cover A by BRETT BOOTH with ADELSO CORONA and ANDREW DALHOUSE
Cover B by FERNANDO DAGNINO with ULISES ARREOLA
Cover C by CASPER WIJNGAARD
Pre-Order Edition by DAVID MACK
$3.99 | 32 pgs. | T+ | On sale JULY 10th

The mind-controlled Bloodshot enlists the help of the Church Fallen to further his nefarious plans!

Rai comes face-to-face with the animalistic hybrids of the Kor’Tunga clan!

Can Rai stop the resurrection of Father, his greatest enemy, before it’s too late?

FALLEN WORLD #3

Review: Major X #6

Major X #6

Major X #6 epitomizes everything I’ve disliked in this series amplified. The comic may go down as the worst comic of 2019 with a disjointed story, laughable dialogue, inconsistent art, and being generally non-sensical.

Written by Rob Liefeld, with art by Liefeld, the issue doesn’t even pick up where the last left off. In Major X #5, the final page revealed the identity of Major X’s mother, Storm. When Major X #6 starts, we’re straight into a battle with the aged Namor. There’s no follow up. No real discussion. Just another battle that comes out of nowhere. And even then, the battle makes little sense.

In between panels which are supposed to show off Liefeld’s artistic talents, we get characters taking moments from the battle for speeches or to talk to each other as if everything is paused. While Namor battles, his kids are nowhere to be seen until the final moments. There’s no explanation of much of anything… it’s just bad. Add in dialogue that’s cringe-worthy and its a mess, unlike anything I’ve read in quite some time.

Judging from the opening few pages, Liefeld thinks it might be good?

The comic opens with Deadpool talking to a mysterious someone about how he’s needed asking “what took you so long?” It feels like Liefeld talking to Marvel and the reader as if Major X would shake up the X-Universe. There’s little debate that Liefeld’s contributions have been major in the X-Universe. This latest venture is something different. It’s some decent ideas that don’t feel fleshed out or thought out. It’s notes on a page without a coherent narrative to bring it together. And this has been part of Liefeld’s contributions. While he created Deadpool, others added the depth. Same with Cable and so many others. He’s a concept creator with others needing to take it home. Here too we’ll see that… eventually.

You’d think Liefeld’s art would be able to salvage this mess but that’s far from the case. Characters lose detail, panels make no sense in context (standing around to chat in battle?), and just generally choppy transitions from panel to panel and pages to pages. There’s moments but nothing memorable.

The issue is bad capping off a miniseries that seemed to get worse at it went on. Liefeld, and the team, made a splash with this, just not in the right way. Now, hopefully history repeats and another creator picks up the ball and does something interesting going forward with what has been set up.

Story: Rob Liefeld Art: Rob Liefeld
Ink: Rob Leifeld, Cory Hamscher, Adelso Corona
Color: Romulo Fajardo, Jr. Letters: Joe Sabino
Story: 1.0 Art: 5.0 Overall: 2.0 Recommendation: Pass

Marvel provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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