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Review: Bloodshot #7

Bloodshot #7

Before you see Vin Diesel’s Bloodshot on the big screen… leap into the thrilling comics with “Burned” Part One, kicking off in Bloodshot #7!

What better way to release a comic featuring the first character to appear on the big screen than by having it start with a new jumping on point? A first issue, you could say, and you wouldn’t be wrong – but with the comic already having had seven issues released (including Bloodshot #0) it would have been a touch disingenuous to renumber the series with the story still ongoing. Nobody would ever do that. Certainly not.

If you are looking to check the character out ahead of the movie, or you’re reading this after having seen the Sony Pictures Bloodshot movie starring Vin Diesal, then you’ll be happy to know that Bloodshot #7 is fairly new reader friendly. Cleverly paced dialogue that flows without feeling like forced exposition tells you everything you need to know.

Bloodshot has been one fast-paced and frenetic issue after another. It has been a great ride for the last seven issues. I’ve certainly enjoyed the series for what it is; a popcorn comic that has a depth to it that’s revealed further with each issue. Tim Seeley gives you a little more of his plan with each release. There are moments in this issue that change or enhance your idea of the characterizations of some characters inbetween the action. It’s this balance that allows you to fly through the book while still feeling like you’ve read more than the twenty-odd pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph feels familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing when my feelings on the visuals haven’t changed. Personally, I love how this book looks. The lines are clean and it’s very easy to discern what’s happening on every page.

Bloodshot #7 isn’t the most original story. It won’t shake you to your core or have you asking yourself deeply introspective questions. But not every comic needs to do that. What Bloodshot does, it does very well. Seeley, Booth, and co have been remarkably consistent issue to issue, and I can’t really find any fault in an issue that does exactly what it says on the tin (that may be an obscure reference for you – it’s from a UK add originating in the late 90’s from a company called Ronseal).

Bloodshot remains one of the series I look forward to reading each month. This wasn’t the best comic I’ve read this week, but it still comes with a big fat stamp of approval from me.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Marc Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.0 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Bloodshot #0

Bloodshot #0

Artist Mac Laming unleashes eye-popping artwork as the truth behind Bloodshot’s mission is revealed in Bloodshot #0!

After reading Bloodshot #0 part of me wondered why the comic hadn’t been released in sequence. This comic bridges the gap between the end of Harbinger Wars II and the beginning of the current Bloodshot series. It addresses how the events of Harbinger II and how he dealt with what he was forced to do.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the answer is not well.

The comic opens with Bloodshot in hiding. He’s trying to disappear and avoid the killing machine he once was, working on a pipeline in northwestern Siberia. Writer Tim Seeley takes a step back from the frenetic pace he’s been using in the six issues so far. He really delves into the psyche of a man who has been used and abused by friends and enemies alike.

Not only does Seeley explore Bloodshot’s broken soul, but he also shows us how he ends up doing what he’s doing at the beginning of Bloodshot #1. There’s a lot of story in this issue. It still doesn’t feel like you’re trying to fit seventeen eggs into a twelve pack.

Under Tim Seeley’s pen, Bloodshot has been one of the more consistent series that Valiant is currently publishing. It’s often a fast-paced action comic with enough hidden depths in each issue to stop it from being overly shallow. With the zero issue, Seeley has shown what he can do with the character when he slows the pace down. And it makes me hopeful that we’ll get more moments like this in the future.

Seeley is joined by artist Marc Laming who handles the art for the first time this series, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. Laming’s style acts as a visual bridge between Doug Braithwaite’s art at the end of Bloodshot Salvation and Brett Booth’s take on the character in the latest volume. The cold desolation of the comic’s setting is evident in the shades of blue and grey used when the scenes take place outside.

There’s a great full-page around the middle of the comic that emphasizes Bloodshot’s view of himself; a weapon to be used.

But who gets to use the weapon?

The comic does a great job of asking the question and offering an answer that we’ve been reading for the past six issues.

Bloodshot #0 is probably the best comic in the series so far. It is successful as a bridge between stories, as a single issue standalone story and as an introduction to Bloodshot #1 and the character as well. All in all, that’s a home run for the zero issue, which is far more than I expected from an issue which has often been little more than a stop-gap between the numbered issues.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Andrew Laming
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.5 Art: 9.2 Overall: 9.3 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Bloodshot #6

Bloodshot #6

The mysterious Eidolon’s origin finally revealed in Bloodshot #6! This issue will change Bloodshot forever, and you’ll never guess how it ends!

The above text came from the press email Valiant sent out, and, well they’re not wrong.

Bloodshot has been one of the most frenetic and fun series Valiant has put out in some time. It has been the very definition of a popcorn comic as I can currently think of; you don’t need to think too hard when reading this book; Tim Seeley has been able to give you almost everything you need in each issue to understand what is happening within those 22 pages of story. If ever there was a series for new readers to just pick up and enjoy, it would be this one.

And yet there are still moments of characterization, whether that’s in the beats in you see as Seeley lets you take a moment to breathe, or in the snappy dialogue between the characters as the bullets are flying. This balance allows you to get lost in the comic, absorbing the story beats that come like a rhythmic cadence between chaos on the page.

Seeley is joined once again by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

If the above paragraph feels familiar to you it’s because I copied it from the review of the last issue. It was as true then as it is for this issue, and I didn’t feel like I should try and craftily rewrite the same thing.

One of the things I’ve noticed in Tim Seeley’s Bloodshot is that he’s shied away from making Bloodshot utterly unstoppable. He can be hurt, he can be slowed down, and he can be beaten. This had had the effect of adding a level of risk to the story that could easily be missing given how the character has evolved as the unstoppable killing machine. Like other aspects of the comic, it’s refreshing. Whether it’s just a device to show how strong the enemies have been in the series or is going to be slowly established as the new status quo for the character we’ll discover in the coming months.

Bloodshot isn’t the most original story. It won’t shake you to your core or have you asking yourself deeply introspective questions. But not every comic needs to do that. What Bloodshot does, it does very well. As a pure comic book, there’s a lot of enjoyment on offer here. Seeley, Booth, and co have been remarkably consistent issue to issue, and I can’t really find any fault in an issue that does exactly what it says on the tin (that may be an obscure reference for you – it’s from a UK add originating in the late 90’s from a company called Ronseal).

Bloodshot remains one of the series I look forward to reading each month. This wasn’t the best comic I’ve read this week, but it still comes with a big fat stamp of approval from me.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.2 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review.

Review: Bloodshot #5

Bloodshot #5

Bloodshot goes on his scariest — and most personal — mission yet… at a horror movie convention?! A whole new era of Bloodshot is here in Bloodshot #5!

I’m not gonna lie to you. I don’t think I’ve had as much fun reading an action comic as I have Bloodshot in a long time. Yes, I’ve read some great books over the years, but there’s something fun about this book that you can’t ignore. Although the themes of freedom and enforced service are very present focal points in the comic, there’s a levity here. Bloodshot attending a horror convention and the scenes with him reacting to certain cosplayers and commenting on what he sees are a great balance to the darker sides of the comic.

What I found most impressive was how well Tim Seeley has geared the issue to new people. There’s enough exposition and background between the recap page and the dialogue to catch new readers up with what they have to know. It doesn’t give it all away should they decide to check out any of the collected editions of yore. Nor does it feel in any way forced or heavy-handed for long term readers.

Seeley is joined once again by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. All of whom combine for an aesthetic that appeals enormously to me. The style gives me a sense of nostalgia for the comic art I read growing up; it’s dynamic, clean and yet full of life and vibrancy.

Tim Seeley’s Bloodshot is a story about redemption for a man trying to atone for wrongs he had little choice in making. Watching the writer explore Bloodshot’s psyche and reintroduce him as a slightly more straightforward hero with a deeply troubled past is interesting because it feels like a natural evolution after what we’ve seen him go through over the previous series from Valiant – most recently Jeff Lemire’s acclaimed run.

I said last week that you really can’t go wrong with the series if you’re looking for a fun action-based comic – and I stand by that. This isn’t a revolutionary book, and there are arguably deeper comics out there – some even from the same publisher – but there are very few books on the racks that are as much fun as this one.

Bloodshot comes highly recommended from me.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.2 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review. I’ve also got a copy set aside to pick up tomorrow.

Review: Bloodshot #4

Bloodshot #4

All aboard as Bloodshot faces off against ghoulish monsters on a bullet train to the heart of darkness in Bloodshot #4!

High-speed thrills and blood-curdling chills lurk behind every turn in 2019’s best new action series!

There are times that you want to read a comic that’ll make you examine your core values. Who you are as a person and what your place is in the world. Then there are the times that you want to read a comic that doesn’t make you think. That places its main character in a situation that requires the prodigious use of violence to escape from. A comic like Bloodshot #4. As an action comic, this comic is unparalleled. It’s balls to the wall action interspersed with just enough story information as to why Bloodshot is shooting his way through a train. You’re never left wondering what’s going on or why.

Before you think this is just a mindless comic, rest assured there’s a little more to it. If you choose to look for it.

Tim Seeley kicks off the next arc of his Bloodshot run with a comic that’s a great jumping-on point for new readers. That’s without missing a beat from the previous three-issue arc. Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. None of whom seem to know how to make a bad Bloodshot comic.

With the comic set primarily on a train, there’s a sense of claustrophobia as the action unfolds within a speeding metal hunk. There’s also a slight feeling of familiarity. Train sequences can be found in numerous movies, whether it’s Captain America: The First Avenger, any one of the James Bond movies or even Under Siege. Train scenes are always popular in certain movies because when they’re done well they’re really good. And this comic gets it very right. There’s a brilliant moment with an improvised piece of cover in a firefight. It’s a savage battle and an uncomfortable question as Bloodshot finds himself needing protean to replenish his nanites.

As previously alluded to, there is more to this comic than the action. Bloodshot is trying to find his place in the world. Whether that’s as a hero or an avatar of justice (or vengeance) or as something else entirely. This issue finds the super-soldier unleashed as he points himself at a target of his choosing. This is where the depth of the comic comes in to play, and while it is pretty spelled out for readers, the implications of the between-the-lines could bear some interesting fruit.

This comic is a brilliant start to the new arc. It’s a fantastic introduction for anybody intrigued by the movie trailers. So far, you really can’t go wrong with this series.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 9.2 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Preview: Bloodshot #4

BLOODSHOT #4

Written by TIM SEELEY
Art by BRETT BOOTH
Inks by ADELSO CORONA
Colors by ANDREW DALHOUSE
Cover A by DECLAN SHALVEY
Cover B by MIKE MCKONE
Cover C by MARC LAMING
Preorder Edition Cover by SIMON BISLEY
On sale DECEMBER 18 | 32 pages, full color | $3.99 US | T+

NEW STORY ARC “The Long Shot” starts here!

All aboard as Bloodshot faces off against ghoulish monsters on a bullet train to the heart of darkness!

High-speed thrills and blood-curdling chills lurk behind every turn in 2019’s best new action series!

BLOODSHOT #4

“The Long Shot” Begins in Bloodshot #4 this December

Bloodshot #4 unleashes Valiant‘s supersoldier on a brand-new mission this December!

It’s bullets vs. claws in the first chapter of “The Long Shot,” a gripping new story starring the nanite-infused hero. Trapped in a bullet train, Bloodshot and his new allies, the Burned, square off against fearsome creatures in Bloodshot #4, an action-packed issue that serves as the perfect jumping on point before Vin Diesel makes his big screen debut as Bloodshot next year! The can’t-miss issue is crafted by best-selling writer Tim Seeley, iconic artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe.

Check out a preview of Blooshot #4‘s mayhem below! It goes on sale December 18th, 2019, and features covers by Declan ShalveyMike McKoneMarc Laming, and a preorder cover by Simon Bisley.

Blooshot #4

Review: Bloodshot #3

Bloodshot #3

Break out the popcorn before Bloodshot hits the big screen and witness the supersoldier unleashed in Bloodshot #3!

The origin issue of Eidolon, Bloodshot’s greatest nemesis in the making!

I’m going to go out on a limb and assume you’ve seen a popcorn action movie of some kind. The kind where you can walk in and just turn your brain off, munch some snacks and drink a Coke. You really don’t need to think about too much other than just enjoying what’s happening in front of your eyes. You know exactly what you’re getting, and the film delivers in every aspect.

The reason this is relevant is that this comic is as popcorn as they come. Now that’s not necessarily a bad thing, as long as your expectations are in the right place. Gone is the character-driven series penned by Jeff Lemire. His work is acknowledged within Bloodshot #3. That answers one of the questions I had with this series. That’s surrounding where the book fits in the character’s continuity.

Tim Seeley continues his breakneck pace for the third issue, moving the plot along in a swift manner that allows him to use every page within the comic to further the plot, whilst only barely fleshing out one or two of the supporting cast. The end result of this is a comic that focuses more on the visualization of the writer’s vision and the furtherance of the plot than the characters within the comics pages.

Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe, none of who seem to have wasted any energy or talent in moving the book along. The state of Bloodshot throughout this book is wonderfully uncomfortable as we see Bloodshot’s physical degradation reach new highs (or lows) as the character comes face to face with a new enemy who really tests the limits of Bloodshot’s powers. the art work for this sequence is messy (for clarification, I am not saying that messy is a bad thing in the case) and just oozes pain and suffering as you’re reading the comic.

Once again, this is a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story. It’s the epitome of a popcorn comic, but it does its job very well. At entertain rip through another twenty odd pages in the series that’ll likely wrap up eaely next year, conveniently just in time to be released in a trade. If you want some high octane action in your comic books, then you really can’t go wrong with this series. Each issue has been popcorn comics at its finest.

It’s a very fun book, and sometimes that’s all a comic needs to be.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

Review: Zindan #4

Zindan #4

When you have no options left, what do you do? Where do you turn? How do you go forward? These are the questions when it seems there’s no hope, that you must answer for yourself. When it seems as though you have no light guiding your dark days. If you grew up in a religious family, you would hear sayings that stoked your faith. From my Roman Catholic Filipino mother, I would hear “God will only put us through those things that make us better”.

From my Trinidadian Muslim father, I would hear “And He will provide him from he never could imagine. And whosoever puts his trust in Allah, then He will suffice him. Verily, Allah will accomplish his purpose. Indeed, Allah has set a measure for all things.” Faith gives us a vision where our eyes cannot guide us as we cannot see the future, but we can ask for a greater being to look out for us. We must remember these things when life throws us those curve balls we never saw coming. In the fourth issue of Zindan, Timur and Zain are still trying to pickup the pieces after an unfathomable betrayal.

We find the Shah of Punjab returning to his palace in Lahore, with this capital brimming with intrigue and hungry peoples lining the streets, as they revel in the victory, they had over the Ansaars, not knowing Zain and Timur are waiting in the shadows. We also find Tara and her companions fighting their way through the Shah’s men in the desert, trying to equalize the damage his men unleashed on the Ansaars. We also are taken to Herat, where Zain and Timur are being hunted by Tatar soldiers, as the betrayal they suffered in the last issue has left the brothers with few options. By issue’s end, as Timur finds a moment of solace only for it to be interrupted by the Tatar soldiers who are there to end the Last of the Ansaars.

Overall, an excellent issue that gives fans a complex world where the heroes look like the people of color this mythology is built on. The story by Omar Mirza is well developed and well characterized. The art by the creative team is gorgeous. Altogether, an installment that proves Mirza is an expert storyteller.

Story: Omar Mirza
Art: Sajad Shah, Adelso Corona, Mostafa Moussa, La Beau Underwood, Bryan Valenza, Jessica Jimerson, Alonso Espinosa, Roberto Vargas,
and Joe Weems
Story: 10 Art: 9.5 Overall: 9.6 Recommendation: Buy

Review: Bloodshot #2

Bloodshot #2

Bloodshot’s enemies are closing in. Can he unleash all of his abilities in time to survive in Bloodshot #2?

The supersoldier is no stranger to war, but this is a whole new kind of enemy…

And who is the mysterious masked woman called Eidolon?!

I’m not going to bother writing too much of a preamble to this book. I feel that it would be a disservice to a comic that’s a high octane thrill ride to pad out the review with an anecdote at the beginning.

Well, pad it out any more than I have done.

Bloodshot #2 is as close to an action movie in comic form as you could possibly get. There’s a lot going in this book that propels the plot along far faster than we typically see in a comic today. In comparison to books from twenty years ago when a single issue would often tell a long story. The pace of the book will take you off guard. Tim Seeley just doesn’t give you a chance to breathe. And for the most part that breathlessness works very well. Perhaps the only time where it doesn’t is at the very beginning when Bloodshot is in the air. The previous issue had him bloodied on the ground. Because it’s not integral to the plot as a whole after the second panel, I ended up just enjoying the art in the panel and moving on.

Seeley is joined by artist Brett Booth, inker Adelso Corona, colorist Andrew Dalhouse, and letterer Dave Sharpe. They all seem to follow the principle of moving the comic as swiftly as possible. The artists do this with some very clean and vibrant artwork. There’s a touch of the uncomfortable as Bloodshot seems to melt for a couple of panels. It’s for a reason, thankfully.

We find out precious little about Eidolin, the character teased in the preview text other than her capabilities. That’s pretty par for the course, I suppose. As is the disproportionate amount of action scenes in the book. That’s not entirely a bad thing when you’ve got these artistic chops on the book.

Once again, this is a fairly straight forward and simple comic book story. As one of my most remembered commercials would often say, Bloodshot #2 does exactly what it says on the tin. There are no real surprises here. If you’re looking for a comic that’ll make you rethink your place in life, then this isn’t it. But if you want some high octane action then you really can’t go wrong with this series.

It’s a very fun book, and sometimes that’s all a comic needs to be.

Story: Tim Seeley Art: Brett Booth
Ink: Adelso Corona Color: Andrew Dalhouse Letterer: Dave Sharpe
Story: 8.9 Art: 9.1 Overall: 9.2 Recommendation: Buy

Valiant provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review

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