Tag Archives: 1917

1917 Expands Taking the Weekend Box Office and Knocking Off The Rise of Skywalker

1917

1917 has got momentum after high profile award wins and nominations taking the weekend box office. The film’s theaters expanded as well as its gross with the film earning an estimated $36.5 million. The movie’s theater count went from 11 the last two weeks to 3,434 this past weekend, perfect timing for its award wins. That saw a massive increase in dollars beating expectations. The film also debuted in 30 international markets earning nearly $20 million.

The movie received an “A” CinemaScore for its limited release and an “A-” with the wider release. The crowd was 60% male and 80% aged 25 or older.

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker dropped to second place earning an estimated $15 million. That brings its domestic total to $478.2 million after four weeks. Internationally, the movie earned $24.2 million to bring that total to $511.4 million. With a worldwide total of $989.6 million, there’s little doubt the film will cross the $1 billion mark this week.

In third place was Jumanji: The Next Level with earned an estimated $14 million after five weeks. Domestically, the film has earned $256.8 million. Internationally, the film added $22.6 million from 65 markets to bring that total to $414 million. Worldwide the film has earned $671 million.

Fourth place looks to be a virtual tie though that may change as the numbers get adjusted. Like a Boss and Just Mercy each earned an estimated $10 million.

Like a Boss‘ debut is jut shy of expectations and the film generally survived bad reviews. The CinemaScore was a “B” from opening day crowds and the audience was 56% female and 65% aged 25 or older.

Just Mercy expanded to 2,375 from 4 the last two weeks. Audiences gave the film an “A+” CinemaScore and the film has been receiving positive reviews. The audience was 60% female and 85% were aged 25 or older.

While no comic related films made the weekend box office list, we’ll be back in an hour for a look at how they did over the week.

1917 – Movie Review: Visual Tricks Overshadow War’s Human Story

1917

1917 definitely has a very specific energy, and that is tension built on top of tension on top of tension. But like a meal whose flavor profile is just based on one flavor, the final effect feels a little flat, even if it’s so technically stunning. Director Sam Mendes has always been an arresting visual director, from his award-winning work on American Beauty two decades ago to the comic-adapted Road to Perdition to (the best Bond film) Skyfall. And here he’s aided by (one of the greatest living cinematographers) Roger Deakins (who also teamed with Mendes on Skyfall) and editor Lee Smith, who help him achieve the illusion of a single, uninterrupted shot for the entire length of this gorgeous and arresting movie. The film’s strength and weakness are that the gimmick works incredibly effectively. But the story and characters take a backseat to the narrative and technical constraints, which somewhat hamstrings a technically amazing film.

Said story and characters are simple enough: in the waning days of World War I in the trenches of the Western Front, two English doughboys are dispatched to warn a battalion to call off an attack scheduled for dawn. To make the matter more personal, one of the infantrymen’s brother serves in that battalion, so they’re not only saving the war effort, but a family member. The camera follows the action in what appears to be one interrupted take (although it’s fairly clear where they used specific transitions to hide their cuts) and the results are intense.

Much like in Hitchcock’s classic film Rope, (and used in a somewhat more gimmicky way in Birdman) the lack of cuts helps elevate the dramatic tension. You never quite notice how much we depend on a simple cut to alleviate that anxiety that simply comes from letting a take run long. Especially in our quick-cut, quick edit world, we are simply not used to a filmmaker using a single shot for an extended period of time and it becomes incredibly unnerving. The way the camera moves, and what it chooses to linger on (including disturbing images of the horrors of war) also double and triple down on the dramatic tension.

The downside is that our characters and actors take a backseat to all of this, as a veritable who’s who of acclaimed British actors show up all too briefly. Colin Firth and Benedict Cumberbatch bookend the film as British generals in their strongest stiff upper lip personas, and along the way we also run across Andrew Scott (Hot Priest sighting!) and Mark Strong. But where the film actually works best is in some of its quieter moments, such as encountering a young French mother trying to protect her infant while under siege/occupation by German forces.

1917 surely deserves the awards nominations and attention it has been receiving. As a technical achievement, it is breathtaking. But, then again, so is Avengers: Endgame. And in a year where we’re once again discussing the overwhelming whiteness and maleness of awards nominees, it’s hard to not take a second look at 1917 for what it is: a technical masterpiece which puts all of the talents of Roger Deakins and Mendes on full display, but which is choosing to tell a very traditional story centered around the heroics of white men. I had similar problems with Dunkirk. (However, it should be noted that Mendes does take time to at least cameo the contributions of non-white British soldiers) But this is very clearly a passion project and one where Mendes is cashing in a lot of favors to make the movie he wants to make. And it’s time to stop for one moment and think about exactly what kind of film comes out of that process and why, and how that compares to the barriers faced by some of 2019’s other top films and filmmakers. And is there a reason why Sam Mendes might get a Best Director nomination but Lulu Wang won’t? Which, again, isn’t a reason why Mendes shouldn’t be nominated. But maybe Todd Phillips shouldn’t?

All of that is to say that you should most certainly see 1917 and revel in its technical prowess, but also interrogate it a little. If not one of 2019’s absolutely best films, it’s one of its most technically audacious and certainly deserving of the awards hype it’s getting. My personal recommendations would be to not only watch this but then also delve back into Deakins’ back catalog, from his work with the Coen Brothers to Dennis Villanueve, to understand how much visual sauce he’s able to bring to most films.

4.25 out of 5 stars