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Review: The Flash #768

The Flash #768

The Flash kicks off its Infinite Frontier run with Wally West taking center stage. It also stumbles right out of the block with a forgettable issue that feels like a filler arc. The Flash #768 has Wally West making the decision that he wants to hang up his suit to spend more time with his newly reunited family. And, to do that, he feels like he needs the Speed Force taken from him.

Writer Jeremy Adams delivers a story that’s just ok. There’s nothing bad about the comic but it also doesn’t deliver anything that really stands out. It takes what should be some solid concepts and distracts things with a time travel sci-fi comedy. While Wally and Barry race so Barry can suck the Speed Force from Wally, the Speed Force acts up. Wally is sent to the past for unknown reasons that are teased as the issue progresses. There’s a lighthearted take to it all and some comedic moments. But, the issue’s strength is the exploration of how Barry and Wally have approached their roles. That is far too short.

But, this is jus the opening chapter in this arc and it all might come together. Beyond Barry and Wally’s different approach to life there’s an interesting exploration of Barry and Wally’s attachment to the Speed Force. Barry has a better understanding but Wally has a greater attachment to it. Again, there’s potential.

The art races around with Brandon Peterson, Marco Santucci, and David Lafuente mixing things up as the story hops around time. Mike Atiyeh, Arif Prianto, and Luis Guerrero handle the colors. Steve Wands provides the lettering. The art is good but it lacks a certain sense of motion that has been a highlight of the art of the series for some time. While Wally and Barry race, there’s a lack of flow that makes the art feel more like a snapshot in time as opposed to enhancing the movement of the characters.

There’s some small details to enjoy in The Flash #768. A scene of Wally and Barry and Iris walking down the street has some great comments from those watching. There’s also a lighthearted and “fun” tone about the comic as well. It’s a throwback in some ways. Overall though, this is a starting arc that doesn’t excite enough to have readers coming back for more.

Story: Jeremy Adams Art: Brandon Peterson, Marco Santucci, David Lafuente
Color: Mike Atiyeh, Arif Prianto, Luis Guerrero Letterer: Steve Wands
Story: 6.0 Art: 7.0 Overall: 6.0 Recommendation: Pass

DC Comics provided Graphic Policy with a FREE copy for review


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