TV Review: Batwoman S1E2 The Rabbit Hole

Batwoman

In the second episode of Batwoman, Jacob Kane and the Crows up the stakes; Kate continues to look to Bruce Wayne’s legacy for guidance as Luke Fox inadvertently gets pulled into Batwoman’s vigilante heroics; Sophie and Kate are forced to team up.

The second episode of Batwoman is interesting if not a bit dragged out. Much like the first episode, there’s something morose about the tone of the second. It’s slow and somewhat predictable but builds on aspects of the debut and improves in many ways.

While still serious, Ruby Rose is a bit more entertaining in her acting. Things aren’t quite as flat and there’s some subtle things she does in her delivery and movements that’s intriguing. Nicole Kang as Mary Hamilton, Kate’s stepsister, has a bigger role. Her character is playing an interesting aspect in the series as an exploration of the definition of family. Camrus Johnson as Luke Fox gets some acknowledgment as far as his family as well. Though it’s not dived into too much, it’s a nice touch. It plays into larger themes of the show and especially Kate’s relationship with her own father played by Dougray Scott. Rachel Skarsten‘s Alice is still the standout. The “reveal” that she’s Kate’s sister comes a bit too soon in the show and doesn’t deliver the emotional punch it should. The show does leave enough out there to create doubt of her identity.

Still, the show creates an interesting dynamic with Kate struggling with what to do with a villain who might her sister. That gets more complicated with the fact their father is also in pursuit and in denial that it’s his daughter.

Meagan Tandy‘s Sophie Moore is still the most interesting thing of the show though frustrating at the same time. Kate’s past relationship with her is present and the fact Sophie is now married to a man becomes more intriguing. The show acknowledging the bisexuality exists is nice, or there could be deeper denial at play as well with Kate being an out and confident gay woman and Sophie is still struggling. That’s the frustrating part but also potential further down the road in the show. But, as a whole, it’s nice to see the complicated reality of sexuality in real life.

There’s much improved in the second episode of Batwoman though some of the aspects such as Alice and Batwoman’s interaction is a bit predictable and frustrating. The show has touches of greatness and other moments not so much. Much like the debut, there’s potential there and it’s a show that has at least found a voice of its own, both for good and bad.

Overall Rating: 7.0